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URSAE MAJORIS 
Bridgewater State Co (lege Yearbook 
is pieased and proud 
to dedicate 
The 1990 SESQUICENTENNIAL 

YEARBOOK 
to 

Dn Jordan D* Fiore 

Ciass of 1940 
A teacher > historian, and schoiar) 
for fifty years he worked tirelessly 
to personify the mission and ideals 

°f 

Bridgewater State College. 





tfm> in TLcvtew 



iAvideniitt 



Page 142 



Page 162 



Page 200 



A symbol of education and 
learning which reads, "The 
Teacher's Doctrine, Sanctified 
By Truth, Shall Spread," was 
erected on the campus in 1967. 





his 150th Anniversary issue would 
Hot be complete without a brief 
fxtw of the schools exciting and his- 
past To cover each individual year 
fill a book in itself. The editors 
ogizefor any years or events the reader 
% should have been included but were 
"he current editors would also like to 
the many editors, living and dead, of 
hoks past, as it was their yearbooks 
gWjfi which we searched for our insight 
'the colorful history of our school 

in the sun on the front steps 
these columns, 
these steps, 
ove passed all those stem people, im- 
'>ably purposeful, 

are now in the world teaching chil- 



wuT come a time when I, too, 
sive in cap and gown, shall go down 
e stairs, 

turning to look back. 

now ? — 



iNow I drowse in tne sun watching people 
through half -open lids, 
STne wind hot on my cheeks, 
hornet buzzing me to sleep 

Tfiis poem anonymously written in the 
fate 1800s stiff holds some truth, even 
today. Many students Ceave Bridgewater 
State College and enter into "the world 
teaching children." Bridgewater still sends 
an impressive graduating class out into the 
world every year, and you will stiff un- 
doubtedly find students basking in the sun 
on a warm spring day. 





JJridgewater State College began as Bridge- 
water Normal School in 1840. It was a 
new and controversial idea that teaching, 
"....(ike law and medicine, was a profession 
and required some degree of preparation and 
professional training...." Witft the help of a 
few abdicated men (ex-President John Quincy 
Adams, Horace Mann, and Senator Daniel 
Webster among them) funds were raised, a 
public hearing was held, and on September 
9th, 1840, Mr. Nicholas Tillinghast, a native 
of Taunton, was named principal by Horace 
Mann, Twenty-eight students (seven men and 
twenty-one women) were also admitted on 
that very same day. 

The first two decades proved to be tur- 
bulent for the new school, but under strong 
leadership, the Normal School emerged and "a 
definite professional standard was, for the 
first time in American teacher education, set 
up." Once through this "experimental stage," 
the Normal School was accepted generally as 
an important part of American education. 

Succeeding Mr. TiSdnghast in 1853 was 
Marshall Conant, also from the Bridgewater 
area. Serving as principal until 1860, Mr. 
Conant was instrumental in creating positive 
changes at the school. Out of his term grad- 
uated many leaders in education, as well as 
ministers, physicians, and lawyers. 




KI55INC B 





eading tfie school from 1860 to 1933 
were, first, Albert G. Boy den and then 
his son, Arthur C. Boyden, Under their lead- 
ership, the school experienced remarkable 
growth. The original building was expanded 
and then replaced, and new dormitories were 
built New courses were added to the cur- 
riculum, and the school attracted men and 
women from aft over the world who left 
Bridgewater to "carry the school! s principles 
to distant lands." 

Arthur Clarke Boyden succeeded his father 
in 1906 as principal of the school for the next 
twenty-five years. In 1932, he became the 
first president of Bridgewater State Teachers 
College when the school received that des- 
ignation. With this change of leadership came 
the opening of the twentieth century. 

Bridgewater State College was still at this 
time called Bridgewater Normal ScfiooC Tfie 
strive for success was present then as it is 
today, as well as the closeness gained with the 
faculty as this passage from the 1900 year- 
book suggests: 

as the new century opens before us a 
fresh field of opportunities, let us enter it with 
the wisdom and worth of our principals' and 
teachers' precepts firmly in mind, realizing 
more and more as time passes, how much we 
owe to their kind guidance and the examples 
they set before us " 



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^ Ithough academics were primary, athletics 
were an integral part of the college ex- 
perience. Athletics at Bridge.wa.ter included 
football, baseball, basketball (women only), 
and tennis and have grown to include the vast 
array of athletics offered today. In 1900 the 
school yell was: 

BSN BSN Raft! Kohl 
BSN BSN Rah! Kohl 
Hoorah Roorah 

Normal Normal Rah Rah Rah 



That same year graduation was held on 
June 26, where 125 people graduated, all 
"....eager and anxious concerning the 
future. . 

The first decade of the new century saw 
stability, order, rules, and regimes. Then in 
the year 1911, construction of Woodward 
Hall began. Named in honor of Eliza Bond 
Woodward, a graduate of Bridgewater State 
Normal School and a member of the faculty 
from 1857 to 1887, it was built to ac- 
commodate the increasing student enrollment 
due to the growing popularity of the school It 
is today the college's oldest formitory. It 
contained rooms for 85 students, offices, re- 
ception rooms, and "all the modern con- 
veniences.'' 



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1912; the student body took over the 
production of the yearbook. Money to fi- 
nance the project was raised through. play 
performances and candy sates. Course of- 
ferings were expanded that year. For the first 
time Spanish was offered instead of Latin. 
American Literature was added as weft as a 
greenhouse and related courses. 

The. 1912 yearbook included an essay 
written by William D. Jackson, a member of 
the j acuity. Fifty years had passed and mem- 
ories of the Civd War stiff lingered. Bridge- 
water and surrounding towns were not (eft 
untouched by the. bloody war: 

Memories of the Civil War 

"I was in the cemetery (Lakeville); there 
was a great company there who met for the 
funeral of a soldier. I know now that the time 
was during the week following the fall of 
Richmond and preceding the death of Lincoln. 

A part of the war was also in our backyard 
at Lake Assawompsett in Lakeville. Here 
recruits were drilled and organized. There 
were long rows of white tents, lines of blue 
uniformed, drilling soldiers, and the exquisite 
odor of baked beans." 





n 1919; similar to today, students were 
required to pass a physical examination in 
the gym. Although today the. physical ex- 
amination is required as a part of a modem 
coupe's health services program, in 1919 the 
physical exam was necessary because students 
had to attend mandatory gym class (in what is 
now the Art Building) which certainly would 
not go over well today. 

This was also only a year after World War 
I ended. Lasting effects of the war still were 
present This can be seen in the everyday 
language used by the students, for example: 
Commander-in-Chief: The Principal 
Approacfutuj Foes: E^ams 
The Mess Hall: Normal Dining Hall 
Mo6uuation: Chapel 
Ammunition: Chalk and Erasers 
Headquarters: Dean's Office 
No-Man's Land: Woodward at Night 
A Scene of Battle: Basketball Games 

Students of this year realized "... a teach- 
er's work ties not only in s flowing the child 
that two phis three equals five, but also 
inculcating in him the principles of honor, 
truth, and loyalty which will, we hope, last all 
his life." In writing that, they very well could 
have been referring to Miss S. Elizabeth Pope. 
In 1920, Miss Pope joined the faculty at 
Bridgewater Normal School as the dean of 
students. She left such an impression on the 
school with her true dedication, that they 
honored her by naming a women's residence 
hall after her. 




26 




he. coming of spring was celebrated at 
' Bridgewater Normal with the Ivy March. 
Members of the junior class, green oak boughs 
in hand, formed dries on either side of the 
walk that (ead to the school They had boughs 
raised high symbolizing the living strength of 
the school A bugle was sounded calling to life 
the members of the graduating classes as they 
marched on to the campus in a double line. 
This double line changed into a single file 
illustrating the manner in which the indi- 
viduals life becomes of more importance; for 
the greater problems of life art solved by the 
individual alone, with the assistance of only a 
"Divine Aid." The graduates, ivy garlands in 
hand, encircled the Campus Pond. They then 
planted the ivy as a symbol of love and 
affection for their Alma Mater. 

In 1924. tragedy hit the school in the form 
of a fire. The years following the disaster 
were a period of adjustment, unity, and 
heightened school spirit. Consumed in the fire 
were the Normal School, old Tiflingftast Hall, 
and the Cottage. A stone across from the 
current Art Building marks the spot where the 
Normal School once stood. 





MM 




(asses were cancelled for three weeks and 

remarkably, when dosses resumed, only 
one class had to be omitted. Here is where the 
school pulled together. Some classes were held 
in the basement of Woodward Had where 
heat, light, and ventilation left a lot to be 
desired. It was affectionately caCCecf 
"basement college." 

Throughout this period school spirit re- 
mained high and students managed to keep up 
with their studies. In some rooms, three 
classes had to be combined. There were even 
instances, when in the absence of an in- 
structor, classes still carried on. 

As part of the rebuilding of the College, 
Boyden Hall was constructed in 1926. 
Named in honor of Albert Gardner Boyden 
and Arthur Clarke Boyden, a plaque inside the 
front door reads, "They gave their hearts, 
their minds and their fives to tfiis scftooC" 
Tfiis building still stands today and serves as 
the main administration budding. 

1927 saw tiie beginning of the Campus 
Comment, the school newspaper. Its aim was 
to provide the school with a paper describing 
the activities of the school, an outlet for 
creative literature, and to secure a further spirit 
of unity among the students and faculty. 




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31 




1 



J^pporendy not affected by the Great De- 
pression in any significant way, Bridge- 
water State. Normal School carried on through- 
out the 30s with stability and tittle change. 
The president at this time was Zenos E. 
Scott Students were involved in numerous 
clubs and organizations. Examples of these 
are as follows: garden club, hobby club, li- 
brary club, glee club, and many others. One of 
the more popular clubs was the topics of the 
day club. As the name suggests, they dis- 
cussed and addressed current issues and were 
essentially an organization of "ists;" pac- 
ifists, socialists, anarchists, economists, and 
sociologists to name a few. Some of the main 
issues of the day were, of course, the growing 
totalitarian governments in Europe and Asia, 
as well as less worldly issues like swinging 
and how to peel the "big apple" . 

Another large and popular organization 
was the Girl Scouts of America. In the words 
of one scout/ ^..Scouting combines practical 
training with adventure, work with fun, and 
weaves into every endeavor high ideals and 
aspirations." Some of the Scouts' activities 
included camping, working witR the brownie 
pack, philanthropy, and leadership training to 
aid in starting ana' planning "troops of our 
own." 





32 



r p he late 1930s and early 1940s at Bridge- 
water State, Teachers College were fairly 
busy and fun-fitted. The unstable, conditions 
around the globe seemed distant and remote. 
These were times of dances and sipping cokes 
at the local drugstore. Students had the usual 
concerns about classes and exams and they 
celebrated the unprecedented third victory of 
Roosevek in office. 

At the turn of the new decade, Europe 
exploded into war. The following passage, 
taken from the 1942 yearbook, gives an 
account of the war as seen through a student! s 
eyes: 

"War had finally come to Europe, and one 
bright May morning we awoke to find our 
nice little world shattered. As we listened to 
the news bulletins on the radio in horrified 
silence, we learned that Holland was invaded 
and the battle of France had finally begun. 
And our Sophomore year ended with the roar 
of the cannons and the sharp crackle of guns 
across the ocean, which, was gradually be- 
coming narrower." 

Concern and fear fell over the campus but 
life continued as usuai This continued until 
1941, when the United States "officially" 
entered the war. Some students lost friends or 
family to the war and others supported the 
war in many ways. "The shadow of war was 
tokening, and in April it stretched out a cold 
hand to dutch the popular leader of our class, 
Dick Dorey. By June we had almost ceased to 
be a co-ed college in anything but name." 



i 





~ tudents bought war stamps instead of can- 
dy and were told that not only would it 
help the war cause but it would ". . . keep 
your weight down." Marats Gras, hosted by 
the Trench Club, took place as usual, but due 
to the scarcity of men no king was crowned. 

In 1945 the war finally ended and the 
Class of '45 dedicated its yearbook, "to the 
men and women of '45 who are fighting for 
victory. To them . . . wherever they may be, 
we dedicate this book." 

In 1948, the concept of "freshman ini- 
tiation" began at the college. Part of the 
"initiation'' process required freshmen to 
wear their clothes inside out, weed the tennis 
courts, and scrub the steps of the admin- 
istration building. 

1951 saw the death of Dr. John] Kelly, 
president of the college from 1937-1951. In 
1956; the new gymnasium was dedicated to 
Dr. Kelly. In 1952, Dr. Clement C. Maxwell 
became the seventh head of the college. 

At the end of the decade, beginning in 
1959, the test results of the College Entrance 
Examination Boanf were, along with the stu- 
dents' high school records and references, the 
only criteria for admission. Bridgewater State 
Teachers College became State College at 
Bridgewater in 1960. In 1958, the Boyden 
Gymnasium became a library and was named 
in honor of President Maxwell 




36 




fjplie 1960s were a period of extensive. 

growth. Pope Haft, a new women's dor- 
mitory, opened in 1960. It was named in 
honor of Miss Etizabeth Pope, dean of women 
from 1919 to 1955. Scott Haft buik in 
1961; was tfie first all-male dormitory ever 
buiil at Bridgewater. It was named in honor of 
Dr. Zenos Scott, fifth president of the. cottege. 
In 1964 was tfie opening of the science 
budding, named in honor of Marshaft Conant, 
distinguished scientist wfto served as the 
second principal of the school In 1967, on 
Great Hu% two new residences were buik to 
house 600 students — 300 men and 300 
women. They were named in honor of Dr. 
Eden Shea, dean of women from 1955 to 
1375, and George M. Durgin, a veteran math 
teacher at the scftooC 

Tfie 1970s were exciting at Bridgewater 
State College. The years were a time of 
wonder; wonder of what (if e was ready about 
and what the future held As James Scroggs 
said, "Questions, questions, always flooding 
in on me. But I wouldn't have it any other 
way. What a bore hfe would be if no ques- 
tions occurred or if no problems presented 
themselves. That wouldn't even be living." 
(1971) 





38 



ridgewater had many guest visitors in the 
70s, from politicians to rock stars to 
sports figures. In 1971, Ted Kennedy spoke, 
to the student body. In 1972, Livingston 
Toy Cor had a concert and Amie Ginsburg 
"D.J.'d' at a dance. Other sports figures to 
visit were Bob Montgomery of the Red Sox 
and Terry O'ReiSLy of the Bruins. Rounding 
out the bi£L of musical performers in the 70s 
were Ike and Tina Turner and the Beach 
Boys, cdl performing before packed crowds at 
the coUege. And let's not Jorget Commander 
Cody and his Lost Piconet Airmen fiostiruj 
the 197 5 spring concert. 




fte 1980s opened with a disco on wheels 
(rotter skates) in the commuter cafe. Some 
of the popular songs of the early 80s were 
"Centerfold' by J. Geils Band, "Bom to 
Run" by Springsteen, "Superfreak" by Kid 
James, "Whip It" by Devo, "PhysicaC' by 
Olivia Newton John, and many others. 

1981 saw the release of the American 
fiostages from Iran after 444 days in cap- 
tivity. Also, Gloria Steinem appeared at 
Bridgewater discussing women's roles in so- 
ciety. 

In 1984, Cab Calloway appeared at 
Bridgewater with the Count Basie Orcfiestra. 
1984 was also a big year for the Women's 
Basketball Team. It was ranked fourth in the 
nation, with a record of 2Z-5. Athletics 
seemed to be the theme of this year. The 
United States hosted the Summer Olympic 
Games in Los Angeles. This was also the 
year that Boston's Doug FCutie won the 
Heisman Trophy. 

The band Face to lace performed at Bridge- 
water in 1985. The song "Wt are the 
World" hit the air waves as performers from 
the U.S. showed their support for the famine 
in Africa, 

And who can forget the heart rendering 
loss the Red Sox suffered in the 1986 World 
Series? Hopes were high as the series was 
tied, but hope was dashed when the New 
York Mets won the series, 8 to 5, in the 
seventh game. 




P> 



42 




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he end of the 1980s was marked with 
good relations between the U.S. and the 
Soviet Union. This can be seen in the 1987 
summit on arms control in Reykjavik, Iceland 
between Reagan and Gorbachev. These re- 
lations have also continued into the 90s with 
President Bush. 

The 1980s were ravaged with scandal, 
from Jim and Tammy Baker to Oliver North. 
Bridgewater, too, felt the anger and betrayal 
of scandal President Gerard Indelicato was 
forced to resign due to federal allegations, 
accusing him of using forged state, contracts 
for personal gain. Later he was convicted and 
served time. 

In the 80s we said goodbye to many 
popular sitcoms. For example, "M.A.S.H.," 
"Barney MiOer," "All in the Family," 
"Happy Days," and "Laveme and Shirley" 
all ended lengthy stays atop the primetime 
(adder. Fortunately, these were replaced with 
equally successful and entertaining shows; 
"AC//' "The Cosby Show," "Designing 
Women," and the "Golden Girls" were but a 
few. 

Mini series were popular at tftis time. 
Hollywood' gave us "Shogun," "Winds of 
War," and "NortnandSoutn." Tfxey kept us 
riveted to our seats for many nights. 





oing into the 1990s, students across the 
state face an uncertain future. The state is 
in a fiscal crisis and the colieges and students 
are struggling to absorb drastic cuts in budget 
and hikes in tuition. Yet these factors witf not 
dampen the school spirit, but strengthen it, as 
the past 150 years have s flown. 





47 



The parking lot of 1967 may 
have been small, unpaved, and 
muddy, however, it was still a 
popular place between classes 
to talk with other commuter 
friends. 









J 150 



A New Progra 



Social Orientation to BSC 



The Freshman Experience 
was a great success this year as 
the incoming freshmen got a 
chance to settle-in a few days 
prior to the beginning of school. 
Although most important to its 
great success is the opportunity 
for the freshmen to become fa- 
miliar with the campus, equally 
important is the opportunity for 
them to become familiar with 
other students. 

The program began two days 



before school started with the res- 
ident freshmen moving into the res- 
idence halls and being a part of 
several events later in the day. The 
big kick-off started in the gym 
where all the students gathered for 
their first taste of college life. 

All in all, the day was a great bag 
of fun where new students could 
come together and feel welcomed 
and a part of the college commu- 
nity. 





52 




54 



An Inauguration of 
Tenth President 



Dr. Adrian Tinsley was inaugu- 
rated as the tenth president of 
Bridgewater State College at 2:30 
p.m. in the Campus Center Au- 
ditorium on October 28, 1989. Dr. 
Tinsley is the tenth person, and first 
woman, to take the oath of office in 
the 150 year history of the College, 
and her inauguration was the be- 
ginning of the celebration of the 
College's 150th Anniversary. 

Dr. Tinsley's inauguration was 
filled with activity as special lec- 
tures were given, a President's Din- 
ner was served in the commuter 



cafe, and the Paul Winter Consort 
performed in her honor. 

The procession of faculty also 
included special delegates sent 
from other colleges and universities 
across the nation. Overall, the cer- 
emony was highlighted by Dr. Tin- 
sley's speech to fight for education. 
Another highlight occured when 
Chancellor Jenifer held President 
Tinsley's hand high in the air and 
proclaimed that there is no other 
person more capable than she to 
lead the College. 





56 




57 




59 




61 



Rallying for 
Education 



The forecast was for light rain, 
but that did nothing to dampen the 
spirits of the students from Bridge- 
water, about 900 or so, who would 
join up with 14,000 others from all 
around the Commonwealth to show 
the state legislature that they cared 
about education. 

All of the state colleges were 
present at the protest, which was 
held to call attention to the plight of 
the state higher education system. 
After cutbacks at each of the 
schools, the protest was organized; 
students would march on Beacon 
Hill and then meet with their rep- 
resentatives to discuss what was 



being done about the state's fiscal 
crisis. 

The protest did have some pos- 
itive points. Boston Mayor Ray- 
mond Flynn came out in support of 
the students. Chairman of the 
Board of Regents of Higher Ed- 
ucation Paul Tsongas spoke before 
students and the media, urging leg- 
islators to keep the budgets of state 
colleges and universities intact. 

The state financial woes contin- 
ued. But for one moment in time, 
all students within Massachusetts 
stood united and made the legis- 
lature wake up to the concerns 
around them. 





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66 




Homecoming 



Bridgewater's traditional bonfire 
was held near the new tennis courts 
to kick off a packed-full-of-fun 
weekend of events. The bonfire, 
held by the brothers of Sigma Chi, 
lit the sky as spirits soared while 
the fire blazed on. 

The highlight of Homecoming 
was the football game where our 
own Bridgewater Bears faced 
Westfield State College. Our Bears 
stomped on Westfield to win 27-7, 
despite the cold wind and severe 



mud problem. This Homecoming 
victory brought the Bears' record 
to 7 wins, losses. 

The Homecoming Parade was a 
barrel of fun and surprises as clubs 
and greeks ran about frantically to 
build their floats before the 12:00 
start. The theme for the parade 
was "As Time Goes By," symbol- 
izing the 150th celebration that the 
College was preparing for that se- 
mester. 




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70 




73 




75 




76 



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7? 




79 



Winter Graduation 



Winter Graduation was filled 
with grandeur as the graduates 
walked down the hallway to file into 
the auditorium. The faculty dressed 
in their prestigious gowns and 
hoods, the honored delegates in 
their high degrees, and guests of 
the graduates all looked upward to 
witness the day when all that hard 



labor and work paid off. 

Several of the women carried 
roses as a gift from loved ones near 
by. Many of the gentlemen boasted 
of their excitement to leave and 
face new challenges. But all were 
filled with peace as they had finally 
finished that long race of education 
which began so long ago. 





80 





84 



i 



Beach Party 



Where in the world would you 
find a live band, beach volleyball, 
ice cream, dancing, multi-colored 
jams and Hawaiian shirts, and lots 
of people having the time of their 
lives? The Program Commitee's an- 
nual Beach Party, that's where! 

The Party was packed with 



surf'n dudes and hot beach babes 
dancing to the smooth cool tunes of 
the rock 'n roll band which played 
all the tunes you could think of 
from A-Z. 

Who would have thought a 
Beach Party in the cold month of 
March would be such a hot event? 







m 

x. 1 




J 






86 




88 





89 



Alvin Ailey 



Among the many delights of the 
Fine Art Series held at Bridgewater 
was an enthusiastic dance perfor- 
mance by the Alvin Ailey Reper- 
tory Ensemble. 

Since its inception, the company 



has won critical acclaim for its 
cross-country tours, for its perfor- 
mances in prestigious dance series, 
and residencies at major colleges 
and universities. The company also 
makes frequent visits to public 



schools in New York and New Jer- 
sey. 

In recognition of its public per- 
formances and community out- 
reach programs, the Alvin Ailey 
Repertory Ensemble has received 



numerous honors, awards and' 
proclamations from around the: 
country. 




Club Soda 




92 




93 



Mandela Rally 



When news had reached the stu- 
dents in Bridgewater of the release 
of Mandela, plans for celebration 
where put into effect. The Amnesty 
International Club organized a cam- 
pus rally in honor and celebration 
of the release of South African 
leader Nelson Mandela. 

Many students and faculty 
turned out to march to the steps of 



Boyden Hall holding signs asking 
for freedom and the end of 
prejudice. The rally continued on 
as a candle march was held that 
evening to further celebrate the oc- 
casion. 

Though the fight still goes on for 
the oppressed in many foreign 
lands, one day the world will be 
united as one. 





94 



La Boheme staged at 
Bridgewater 



BRIDGEWATER- Puccini's "La 
Boheme," with its compassionate 
portrayal of Bohemian life in Paris 
in the 1890s, received a dramatic 
and sensitive staging by the New 
York City Opera National Compa- 
ny at Bridgewater State College. 

Appearing in the college's Fine 
Art Series, the company provided a 
capacity audience with a perfor- 
mance steeped in superb singing, 
acting, and scenery that would 
make any theatrical group envious. 



The opera has an interesting his- 
tory in that it was based on a novel 
written by Henry Murger and led to 
a lifetime of ill feeling between Puc- 
cini and Ruggiero Leoncavallo, the 
composer of "Pagliacci." 

Directed with precision by 
Patrick Bakman, with English 
supertitles by Sonya Friedman, the 
production was extremely well 
paced and gripped the audience 
throughout. 



96 





97 



International Night 



The annual International Night 
was held in the Campus Center 
Ballroom where fine and exotic 
foods from all around the world 
were served and experienced. 
Also, entertainment was provided 
to educate Bridgewater on the 
many different aspects of food, 
styles, appearances, and life in 



general. 

Though each food might not suit 
each individual, the entertainment 
was filled with excitement. From 
the demonstrations of self-defense 
and the breath-taking dancers of 
Holland and Cameron to the mod- 
ern band from Fall River, all 
sparked with fun and excitement. 




It's The Road Race 




On Friday, October 20th, the campus streets were filled with 

BAIRS Club held the 2.7 mile an- spectators yelling and screaming 

nual road race. Over forty runners words of encouragement to friends 

participated in the race which in the race. 

marked the first event to kick off Crossing the finish line first were 

Homecoming Weekend. in category number one (men's 23 

Starting at Boyden Hall, the run- and over) Greg Smith 13.43, two 

ners ran down past Scott Hall to (men's 23 and under) Adam Pearl 

cut across a side street back to the 13.35, three (women's 23 and 

Catholic Center toward Pope Hall over) Janet Walker 19.05, four ( 

and onward to the Hill and back to women's 23 and under) Julie 

Boyden again for the finish. The Gilmett 16.06. 




Del Fuego s Rock On 



Homecoming started off with a some students. 



bang Thursday, October 19th, with 
the Del Fuegos rocking the Campus 
Center Auditorium in full charge. 
Besides playing to the enthusiastic 
crowd, they added to their perfor- 
mance by using special effects on 
stage. 

The Del Fuegos' energetic band 
led the crowd bouncing about 
throughout the night. The highlight 
of the concert was when lead singer 
Dan Zandes leaped off the stage 
into the audience to dance with 



The band's acoustics were great. 
The guitars and drums were so loud 
and distinct, that the voices of the 
crowd were unheard. The band 
played a variety of songs from its 
album. 

The performance ended with 
"Don't Run Wild." The crowd was 
begging the band to stay. As the 
Del Fuegos left the stage they 
promised that they would come 
again and rock us one more time. 




102 




Dave Binder 



The smooth rocking songs of 
James Taylor were captured as 
Dave Binder sang "Fire and Rain" 
and "James Steamroller." Dave 
Binder, though a man of enormous 
talent to be able to sound just like 
James Taylor, spoke as well on 
James Taylor's life story and the 
message behind each of his songs 
which were his final claim to fame. 

The shocking "Mexico" song 
was an eye-opener to all. However, 



his performance was so incredible 
that one visit wasn't enough for 
Bridgewater students. They begged 
for another show. This time it was 
the "1969" show and the era of 
free love, drugs, and rock and roll. 

Two shows were both packed 
and filled with fun. Whether it was 
the music of James Taylor or the 
music of the 1969 free love move- 
ment, Dave Binder will always be 
remembered. 





104 



Canadian Brass 



The Bridgewater State College 
Fine Art Series was initiated on 
Thursday, October 5th, with the 
performance of one of the world's 
greatest ensembles, The CANADI- 
AN BRASS. The concert was ded- 
icated to Dr. Tinsley, the first wom- 
an president of Bridgewater State 
College. 

Since their first appearance on 
the music scene, the Canadian 



Brass have revolutionized brass 
music and established the brass 
quintet as a vital force in the music 
world today. Over the years, these 
classically trained musicians 
Fredric Mills, Ronald Romm, David 
Ohanian, Eugene Watts, and 
Charles Daillenbach, have inaugu- 
rated a new "golden age" of brass 
music with their unique blend of 
virtuosity and entertainment. 




106 




Amnesty Concert 

Rocks 



The Amnesty International Club 
of Bridgewater State College was 
fortunate to get three bands to per- 
form a benefit concert for free, to 
raise support for the oppressed 
everywhere. Featured at the con- 
cert was the outrageous sound of 
the rock band "Back Stoke to 
Cuba." 

The night went on and on as the 
dance floor pounded with stomping 
feet. The music screamed onward 
as the sweat poured down the face 
of the lead singer with the hot lights 
glaring on him. 






108 



Monster Dash 



The traditional Bridgewater 
Monster Dash was, as it always is, 
creatively filled with crazed people 
who know how to have the time of 
their lives. Pure excitement, laugh- 
ter, and a crazy sense of humor was 
present. 

Such outrageous outfits as Bat- 
man, Tweetie Bird, Sylvester the 
Cat, household mothers, prisoners, 
witches, and many more interesting 
characters were able to grace the 
day with their presence. Though all 
imaginations had gone wild, so did 
the day — wild with fun and a 
great success. 





110 



The RAT, 'Night Life 



The Rat, a place where the 
"mature" college student can go 
and unwind, order up a rootBEER, 
and eat some popcorn while watch- 
ing THE game on the big screen. It 
is a place for only the reserved. 
YEH right, if you believe that one, 
boy do I have another one for you. 



The Rat, the place where stu- 
dents can gather and DRINK, 
DRINK, DRINK!!! Yes the Rat: live 
bands, comedians, DJs, and live 
games on the tube. Sticks, pop- 
corn, chicken wings, fries, video 
games, music, friendship, and your 
very own pitcher. 




112 




114 




115 




SPRING BALL 



Once upon a time, in the, far far 
away (and of Mansfield, Bridge- 
water State held its traditional 
Spring Baft. There was magic, ro- 
mance., and electricity in the air as 
everyone filed into the had. 

Being the biggest social event 
of the year, the students had no 



problem with getting down on the 
dance floor, and partying the night 
away. 

lor everyone who attended this 
beautiful 1990 (( SpringbaH," it 
was truly a "fairy tale" which 
provided magical memories of a 
very special night in May. 




116 




119 




122 




125 



Radio Days in 
Theater 



The Ensemble Theater of Bridge- 
water State College put on several 
plays and musicals throughout the 
school's semesters, but it was their 
last performance that deserves spe- 
cial merit. 

The Alumni Association held a 
contest for written plays for the 
theater department to perform. 



The winner was a woman who 
wrote a play dealing with the radio 
days of broadcasting. 

The student actors brought her 
script to life, and excitement was 
everywhere. The play was indeed a 
great success and almost sold out 
both shows. 





126 




127 





Senior Week 



The last few weeks that a Senior 
has at Bridgewater are always 
memorable. For instance, the Sen- 
ior Dinner Dance is a time to say 
goodbye to all the friends you've 
made at school. But friends would 
stay with us no matter what. 

The Senior Night in the Rat is a 
blast where Seniors could have that 
one last blast of fun and excite- 
ment. They dance a little, drink a 
lot, eat some, and remember how 
they met their college friends and 
the good times of the college years. 

All in all, whether it is the Rat, 
Dinner Dance, or the Booze Cruise 
all are able to share their best time 
with each other and foresee a 
bright future ahead. 





130 




132 



Commencement 



The final walk was finally here. 
Graduation! The day was filled with 
blue skies and sunshine. The day 
was highlighted with parents crying 
at the sight of their son /daughter 
receiving that Bridgewater diplo- 



Commencement, as always, was 
also filled with signs and messages 
on caps to loved ones in the back- 
ground. Some were bold to say 



thanks for everything while other 
messages touched a different note 
with "I Need A Job" or "Party is 
Over." 

Whether the party really is or is 
not over remains to be seen. How- 
ever, Bridgewater will always mean 
a certain something special to each 
of us, even when we are far away 
or older than we were that day. 




;r : 5 

134 




135 n 



I 




H 

137 




138 







I: ■ 



5|. 

141 




1940 — World War II brought 
bags upon bags of mail, as seen 
by this woman, who holds in 
her arms several gas rationing 
cards. 



T 



4th of July Becomes Box Office Smash 




East Traveling West 



Voyager 2 Discovers Neptune Moon 



ft 



Lenin Statue Removed 





145 




"Chinese Students Challenge Communists" 



Pro-democracy demonstrations by stu- 
dents, which had started in April of 1989 
and had intensified during May, were halt- 
ed abruptly in early June when soldiers of 
the People's Liberation Army (PLA) took 
control of central Beijing by force. Thou- 
sands of unarmed students and civilians 
were killed, according to the many West- 
ern journalists present, although subse- 
quent Chinese accounts sought to deny 
this. The military crackdown provoked an 
outburst of anti-government protest in 
most cities and aroused immediate and 
widespread international condemnation. 
There were reports that a full-scale civil 
war was about to break out, with rival 
armies congregated around the capital 
city supposedly preparing for battle. 
However, within a week of the massacre, 
Deng Xiaoping, the country's leader, had 
praised the PLA action and denounced 
the student protests as a "counter- 
revolutionary rebellion;" mass arrests 
and executions followed. Toward the end 
of the month, the Communist Party, Zhao 
Ziyang, signalled the victory of conser- 
vative elements in the two-month power 
struggle which had been provoked by con- 
flicting responses to the student demon- 
strations. 

At 2:00 a.m. on June 3, approximately 
10,000 unarmed troops in civilian cloth- 



ing moved from their base on the outskirts 
of Beijing towards the city center and 
Tiananmen Square, which had been oc- 
cupied by student demonstrators since 
late April. Before reaching the square, 
the troops were halted by large crowds 
and by barricades constructed across the 
main streets leading to the city center. 
Another group of soldiers, many armed, 
were immobilized west of Tiananmen 
Square and some of their weapons were 
taken. During the early afternoon a mes- 
sage from the PLA headquarters in Beij- 
ing was broadcast over the city's radio 
station, warning that "completely illegal 
activities by a handful of people" had 
roused the Army "to great indignation." 
Soon afterwards, armed police advanced 
briefly from the compound which housed 
the offices and residences of the country's 
leading politicians in Tiananmen Square, 
and fired tear gas into a crowd of dem- 
onstrators before attacking them with 
truncheons and electric cattle prods. At 
the same time soldiers attacked demon- 
strators south of Tiananmen Square and 
columns of troops spilled out from the 
Great Hall of the People on the western 
side of Tiananmen Square, although the 
progress of the latter group was imme- 
diately blocked by dense crowds. At 
about 6:30 p.m. the PLA broadcast an- 



other announcement, warning the city's 
residents to remain in their homes. Two 
hours later, amid an atmosphere of rising 
tension fuelled by rumors of an impending 
military assault against the Tiananmen 
demonstrators, large crowds congregated 
at the western gateway to Central Beijing, 
where barricades were erected. Eventu- 
ally, just before midnight, troops from the 
27th Army in tanks and armored per- 
sonnel carriers shot their way through the 
barricades. 

On June 4, the 27th Army convoy 
moved in an easterly direction arriving at 
the last bridge in the west before the city 
center at 1:00 a.m., before confronting 
heavy resistance. At about 1:30 a.m. the 
PLA headquarters in Beijing broadcast an 
emergency notice claiming that a "grave 
counter-revolutionary riot" was under- 
way in the capital. Soon after this an- 
nouncement foot soldiers entered 
Tiananmen Square, firing on fleeing dem- 
onstrators. At the same time heavy ar- 
tillery fire was reported in areas off the 
Square, where large numbers of military 
and civilian vehicles had been set afire. 
The student protesters congregated in a 
small circle around the Monument for 
Revolutionary Martyrs. By 3:00 a.m., 
troops armed with automatic weapons 
had surrounded the students on four sides 



and proceeded to fire mercilessly on 
crowds both in and around the Square. 
Ambulances and tricycle carts conveyed 
the injured and the dead from the Square 
to the city's hospitals. At 4:00 a.m. the 
lights in Tiananmen were extinguished 
without warning and a large convoy of 
military vehicles moved in from the east 
and west, eventually to form two north- 
south lines across the Square. At about 
5:00 a.m. the remaining students in the 
Square voted to leave; they proceeded to 
the south and were allowed to pass out of 
Tiananmen Square before being shot at 
and crushed by tanks and personnel car- 
riers. By 7:30 a.m., convoys of soldiers 
were patrolling the city's main east-west 
route, firing at random. After a two-hour 
lull crowds began to build up again, but 
were quickly attacked by roving groups of 
soldiers who, according to Western media 
reports, had no reservations about shoot- I 
ing at unarmed, fleeing civilians in the I 
back. During the last morning, amid con- j 
tinuing firing and confusion, helicopters 
landed in Tiananmen Square to collect, 
and dispose of, the corpses of the dead. ; 



146 



"IRAN Loses its Spiritual Leader" 





Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, Iran's 
spiritual leader, died late on June 3, 
1989, at the age of 86 after suffering a 
heart attack. He had entered the hospital 
on May 23, suffering from intestinal can- 
cer, and surgery to halt internal bleeding 
was reported to have been performed 
successfully, but on the afternoon of June 
3rd it was announced on radio and tel- 
evision that "a difficulty had arisen" in 
the process of treatment. Khomeini's 
death was announced on Tehran radio 
early on June 4th by his son and personal 
secretary Ahmad Khomeini. 

Born Sayyed Ruhollah in 1902, 
Khomeini took his clerical name from his 
birthplace, the central Iranian village of 
Khomein. In the early 1920s, he went to 
the shrine city of Qom where he studied 
and taught in a seminary and by the early 
1930s, he was emerging as a leading 
scholar, attracting hundreds of young stu- 
dents to his lectures on ethics and the- 
ology. In 1944, he wrote his first overtly 
political book, but it was not until the 
death of the then Shia supreme religious 
leader in 1960, that Khomeini fully en- 
tered the political arena. 

During the early 1960s, Khomeini led 
traditional religious opposition to Shah 
Mohammed Reza Pahlavi's "White Rev- 
olution," which he denounced as part of a 
U.S. plot to enslave Iran. His arrest in 
Qom in June 1963 precipitated riots in 
Tehran and other cities in which at least 
100 people were killed, and the following 
year he was ordered into exile by the 
Shah's secret police. After a short time in 
Turkey he eventually settled in the Shia 
holy city of Najif in Iraq in October 1965. 
While in Najav, Khomeini maintained con- 
tact with merchants and clergymen in 
Iran, and during the early 1970s, he be- 
gan to develop his theory of Islamic gov- 
ernment. 

Widespread demonstrations against 
the Shah's rule and in support of 
Khomeini broke out in Iran in late 1977 
and early 1978. In October 1978, in the 
face of mounting unrest in Iran, Khomeini 
was expelled from Iraq and moved to 
Paris. While in France he came to be 
viewed as the main symbol of opposition 
to the Shah, his directives being conveyed 
to his followers through his chief aides and 
in the form of taped messages which were 
rapidly circulated throughout the coun- 
try's 80,000 mosques. Under mounting 
pressure, the Shah left Iran on what he 
officially described as a "vacation" in 
mid-January 1979. On February 1st 
Khomeini returned to Iran to a massive 
welcome from his supporters and 1 1 days 
later, after heavy street fighting in Te- 
hran, the last vestiges of the monarchy 
were overthrown and the "Islamic Rev- 
olution" assumed power. On April 1st, 
1979, Khomeini proclaimed the establish- 
ment of the Islamic Republic of Iran and in 
early December 1979, a new Constitution 
was approved overwhelmingly by refer- 
endum. Under the Constitution, Khomeini 
was formally named the Islamic Repub 
lie's spiritual leader for the rest of his 
natural life. 



147 



Nelson Mandela walked free 
from the Victor Verster Prison in 
the early afternoon of February 11, 
1990. The date of his release had 
only been announced by South Af- 
rican President F. W. de Klerk at a 
news conference on February 10. 

Speculation that Mandela's re- 
lease was imminent had heightened 
in preceding weeks. As the world's 
most famous political prisoner, his 
emergence at the age of 71, after 
27 years in prison, was a moment 
of jubilation for black South Afri- 
cans, who poured into the streets 
for prolonged celebration once 
news of his release was confirmed. 
Similar reactions were reported 
throughout Africa, where Mandela 
was already seen as a people's 
hero at the time of his imprison- 
ment in 1962. The moment of his 
release, and his subsequent state- 
ments were observed with intense 
interest inside South Africa and 
throughout the world. 

De Klerk's action in freeing 
Mandela at this time after years of 
international pressure for his re- 
lease was seen as an acknowledge- 
ment of the urgent need for the 
government to open negotiations 
with legitimate black leaders, in re- 
sponse to the ANC's Harare Dec- 
laration of August 1989 when it set 
out its own proposals for political 
change in South Africa. 

Accompanied by his wife Winnie, 
Nelson Mandela was driven from 
the prison to Cape Town along a 
route lined by thousands of sup- 
porters. On the steps of the City 
Hall he spoke to a crowd of 50,000 
who had waited for hours for his 
appearance. 

His first words were a salute to 
the people of South Africa, to 
whom he declared: "I stand here 
before you not as a prophet but as 
a humble servant of you, the peo- 
ple. Your tireless and heroic sac- 
rifices have made it possible for me 
to be here today — I, therefore, 
place the remaining years of my life 
in your hands." He expressed grat- 
itude to "the millions of my com- 
patriots and those in every corner 
of the globe who have campaigned 
tirelessly for my release." 



148 




Earthquake Strikes San Francisco" 



CALIFORNIA EARTH- 
QUAKE 

A fifteen second earth- 
quake, measuring 6.9 on the 
Richter Scale, inflicted exten- 
sive damage in the San Fran- 
cisco Bay area on October 17, 
1989. Initial estimates of a 
death toll in excess of 250 
were later revised to fewer 
than 100. The uncertainty 
arose from the fact that most 
of the dead were crushed with- 
in their cars when an elevated 
section of the Interstate 880 



highway in the Oakland area 
collapsed onto its lower tier 
during the evening rush hour. 

The epicenter of the quake 
was in a relatively unpopulat- 
ed area some 10 miles north 
of the coastal town of Santa 
Cruz. The most extensive 
damage within San Francisco 
occurred in the Marina District 
where many of the buildings 
were over 50 years old. The 
area was also devastated by 
fires caused by fractured gas 
pipes. Elsewhere in the city - 



with the exceptions of the I- 
880 collapse, damage was less 
severe, in part because of 
strict building regulations but 
also because most of the city, 
other than the bay area, was 
built on rock rather than mud. 
These differences ensured 
that the consequences of the 
quake were considerably less 
serious than they could have 
been. Although the disaster 
was the second worst earth- 
quake suffered by the U.S., 
many geologists considered 



that it did not constitute the se- 
vere earthquake which had been 
widely predicted. 

Congress passed legislation on 
October 25 which added $2.85 
billion to the federal disaster re- 
lief funds, and which relaxed re- 
strictions on how the money 
could be used. The bill, which 
was signed by President Bush on 
October 26, was also designed to 
extend to those areas of the 
country which had been dam- 
aged by Hurricane Hugo. 



149 



"The Iron Curtain Crumbles" 



FALL OF BERLIN WALL 

Soon after the fall of Erich 
Honecker as leader of East Ger- 
many, the Central Committee of 
the East German Communist Party 
announced the news that all border 
crossings to the Federal Republic of 
Germany and West Berlin could be 
used and were now open. Until new 
travel legislation could be enacted, 



those applying to make private 
journeys abroad could apply with- 
out meeting the previous condi- 
tions, and permission would be giv- 
en promptly. 

As East Germans absorbed and 
began to take advantage of the de- 
cision, the flow of visitors westward 
became a flood until on November 
10, 1989, when citizens were al- 



lowed for a while to cross the bor- 
der without having their documents 
stamped. Many new border cross- 
ings were opened, especially in Ber- 
lin. By November 23, over 
11,000,000 visas had reportedly 
been issued. 

Chancellor Helmut Kohl of West 
Germany, who had flown to War- 
saw, interrupted his visit to return 



to Bonn where he called an emer- 
gency cabinet meeting. Speaking 
on November 10, in front of Westj 
Berlin's Schoneberg city hall, Kohli 
described the day as "an historic! 
day for Berlin and for Germany"', 
and called for a direct meeting with 
Egon Krenz, the caretaker prime' 
minister of East Germany. 




150 



"Sandinistas defeated" 



Against most predictions the 
presidential and legislative elec- 
tions held on February 25, 1990, in 
Nicaragua were won by the Na- 
tional Opposition Union (UNO), 
whose presidential candidate, Vi- 
oleta Barrios de Chamorro, ob- 
tained 55 percent of the vote. The 
incumbent president, Daniel Orte- 
ga, won 40 percent of the vote as 
the candidate of the Sandinista Na- 
tional Liberation Front (FSLN). 

The electoral campaign, which 
had begun on December 4, ended 
on February 21, and was attended 
by an estimated 2,500 international 
observers. Both sides fought inten- 
sive and costly campaigns and most 
opinion polls showed the FSLN well 
ahead of UNO right up to the last 
minute. 

At the end of his campaign, Or- 



tega announced that it was time to 
"put away the olive green" and 
expressed the hope that the elec- 
toral process would "open a new 
chapter in cooperation between the 
USA and Nicaragua." President 
George Bush said on February 25 
that relations could improve if the 
elections were judged to have been 
free and fair. 

The conduct of the elections was 
universally praised by international 
observers as free and fair. Ortega 
conceded the defeat of the FSLN, 
after 10 years in power, in a dig- 
nified speech on February 26, after 
the Supreme Electoral Council had 
declared the results. The greatest 
victory for the Sandinistas, he said, 
was that a new path was opening 
for the Nicaraguan people without 
war and where national interests 



would prevail over interventionist 
policies. "We the Sandinistas," he 
said, "have given Nicaragua this 
democracy and peace." 

Chamorro, who was due to take 
office for a six-year term on April 
25, asserted that there were "no 
victors and no vanquished" and 
that the elections showed the desire 
of Nicaraguans to live in democ- 
racy, peace and liberty. She prom- 
ised that there would be "no more 
political prisoners, no more exiles, 
no more land confiscations" and 
also to respect the will of the 40 
percent who had not voted for her. 

Chamorro, 60, was the widow of 
Pedro Joaquin Chamorro, whose 
murder in 1978 had sparked 
events which led to the Sandinista 
Revolution and the overthrow of 
the Somoza regime in July 1979. 



She had been a member of the 
original revolutionary junta formed 
in 1979, but soon came to oppose 
the Sandinistas. 

President George Bush said on 
February 26 that the Nicaraguans 
had chosen "democracy and hope 
over totalitarianism and despair." 
He congratulated Ortega on his 
conduct of the elections and called 
for a ceasefire in the Contra War, 
stating that "given the clear man- 
date for peace and democracy 
there is no reason for further mil- 
itary activity from any quarter." 
The U.S. also announced that the 
economic embargo imposed by 
President Reagan in May 1985 
would be lifted following Chamor- 
ro's inauguration. 



v 



Jl IP 
* % 




H 



4< 



151 




"Gorbachev Becomes President" 



The Congress of People's Dep- 
uties on March 13, 1990, approved 
the creation of the post of president 
of the USSR, with extensive ex- 
ecutive powers. Two days later it 
elected Mikhail Gorbachev to that 
post. This marked a watershed in 
the transfer of political decision 
making in the Soviet Union from 
the Communist Party (CPSU) to the 
state leadership. 

The creation of the new pres- 
idency had been among the radical 
proposals announced by 
Gorbachev at a meeting of the CP- 
SU central committee on February 
5-7 as part of a draft new party 
platform. The proposal was en- 
dorsed at a meeting of the Supreme 
Soviet Presidium chaired by 
Gorbachev on February 12. How- 
ever, when the Supreme Soviet 
convened for its third session, the 
Presidium unexpectedly failed to 
obtain the necessary two-thirds ma- 
jority for a proposal to call the 
Congress of People's Deputies into 
emergency session by the end of 
February to make the necessary 



constitutional changes. 

Gorbachev had stressed the ur- 
gency of creating the new pres- 
idential system in order to safe- 
guard democratization and 
perestroika. Alluding to the mul- 
tiple crises of inter-ethnic and na- 
tionalist strife, collapsing Commu- 
nist Party support, economic chaos 
and a greatly increasing incidence 
of crime, he asserted: "Today is the 
time to decide all these questions. 
More time could finish off the coun- 
try." Misgivings had been ex- 
pressed by many deputies, how- 
ever, about allowing less than two 
weeks for preparation and discus- 
sion of such an important piece of 
legislation. 

The Supreme Soviet on Febru- 
ary 14, nevertheless, supported a 
compromise proposal by 
Gorbachev that it should return to 
the question, and on February 27, 
it approved in principle a draft bill 
on creating an extraordinary Con- 
gress. These votes came after a 
long and stormy debate; some dep- 
uties warned of the dangers of dic- 



tatorship because the proposed 
new presidency lacked an ade- 
quate system of checks and bal- 
ances by the legislature, and ar- 
gued that a switch to presidential 
rule was premature. In the debate, 
Gorbachev had at times 
unashamedly used his position as 
Supreme Soviet Chairman to bully 
and cajole deputies into accepting 
his arguments about the precari- 
ousness of his reform programs and 
the urgent need to "enhance the 
mechanism of executive authority, 
in order to ensure that laws work." 

The Congress of People's Dep- 
uties session convened on March 
12. The whole of the first day was 
taken up with debate on the new 
presidency again featuring accusa- 
tions by radical deputies of the po- 
tential for authoritarianism and dic- 
tatorship. Against Gorbachev's 
wishes, a vote on the issue had to 
be postponed until the following 
day. Meanwhile, intense lobbying 
was reported of deputies from Es- 
tonia, Georgia and other strongly 
nationalist-minded republics who 



were threatening to boycott the 
vote on the grounds that strength- 
ening centralized executive author- 
ity ran counter to recent official 
proposals for restructuring the So- 
viet Union into a looser confeder- 
ation of sovereign republics. The 
session itself was boycotted by 
most deputies from Lithuania, re- 
flecting that republic's independ- 
ence declaration of the previous 
day. 

The Congress voted on March 
13 in favor of the law establishing 
the post of president of the USSR 
by 1,817 to 133 with 61 absten- 
tions. It appeared that the majority 
shared in the assessment, voiced by 
Prime Minister Ryzhkov, that a 
"strong presidency is essential to 
prevent a vacuum in authority," 
given that "the power of the Com- 
munist Party is waning, while the 
government executive is not used 
to working with the new system." 

Gorbachev was elected presi- 
dent of the USSR by a secret ballot 
of Congress deputies on the eve- 
ning of March 14, 1990. 



152 



East Germans Remove Honecker" 





DOWNFALL OF 
HONECKER 

A visit by Soviet 
President Mikhail 
Gorbachev to the Ger- 
man Democratic Re- 
public for the coun- 
try's 40th anniversary 
on October 7, 1989, 
acted as the catalyst 
for the resignation on 
October 18 of the East 
German leader Erich 
Honecker after 18 
years in power. Pres- 
sure for democratic re- 
forms had been grow- 
ing and continued to 
grow in the light of the 
radical changes being 
introduced in Hunga- 
ry, Poland, and the So- 
viet Union, while thou- 
sands of East Germans 
fled to the Federal Re- 
public of Germany. 
Faced with this crisis 
of confidence, both in 
the country and in the 
ruling Socialist Unity 
Party, Honecker's suc- 
cessor, Egon Krenz, 
progressively intro- 
duced reforms while 
continuing to stress 
that socialism in East 
Germany was not ne- 
gotiable. 



153 



"Bennett Leads War on Drugs" 



DRUG WAR 

The director of the 
Office of National Drug 
Control Policy, William 
Bennett, unveiled on 
April 10, 1989, emer- 
gency measures to deal 
with the worsening cri- 
sis in Washington, D.C. 
In 1989, Washington 
had recorded 107 homi- 
cides by mid-March, al- 
most twice as many as 
in the same period of 
1988. Some 60 percent 
of its record 372 mur- 
ders in 1988 were, ac- 
cording to police, relat- 
ed to illegal drug use, 
much of which involved 
cocaine and its highly 
potent and addictive de- 
rivative, "crack." Offi- 
cials of the Office of Na- 
tional Drug Control 
Policy hope to make 
Washington a test case 
for the nation; demon- 
strating how the drug 
problem will be fought. 

Announcing his unit's 
plans, Bennett said that 
drug-related violence in 
Washington was "out of 
control," and openly at- 
tacked the city admin- 
istration, saying that 
"for too long and in too 
many respects the D.C. 
government had failed 
to serve its citizens." 




154 



Former Dissident Becomes President of 

Czechoslovakia" 




Vaclav Havel, the play- 
wright and leading human 
rights activist who had 
been convicted on Febru- 
ary 21, 1989, for his part 
in demonstrations in 
Prague in mid-January, 
who had been arrested 
many times prior due to 
his opposition to the 
Communist regime, and 
who had himself, because 
of his imprisonment, been 
the cause of many dem- 
onstrations, was elected 
president of Czechoslova- 
kia on December 29, 
1989. 

His election was one of 
the highlights of the 
downfall of the Commu- 
nist regime in Czechoslo- 
vakia during the fall and 
winter of 1989. An up- 
surge in mass street pro- 
tests in November, 
spurred by the events in 
East Germany, led in only 
a week to the resignation 
of the general secretary of 
the Communist Party, and 
a majority of the Party 
leadership. Leaders who 
remained in their posts 
entered into discussions 
with the protestors and 
promised democracy. De- 
mocracy, however, came 
sooner and more fully 
than the Communists 
might have imagined 
when massive protests 
continued, leading to the 
formation of a govern- 
ment comprised mainly of 
non-Communists . 



155 



.a 
■ 



"Noriega Apprehended" 



At a United States base in Pan- 
ama, U.S. authorities on December 
20, 1989, installed Guillermo En- 
dara as Panama's head of state and 
immediately afterwards, mobilized 
23,000 troops with massive air sup- 
port to remove from power Gen- 
eral Manuel Noriega, Panama's 
self-appointed leader, and his re- 
gime. The U.S. decision to inter- 
vene followed the Panamanian Na- 
tional Assembly's December 15 
declaration making Noriega the for- 
mal head of government, with wide 
powers, and Noriega's announce- 
ment that Panama was in a state of 
war with the USA. The decision 
was also apparently influenced by 
events on December 16 involving 
the killing of an off-duty U.S. ma- 
rine by members of the Panama- 
nian Defense Force (PDF), and vi- 
olence and threats against another 
U.S. soldier and his wife. 

The PDF and the pro-Noriega 
Dignity Battalions resisted the in- 
vasion strongly and the fighting, 
which was initially heavy, resulted 
in many casualties. General Colin 
Powell, chairman of the Joint 
Chiefs of Staff, announced on De- 
cember 20 that Noriega had been 
"decapitated" from the leadership 
of the country. U.S. forces in fact 
failed to capture him, however, and 
the U.S. government offered a re- 
ward of $1,000,000 for information 
leading to his arrest. He was later 
found to have taken refuge on De- 
cember 24 in the papal nunciature. 

President George Bush ex- 
plained on television early on De- 
cember 20 that, following the two- 
year crisis in Panama and the re- 
cent attacks against U.S. citizens, 
he had ordered action to restore 
democracy, to protect the Panama 
Canal, to safeguard the lives of the 
35,000 U.S. citizens in Panama, 
and to bring Noriega to justice. He 
announced the resumption of aid to 
the new Panama government and 
the return of the U.S. ambassador 
who had been recalled in May 
1989. 




156 



"Hurricane Hugo SLAMS Carolina Coast' 9 



HURRICANE HUGO 

Hurricane "Hugo," es- 
timated as one of the 
fiercest storms in the re- 
jgion for a decade, caused 
i widespread devastation in 
the northeastern Caribbe- 
an and the southeastern 
U.S. September 17-23, 
1989. 

The hurricane, with 
winds of up to 140 mph, 
formed in the Atlantic 
Ocean and first crossed 
land over the islands of 
Guadeloupe and the Lee- 
ward islands. Six people 
were reported killed, 



10,000 people made 
homeless, crops were de- 
stroyed, and the islands' 
main airport was tempo- 
rarily closed. The center 
of the storm passed over 
the island of Montserrat, 
killing 10 people, destroy- 
ing the main hospital, 
blocking the airport run- 
way, and removing the 
roofs of most houses. The 
storm continued north- 
west over the Virgin Is- 
lands, causing serious 
damage to the U.S. Is- 
lands of St. Croix and St. 
Thomas before striking 



the eastern coast of Puer- 
to Rico. An estimated 25 
people were killed on 
Puerto Rico and 100,000 
left homeless; there was 
widespread flooding and 
disruption of essential 
services. 

After Puerto Rico, the 
path of the hurricane 
veered away from the Do- 
minican Republic and 
passed over the sea be- 
fore crossing the coastline 
of the U.S. on September 
22-23 close to Charles- 
ton, South Carolina. 
Housing in both the city 



of Charleston and the coast- 
al towns in the area was 
badly damaged. Five people 
were killed and services 
were disrupted. 

The U.S. government an- 
nounced $5,000,000 in im- 
mediate emergency aid for 
Puerto Rico and the U.S. 
Virgin Islands. Part of South 
Carolina was also declared a 
disaster area after the hur- 
ricane hit the mainland. Re- 
ports of looting in St. Croix 
prompted the U.S. govern- 
ment to send detachments 
of military police to the is- 
land to restore order. 



157 



"Solidarity Triumphs over Polish Communists" 



POLAND 

Nearly 45 years of 
communist monopoly 
on political decision 
making in Poland 
ended on August 24, 
1989, when the Sejm, 
the lower house of the 
National Assembly, 
elected as Prime 
Minister Tadeusz 
Mazowiecki, a leading 
member of the Solidar- 
ity Trade Union. He 
was mandated to form 
a Solidarity-led coali- 
tion government em- 
bracing all four main 
parties in parliament. 
This represented the 
culmination of 17 re- 
markable days during 
which, on the initiative 
of the Solidarity Chair- 
man Lech Walesa, 
there took place what 
was effectively a com- 
plete realignment of 
Polish politics and the 
dismantling of the gov- 
ernment coalition in 
power since the end of 
the Second World 
War. 



158 




Dubcek Vindicated" 



Alexander Dubcek, 
the Czechoslovak 
Communist Party lead- 
er responsible for 
the 1968 "Prague 
Spring" reforms, 
made a triumphant ap- 
pearance at a rally of 
over 250,000 in 
Wenceslas Square in 
Prague on November 
24, 1989, having 
reemerged only two 
days before at a rally 
in Bratislava to make 



his first public speech 
in Czechoslovakia in 
20 years. Dubcek told 
the ralliers: "We have 
been too long in the 
darkness. Once al- 
ready we have been in 
the light, and we want 
it again." Dubcek was 
referring to the days of 
his administration in 
1967 and 1968, when 
he instituted reforms 
which have been com- 
pared to what 



Gorbachev is doing to- 
day in the Soviet Un- 
ion. His reforms were 
seen as a threat by 
then Soviet President 
Leonid Brezhnev who 
ordered an invasion by 
Warsaw Pact Forces 
which crushed what 
has been called the 
"Prague Spring" and 
removed Dubcek from 
power. 

This address by 
Dubcek highlighted 



the renewed commit- 
ment of the people of 
Czechoslovakia to- 
ward pursuing democ- 
racy and ending the 
Communist monopoly 
on power. 



159 



"Lithuania Declares Independence 



The Lithuanian Su- 
preme Soviet, which 
as a result of elections 
on February 24, 1990, 
had passed firmly into 
the control of deputies 
belonging to the na- 
tionalist Sajudis move- 
ment, on March 11 
plunged the Soviet Un- 
ion into a constitution- 
al crisis when it uni- 
laterally declared 
Lithuania independ- 
ent. 

The independence 
proclamation of Lithu- 
ania took place late on 
March 1 1 as a result of 
a vote in the freely 
elected parliament. 
The proclamation took 
the form of two parts. 
First, a declaration 
stating that Lithuania's 
annexation by the So- 
viet Union was not val- 
id, and second, that 
Lithuania's original 
constitution had been 
violated when the So- 
viet Union forced the 
parliament in 1940 to 
vote for annexation by 
the Soviet Union. 

Vtautus Land- 
sbergis was elected on 
the same day by the 
parliament as presi- 
dent of Lithuania, the 
first freely elected 
head of state since an- 
nexation by the Soviet 
Union in 1940. 

160 





Revolution in Rumania" 



DOWNFALL OF were captured, and Rumanians with in- only due to his 
CEAUSESCU RE- on December 25 sufficient food and powerful and re- 
GIME they were both ex- power. The rural pressive internal 
President Nicolae ecuted after a brief systematization pro- security appara- 
Ceausescu's com- trial held before a gram had further tus, centered 
munist regime was military tribunal. alienated many of around the Securi- 
overthrown in a The Ceausescu the country's vil- tate police, 
bloody revolution regime was widely lages. It was widely 
on December 21- condemned for cor- agreed that 
25, 1989. After at- ruption and for eco- Ceausescu had re- 
tempting flight, the nomic mismanage- mained in power 
deposed President ment, which had left 

and his wife Elena the vast majority of J%/i 



Before the Department of Art moved 
into what is now the Art Center, art 
courses were restricted to the limited and 
cramped studio space of the ground floor 
of Boyden Hall. Originally the Art Cent- 
er, more commonlly known as the Art 
Building, was Bridgewater's first gymna- 
sium and was also a library. Art was 
introduced as a major in 1977 and cur- 
rently now has concentrations in graphic 
design, crafts, and more individualized 
fine arts. Courses include such medias as 
drawing, sculpture, painting, ceramics, 
and art history, where all stress individ- 
uality and creativity. The Wallace L. An- 
derson Gallery has numerous exhibitions 



throughout the year which closes with the 
Annual Student Show. The Art Depart- 
ment has over 10 full-time professors and 
a unique variety of visiting lectures to 
provide an equalling balance for the de- 
velopment of art majors at Bridgewater. 




FRONT ROW: Mercedes Nunez, Stephen Smalley, Dorothy Pulsifer 

BACK ROW: William Kendall, Patricia Flynn, Joan Hausrath, Roger Dunn, John 

Droege, John Crowe, John Heller 



FRONT ROW: Walter Morin, Walter He wit son, Dr. Shanmugasundaram, J.R. 
Brennan 

BACK ROW: Hardy Moore, Diane Peabody, Sandra Whelan, Florian Muck- 
enthaler, John Jahoda 







When wanting to find a place to study 
or just to hang out, the Biology 
Museum is a common place to find the 
biology major. Unique to the Biology De- 
partment, the museum contains recon- 
structed animal skeletons along with 
charts, diagrams, and other physical 
models. Classes range in difficulty from 
the general principle courses to more 
specific ones such as microbiology and 
cytology, which are divided between lab 
and non-lab offerings. The Biology De- 
partment has just developed a new mas- 
ters program in which students are able 
to choose from a library thesis or an 



original research thesis. Also in the works 
is a combination of the undergraduate 
and graduate program enabling students 
to begin graduate work in their senior 
year. The department feels that keeping 
the equipment upgraded is necessary for 
beneficial competition in the job market. 
In 1986, a new microtome for sectioning 
tissues for viewing in the electron mi- 
croscope was acquired. The electron mi- 
croscopy course here at Bridgewater is 
one of the keys to the Biology Depart- 
ment, where Bridgewater State is the 
only Massachusetts state college to offer 
it to undergraduate students. 



Though one of the smaller departments 
of science at Bridgewater, the De- 
partment of Chemistry is known for its 
rigorous and difficult course work. The 
department offers two major programs in 
chemistry, a concentration in biochem- 
istry and also a chemistry-geology major 
jointly with the Department of Earth Sci- 
ences. Courses such as physical chem- 
istry and organic chemistry are the most 
dreaded by upperclass chemistry majors. 
The department also gives students 



the opportunity for the application of lab- 
oratory instruments like the NMR, IR 
Spectroscopy, UV, Atomic Absorption, 
GC, HPLC, and several others. These 
experiences qualify students for graduate 
work in research, study, and teaching. 
They also prepare students for various 
careers such as medicine, dentistry, 
oceanography, pharmacy, and environ- 
mental sciences. The Department of 
Chemistry has been and is listed as such 
by the American Chemical Society. 



Department Chair-Dr. Henry Daley 




FRONT ROW: Anne Wheeler, Linda Stafford 

BACK ROW: Vahe Marganian, Henry Daley, Wilman Chipman, Joseph Pagano 



FRONT ROW: Lillian Ricci, Pat Krudson, Jacek Sulanowski, A.A. Macewicz, Ira E. 
Furlong 

BACK ROW: Reed Stewart, Vernon Domingo, Madhu Rao, Richard Enright 
NOT PRESENT: Marilyn Furlong, Robert Boutilier, Glen Miller 




So, you study rocks? This is a common 
question asked of Earth Science Majors. 
The Earth Science and Geography Depart- 
ment, however, offers much more than the 
study of "rocks and maps." Over the years, 
the department has worked actively with 
state and local agencies on environmental 
concerns along with research projects in- 
cluding radon pollution, alternative energy 
sources, and the southern Massachusetts 
coal potential. 

Working closely with other science de- 
partments allows Bridgewater to offer con- 
centrations in geology, geo-chemistry, and 
geo-physics. A joint oceanography program 



with Wood's Hole is also offered. Within 
these programs students have access to a 
wide variety of modern research equipment 
such as computers, astronomy observatory, 
seismic refraction units, cartography labs, 
spectometers, and a digitizer/planimeter. 

The department also works alongside the 
active Earth Science and Geography Club 
in organizing lecturers, international din- 
ners, and extensive trips including an an- 
nual spring trip to places like Mexico, Ice- 
land, and Hawaii. Environmental concerns 
and geographical awareness are stressed 
by all members of the department. 



The elementary education program 
provides students with the profession- 
al competence necessary for becoming 
an effective educator. Rigorous study and 
emphasis is placed on an understanding 
of how students learn and an ability to 
use various teaching techniques. Stu- 
dents successfully completing this pro- 
gram are eligible to apply for Massa- 
chusetts certification in elementary 
education. 



The department also offers a major in 
early childhood education which provides 
the students with professional prepara- 
tion in understanding child growth and 
development, curriculum planning, teach- 
ing procedures, and program evaluation. 
Students completing the program will be 
eligible to meet Massachusetts certifica- 
tion for teacher of early childhood ed- 
ucation. 




FRONT ROW: Ray Harper, Wayne Dickinson, John Jones 

BACK ROW: Vincent Worden, Margaret Joyce, Tom Wolpert, John Deasy, 
Maureen Moir, Judith Deckers, Wayne Phillips 




The Department of English strives to 
give students a strong background in 
the history of English and American lit- 
erature along with an understanding of 
great literary works. Stress is also placed 
upon the students' development in the 
ability to analyze, interpret, and appre- 
ciate what they read. With these foun- 
dations, the English majors are able to 
enter diverse careers or able to pursue 
further advanced study or training. 
Bridgewater State College English majors 
have achieved success in such occupa- 
tions as law, medicine, publishing, gov- 
ernment service, public relations, and 



philosophic thought. 

Available to the department are the 
clubs involved with reading interpreta- 
tions, writing, reporting, and more like 
the student newspaper, yearbook, Eng- 
lish club, forensics club, and the arts re- 
view. All these clubs help the English 
major enhance and strengthen skills. 

In the English Department itself, a stu- 
dent may concentrate in writing, tech- 
nical, business, expressive or even ref- 
erential writing. Teaching programs are 
also available to students wishing to 
teach. 




169 



Just this year the Department of Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation 
changed its name to what is now the 
Department of Health Promotion, Move- 
ment Arts and Leisure Studies. The 
1987-1988 school year marked the 50th 
Anniversary of the Physical Education 
major. The program was first instituted in 
1937 at the Hyannis Teachers College 
and was moved to Bridgewater during 
World War Two, when the Hyannis col- 
lege was closed. 

This year marks the 17th year for the 



very successful Children's Physical De- 
velopment Clinic. 

The department is very proud to be 
one of the most well-rounded Physical 
Education programs in the country. 
Through donations, the department has 
acquired electrocardiogram machinery, 
treadmills, lactate analyzers, cholesterol 
testing machines, and residual volume 
machines for lung analysis. In addition, 
the outdoor facilities have grown exten- 
sively. 




FRONT ROW: Edward Hart, Nancy Moses, Thomas Knudson, Christine Ontwein, 
Cheryl Hitchings 

SECOND ROW: Peter Mazzaferro, Patricia Phillips, Marylou Thornburg, Jan Harris, 
Amos Nwosu, Johanne Smith, Genevieve Fitzpatrick 

BACK ROW: Joseph Huber, Robert Haslam, Regina Gross, Marcia Anderson, Vir- 
ginia Hogg, Paul Dubois, Robert Frederick 



Raymond ZuWallack, Robert Mogilnicki, David Englund, Robert Fitzgibbons, Leo 
McGuirk 




High School, Middle 
School and Adult 
Education 



Department Chair — David Englund 



The Department of High School, Mid- 
dle School, and Adult Education pro- 
vides students with the practical knowl- 
edge necessary for becoming effective 
teachers. The curriculum includes a de- 
tailed strategies course and modes of 
teaching techniques, psychological the- 
ories, and philosophical viewpoints. 

Theory is tested and applied as many 
classes make use of role playing, mi- 
croteaching, and other group or class 
related activities. Students also gain prac- 



tical experience in this program due to 
the numerous observation hours for each 
individual class, the long involved re- 
search projects of related teenage youth, 
and the final instructional teaching prac- 
ticum. 

Even with the state crisis as it is, stu- 
dents still enter into this certification pro- 
gram and graduate with a degree in Sec- 
ondary Education under their belt. 




Where else are you able to learn the 
history of the world and then some, but 
with the Department of History. The depart- 
ment's main objectives are to contribute to the 
general education program by having history 
courses open to all students, preparing stu- 
dents planning to teach history, and offering 
advanced courses to those majoring in the 
elementary curriculum for the enrichment of 
their teaching, which will enable the students 
to do graduate work or research work in their 
field of history. Community history, history of 
high school education, and history are avail- 
able for concentrated study. 

Students who often elect to minor in sec- 
ondary education are urged to take courses 



like geography, political science, economics, 
and some behavioral science to round out 
their skills and meet the present employment 
expectations. The Department of History also 
plays a role in Bridgewater's Canadian 
Studies Program. Along with other depart- 
ments such as English and geography, the 
History Department provides a multidimen- 
sional program that is considered rigorous and 
worthy. Unfortunately, this year the depart- 
ment and college lost faculty member and 
dear friend Dr. Jordan Fiore. He taught sev- 
eral courses at Bridgewater which challenged 
all students greatly. His teaching excellence is 
appreciated and loved, and he will be missed 
by all. 



Department Chair — Gerald Doiron 




FRONT ROW: Lucille O'Connell, Benjamin Spence, Gerald Doiron, Jean 
Stonehouse, Alfred Wolff 

BACK ROW: Donald Keay, John Myers, Chester Nowak, Thomas Turner, Philip 
Silv Peter Karavites, A Oien, David Culver 



FRONT ROW: Walter Gleason, Gail Price, Abdul Sattar, Thomas Moore, Philip 
Scalisi, Jeffrey Butz 

BACK ROW: Glenn Pavlicek, Paul Fairbanks, Toby Lorenzen, John Nee, Donald 
Simpson, George Sethares 




Mathematics and 
Computer Science 



Department Chair — Philip Scalisi 



Striving to keep up with the growth of 
modern day business and industry, the 
Department of Mathematics and Com- 
puter Science prepares students for the 
challenges of their constantly changing 
fields. The department has therefore 
adopted five objectives for its curriculum: 
to introduce math as an important area of 
human thought, to prepare students for 
industrial careers, to prepare teachers on 
the secondary level, to serve the needs of 
students in the fields which rely on math- 
ematics, e.g., experimental sciences, so- 
cial sciences, and elementary education, 
and to prepare students for graduate 
study in mathematics and related fields. 



The computer science program provides 
a solid background in computers and also 
serves as a preparation for employment 
in computer applications or graduate 
work. It also helps those students who are 
seeking careers in medicine, dentistry, 
and oceanography. 

The department participates in what is 
known as MACS or the Math And Com- 
puter Science Collaboration. This is a 
program in which high school and college 
educators work with professionals in busi- 
ness and industry to exchange ideas to be 
taken back to their classrooms and en- 
hance their knowledge and teaching 
skills. 




•yhe Music Department offers a minor 
in music for students pursuing a Bach- 
elor of Arts or Bachelor of Science de- 
gree as well as courses which satisfy the 
general education requirements, and in- 
struction in piano and voice. In addition, 
there are performing organizations for 
the students who wish to take a more 
active part in music. 

Students must notify and receive ap- 
proval from the Music Department chair- 
person for acceptance as a music minor. 



A grade of "C" or better is expected for 
all music course work in the program. 

Certain music courses are sometimes 
waived providing a student consults with 
the Music Department chairperson 
and/or successfully completes proficien- 
cy tests. 

A diverse and appropriate program of 
study in music is insured when the stu- 
dent works closely with the advisor in 
course selection. 




Department Chair — Ian Johnstone 




FRONT ROW: Betty Miller, Dorothy Ferry, Jean Kreiling 

BACK ROW: David Garcia, Jacob Liberies, Ian Johnstone, Henry Santos 



FRONT ROW: David Cheney, Fran Quaglio 

BACK ROW: Edward James, Milton Boyle, Steven Sanders 




Philosophy and 
Religious Studies 



Department Chair — Fran Quaglio 




Philosophical inquiry is aimed at clear, 
logical, critical thinking about a va- 
riety of perennial human concerns. These 
include questions about values, the na- 
ture of knowledge and truth, the meaning 
of life, the understanding of experience, 
the possibility of religious knowledge and 
many others. The department offers 
courses in the main problems of philos- 
ophy, the history of philosophy, and the 
methods of philosophy as a mode of crit- 
ical thinking. 

Electives include topics in epistemol- 
ogy, metaphysics, ethics, logic and lan- 



guage, as well as other areas. Proficiency 
in a foreign language, preferably French 
or German, is recommended for those 
considering further schooling in philos- 
ophy. 

The religious studies concentration is 
offered as a minor program and com- 
bined with other departments such as 
anthropology, geography, and history to 
allow for a broad area of study. A mas- 
ters degree program is not offered in the 
Department of Philosophy and Religious 
Studies, but graduates are able to take 
approved classes for credit. 



175 




The Department of Physics strives to 
provide students with the necessary 
skills and knowledge to pursue successful 
careers in research, teaching, or further 
studies in graduate programs. Physics 
and computer electronic concentrations 
are offered along with minors in both and 
also a geophysics minor is offered jointly 
through the Department of Earth Science 
and Geography and Physics. 

Students are urged to consult early 
with the department if considering a ma- 
jor in the department, especially if wish- 
ing to complete the program in a four 
year time period. It is not unusual for any 



Bridgewater science student to take an 
extra year or semester to finish all the 
rigorous classes and laboratory work. 

Graduate physics majors from Bridge- 
water have no problem when it comes to 
the demands of a physics career. Also, 
they have a 100% record of entering 
graduate schools, since there is a short- 
age and desperate need for teachers 
across the country. The Department of 
Physics puts more of an emphasis on 
computers and electronics, modernizing 
equipment over the years so there is a 
broad spectrum to get all kinds of ex- 
perience. 



Department Chair — George Weygand 




Richard Calusdian, Marcia Webb, George Weygand, Grace Healy, Felix Palubin- 

skas 



Guy Clifford, Shaheen Mozaffar, Pauline Harrington, David Sudholter, Paul 
Michael Kryzanek 



Jean, 




Do political scientists perform routine 
experiments on government officals? 
Do they dissect politicians, to see what 
makes them tick perhaps? No, of course 
not. Political science majors are trained in 
the understanding of the political and 
governmental structures in their own 
country and in other parts of the world, 
and to develop their interest in contem- 
porary public affairs and governmental 



problems. 

Foundations for the study of law and 
graduate work in political science or pub- 
lic administration are well constructed at 
Bridgewater. International relations are 
also part of the curriculum as there are 
concentrations in international affairs and 
legal studies. An internship program in 
political science is available to all stu- 
dents. 



TPhe objective of the Social Work De- 
*■ partment is to prepare undergradu- 
ate students for beginning professional 
positions in the field of social work and 
other human services. The program will 
also prepare students for professional 
training in social work at the graduate 
level. Behavioral theory derived from 
courses in anthropology, psychology, and 
sociology compliment the instruction pro- 
vided in the social work program courses. 
The program includes a field work as- 
signment experience in social agencies, 



where students perform in some field 
specialty and report in on structured writ- 
ten assignments. Also during this intern- 
ship, the student must take a senior sem- 
inar in a related field of social work to 
relate the experiences from the intern- 
ship. 

The field experience provides oppor- 
tunities for students to learn how to apply 
their knowledge and to develop their 
skills in providing direct services to clients 
in a wide variety of community agencies, 
under a qualified agency field instructor. 




Aida Bruns, Dorothy Howard, Betty Mandell, Rebecca Leavitt, David Kemple 



FRONT ROW: Don Armfield, Sandra Faiman-Silva 

BACK ROW: Abraham Thomas, Curtiss Hoffman, Walter Carroll, Howard London 




Sociology and 
Anthropology 



We don't follow maps to buried treasure and 
never, ever does X mark the spot. Such is 
the life of world famous archeologists. The 
Department of Sociology and Anthropology con- 
centration ranges from cultural anthropology to 
criminology and third world studies. 

Anthropology provides students with an un- 
derstanding of society and cultures throughout 
the world while the sociology program gives a 
student an understanding of how social rela- 
tionships arise, why they persist, what effects 
they have and how they maintain social order or 
contribute to social change. 

The sociology majors criminology concentra- 
tion prepares students wishing to enter careers 
in the diverse area of the administration of jus- 



tice. This program introduces and sensitizes stu- 
dents to the different dimensions and expla- 
nations of crime and delinquency, as well as 
provides analysis of structural sources and the 
legislative process involved in the formulation of 
the criminal laws. 

The department also has an archeological 
laboratory in which samples and objects from 
local sites are examined and studied. In the 
summer, a field excavation course is offered 
jointly with the North River Project. Techniques 
in field recovery and primary cataloging and 
analysis of archeological materials are just some 
of the involved topics to be learned on such a 
project. 



The Department of Special Education 
offers a program designed to meet 
the needs of undergraduates who are 
interested in special education and also in 
certification as a teacher of school age 
children with moderate special needs. 
Students must also complete either the 
early childhood or the elementary ed- 
ucation program as part of the special 
education program. 

Graduate programs are available for 



the certification track and also for the 
non-certification track of study. The cer- 
tified track enables students to be cer- 
tified as a teacher for children with mod- 
erate special needs as well as a masters 
degree in special education. The program 
has been designed in accordance with the 
Massachusetts Department of Education 
Standards and must file documentation of 
undergraduate certification status. 




Tracy Baldrate, William Murphy, Alice Kirby, David Almeda 




Speech Communication, 
Theatre Arts and 
Communication 
Disorders 



The objective of the Speech Commu- 
nication Department is to provide stu- 
dents with opportunities to increase their 
communication effectiveness, to develop 
aesthetic and ethical perspectives that 
will enhance their ability to produce and 
consume messages, and to learn reading, 
writing, speaking, thinking, performance, 
diagnostic, and research skills required 
for effective functioning in a variety of 
contexts. 

Students may choose one of three re- 
lated concentrations; speech communi- 
cation, theatre arts, or communication 



disorders. Other minors are available 
such as radio and television operation 
and production in cooperation with the 
Department of Media and Librarianship. 

The department has completed an ex- 
tensive review of the curriculum and has 
renumbered, renamed, and revised 
courses to improve clarity, sequence, and 
timelines of course offerings. It has in- 
troduced an interdisciplinary minor in 
public relations, the new dance minor, 
and revised the theatre arts curriculum to 
improve professional theatre training. 




- - • 
181 



i 



REGISTRATION 




and more . . . 




183 




■ 

184 



and more and more. . . 




REGISTRATION 

185 



The ALL 



The studying all year was sporad- 
ic, as it is for most college stu- 
dents. Now it was the moment of 
truth, the night before that final re- 
search paper was due. Most of the 
class has already passed the paper in 
on time, but you HAD to have an 
extention and look at you now. It was 
just the beginning for you. 

The Maxwell Library was your first 
stop. Rushing up and down the card 
catalogue grabbing any books, texts, 
or magazine articles that seldomly re- 
semble the topic at hand. As your 
head throbs once again and exhaus- 
tion begins to show its early symp- 
toms, you panic as most of your 



friends are leaving the library. Slowly 
you collect your materials and head 
out for your dorm room, all the time 
trying to keep calm and relaxed. "I 
only need this class to graduate," you 
told yourself as your stomach muscles 
tensed up. 

It was 8:00 p.m. and you had a long 
way to go for a research paper. At 
first typing was slow but your gram- 
mar seemed to flow right along, often 
checking spelling and punctuation as 
you continued to struggle on. 

The soda machine was wiped out 
by all your washing money. "Wise 
investment," you convinced yourself. 
GULP, GULP, GULP.. ..one, two, 



three, cans downed and the caffeine 
fix sets in and you proceed onward. 

It's 11:30 p.m. and mistakes be- 
come common for you, and frustra- 
tion has overcome you. By 1:40 a.m. 
fatigue is beginning to win and wrin- 
kled pieces of trash look good if they 
were just ironed out. 

2:19: a quick nap will help you 
regain your strength. Time moves on 
and a shower has revived you by 
3:45. My god it's 6:10, but you've 
finished. Now it's time for that beer 
you've set aside as a reward when the 
paper was completed. 
GULP,GULP,GULP. . . . A AAAH! 




186 



NIGHTER 





188 





NIGHTER 



189 



BRIDGEWATER STATE COLLEGE 
Bridgewater, Massachusetts 02325 



Office of the President 



508/697-1201 



Message to the Class of 1990 



Dear Members of the Class of 1990: 

It is my sincere pleasure to congratulate you on having completed your 
academic work at Bridgewater State College. Now you are a graduate and 
have earned a degree that reflects your commitment to intellectual growth 
and development. This is an important milestone you have achieved. No 
doubt, much sacrifice and energy and determination were required of you in 
the process. What you have gained are the multiple advantages of being an 
educated person in modern society. 

As you finished your last year as students, my first year as President was 
drawing to a close. You and I therefore share a strong bond and your class 
will forever be a special class in my eyes. This last year for you, and this first 
year for me, has had some unusual difficulties associated with it in terms of 
budget cuts and other fiscal problems, but our spirits have never flagged. On 
the contrary, that wonderful Bridgewater spirit, forged over the course of 
150 years of distinguished public service, continues to invigorate our 
campus community. 

That spirit, rooted in the College's oldest traditions, goes with you now 
to be carried with enthusiasm into your personal and professional lives. I 
wish you all good fortune and happiness, and I hope you will retain close ties 
with your alma mater in the years to come. 

For Bridgewater State College, I hope that future years will see us reap 
the dividends of our efforts to promote academic excellence, to expand the 
diversity of our students and faculty, and to develop more opportunities to 
perform our public service mission in the southeastern Massachusetts 
region. 

Again, congratulations on a mission accomplished and a job well done. 
Be proud of your accomplishments here. You have justly earned that 
privilege. 



Sincerely, 




Adrian Tinsley 
President / 



/ 




Office of Administration 
and Finance 

Liz Sironen, Lucy Cummings, Linda Wright 




Office of 
Admissions 



FRONT ROW: Nanette Baines, Marian Spen- 
cer, Pegge Powers, Rosalie DeTerra 
BACK ROW: D wight Cook, Janet Taylor, Paul 
Bonito, James Plotner, Ann Ferris 




192 




Office of 
Administrative Services 

Nancy Wallenmaier, Gina Guasconi, David 
Morwick, Geraldine Bunavicz 



Office of Affirmative 
Action and Minority 
Affairs 

Joanne McKee, Paul L. Gaines 



Office of 
Alumni Relations 

FRONT ROW: Shirley Hogan, Mary Freeman 
BACK ROW: Ashley McCumber, Kim Williams, 
Philip A. Conroy, Ralph Fletcher 



193 



■ 



urnell School 



FRONT ROW: Carol A. Nicholeris, Renee 
Ladurantaye, Ruth Fitzpatrick, Nancy Os- 
borne, Charles Robinson, Louis J. Taris 
SECOND ROW: Sara L. Pheeney, Jean Comita, 
Lydia A.Gerhardt, Noreen Asci 
THIRD ROW: Susan L. Rudden, Shirley A. 
Wood, Marjorie Teitelbaum, Steve Traw, Betty 
Noyes 

BACK ROW: Quan Zhen Shi, Rich Gopen, 
Jaime Daley-Reid, Steven R. Greenberg, Deb- 
bie Waterman, Richard Deschenes, Christine 
Leland 




Campus Center Staff 



FRONT ROW: Marianne Langello, Donna Nick- 
erson, Pamela Gallo, Betty Ann Wray 
BACK ROW: Mary Elizabeth Butler, Mary Edg- 
ington, Mark Johnson, Rick Veno, Pam Ar- 
righi, Elaine Wambolt, Jane Donovan 




Office of Career 
Planning and Placement 



Denny Ciganovic, Jean Lyons, Sheila Davis, 
Donna Esposito 





Copy Center 



Gerry Perron, Gerry Krappe 



Counseling Center 



Lila Annaloro, Daniel R. Diethelm, Susan 
Zeichner 



Office of 
Financial Aid 

FRONT ROW: Arlene Morin, Pegge Powers, 
Marian MacDonald, Sally Hampton 
BACK ROW: Gerard V. Stenerson, Maureen 
Bicknell, David W. Janey 



195 



1 



Graduate School 



Ronald Pariseau, Mary MacPherson, Marilyn 
Barry, Paul Wright 



Information 
Services 



FRONT ROW: Aretha Wang, Barry G, Crash 
Filippini 

SECOND ROW: Alice B. Jette, Kim and Co. 
BACK ROW: Scott Frampton, Billy Idol, Jimmy 
Garcia, Bob Clampton 





-\ w /- *m Library Staff 




FRONT ROW: Sheau-Hwang Chang, Shirley E. 
Libby, Carol Neubauer, Adeline Ziino, Shu- 
chen Tu, Gail Hall, M. Rita Drummond, S. 
Mabell Bates, Kathleen Nerney, Olga Bi- 
anchini, Nilda Poe'Sepp, Teri Moccia 
BACK ROW: Kevin E. Manning, Mary H. Myers, 
Carmela Ferioli, Joe Burns, Virginia Deknis, 
Deborah Stone, Owen T.P. McGowan, Ratna 
Chandrasekhar, Shirley M. Zeiba, Madeline 
Moore, Cynthia Webber, Robert M. Simmons, 
Robert M. Dunn, Dorothy Crosman, Ken Moore 



Mailroom 



Diane Piquett, Shirley Wilbur, Brenda Lawton, 
Erin Senier, Maureen Regan 



Office of Personnel 
and Payroll 

Mary Hogan, Melinda McCrae, Margarida 
Vieira, Peter Tsaffaras, Sally Stewart, Janet 
Mclsaac, Carolyn Ames 



197 



President's Office 



Pamela Parsons, Patricia Amaral, Adrian Tin- 
sley, Elizabeth Anneseley 




Office of 
Public Affairs 



David Wilson, Roberta Harris, Marie Murphy, 
Michael Storey 




Registrar's Office 



FRONT ROW: Nancy Clay, Dennis Bicknell, 
Thomas Chaffee 

BACK ROW: Joan Schlatz, Leona Mazzoleni, 
Ronald Perry, Dawn Wentworth, Peg Mercier 





Office of 
Student Payment 



FRONT ROW: Jeanne Driscoll, Sue Hickey, 
Clare Werner 

BACK ROW: Valerie Cabral, Elaine Spacco, 
Barbara Russek, Janet Prodouz 




Office of 
Student Services 

Betty Sprague, Martha Jones, Rita Ovellette 



Vice President of 
Administration and Finance 

Joseph B. Chicarelli 



j 150 



199 




Football 



"The Bridgewater State College 
Bears had their best season ever 
since the inception of the program in 
1960. They finished the year with a 
nine - one record which included win- 
ning the NEFC Championship game 
and playing in the ECAC North Cham- 
pionship game for the first time ever. 
During this season numerous individ- 
ual and team records have fallen by 



the wayside. BSC Coach Peter Maz- 
zaferro was honored for his outstand- 
ing efforts by his fellow New England 
Football Conference coaches by being 
named the NEFC "Coach of the 
Year," the second time he has re- 
ceived the award. He and his players 
should all be congratulated on an out- 
standing season this year. 




1990 FOOTBALL TEAM 

Front (1-r): Tom Scavitto, Chris Concheri, Jeff Lane, David Gillis, Peter Maroon, Tom Egan, Jack Dillon, 
David Adams, Steve Ditria, Mark Sarkisian, Sean Frazier, Bill Macri. Second: Ed Shea, Jack Quinlan, Jim 
Mello, Chris Coyne, Rick Weirnold, Glenn Gonsalves, Ripp Charters, Mark Goldman, Mike Henrick, Sean 
Tiernan, Mike Lam son. Sean Connor, Jorge Orta. Third: Matt Jardin, Neil Crowley, Paul Burke, Jerry 
McGrath, Bill Capplis, Paul O'Donnell, Richard Crossman, George Bourguignon, Steve Dennehy, Mark 
Benigni, Kevin Deinberg, Eric Cedrone, Marc Angelini, Eric Leete. Fourth: Wayne Clark, Scott Trepanier, 
Bill Griffin, Brian Richards, Brendan Regan, Brian Herlihy, Chris Rogers, Gary King. Tom Keleher, Eric 
Kotchian, Brian McCarthy, Nosa Owens, Tom Cuddy. Fifth: Jim Mullaly, Trent Bartlett, Paul Piccioli, Leo 
Stepherson, Kevin Farley, Jamie Maciel, Clint Cabral, Leonard Fontes, Dave Hathaway, Thomas Black, 
Kevin Williams, Jim Shaffer. Sixth: Gary Cambra, Chris Pavao, Jim Demopoulos, Jay Eggers, Jesse 
Hammond, Stephen Peppard.(AT) Heidi Ulrich, Amy Sullivan Ken Johnson, Matt Gerken. Seventh: David 
Burns, John Fournier, Peter Mazzaferro, Larry Frazier, Joe Verria, Rich Florence. 



202 



Field Hockey 



"J" he Bridge water State Field Hockey 
team ended the year as a finalist in 
the EC AC Division HI Championships. 
After gaining a berth in the tourna- 
ment as the #6 seed, the Lady Bears 
went on to defeat Bowdoin two to 
one, and Williams two to one before 
bowing to Tufts in the championship 
finals, four to one. 



The team's selection to the ECAC 
Tournament marked the eleventh 
straight season the Bridgewater State 
Field Hockey program has played in 
the post-season tournament. Coach 
Sue Crosby-Tangen and the team 
should be congratulated for a job well 
done this year. 




1990 FIELD HOCKEY TEAM 

Kneeling (1-r): Karen Doyle, Marilyn Gomes, Peg Marini, Kristen Douthwright, Tricia Cullen, Kathy 
McGough, Andrea Erickson, Kathleen Carney, Melinda Moleon, Hillary Clark, Kathleen Moore, Dawn 
Massey. Standing: Cynthia Cappello, Joanne Smith, Martha Wall, Megan O'Connell, Nicole Brunelle, Leann 
Leonardo, Winnie McGarry, Randi Cote, Meg Doherty, Sarah Darney, Heather Carreiro, Karen McAvoy, Sue 
Crosby-Tangen . 



Men's Soccer 



"phe Bridgewater State College 
Men's Soccer Team was selected 
to the ECAC Division III Tournament 
this year, a first for the Bears' pro- 
gram. In the semifinals, Bridgewater 
lost five to zero to Williams College, 
which eventually went on to beat Am- 
herst in the championship finals. 
Overall, Bridgewater State ended 



the year with its best record in ten 
years. The team was led by a standout 
freshman named David Son from 
Brockton who broke all the BSC scor- 
ing marks in his first year with thirty- 
six points and fourteen goals. Second 
year coach Dennis Lukens did a super 
job getting this team ready this year. 




1990 MEN'S SOCCER TEAM 

Kneeling (1-r): Carlo Urciuoli, Scott Kiernan, Chris Joyce, Dave Floeck, Nuno Melo, Dacid Olson, Frank 
Cunha, Todd Farley, Jeff Forbes. Standing: Dennis Lukens, Paul Amaral, Mike O'Connor, Jim Daley, Joe 
Bonanno, Claudius Thomas, Kurt Schuhwerk, Eric Theroux, Derek Picariello, David Son, Domingos Leal, 
(Trainers) Maggie Shields, David Allen, Heather Swedis 



210 



Women's Soccer 



"phe Bridgewater State College 
Women's Soccer Team had its 
best season ever in the program's 
three-year history and just missed be- 
ing named to the ECAC tournament 
this year. 

The Lady Bears were led by senior 
Kara Kennedy who led the MASCAC 



conference in scoring with eighteen 
goals and forty-one points. She also 
became Bridgewater's all-time scoring 
leader this season. BSC Coach Patti 
Morano is very optimistic about the 
team's chances next year, as she will 
lose only three players from this 
year's team. 




1990 WOMEN'S SOCCER TEAM 

Kneeling (1-r): Marie Farrar, Lisa Ferranti, Elaine DesRoches, Cindy Uglevich, Kerri O'Rourke, Kara 
Kennedy, Karen Calabrese, Maria Antoniou, Jennifer Murphy, Amy McManus, Deb Hidenfelter. Standing: 
Pam Gould, Patricia Morano, Christine Cleary, Tanja Petroni, Elizabeth Purple, Colleen Grady, Mario 
Montessi, Michelle McCauley, Buffy Comeau, Colleen Conley, Melissa Goding, Laurie Govini, Julie Blan- 
chard, Kerri Mattson, Lisa Wilson, (Trainers) Joe Reilly, Janna Vrlik. 



Cross Country 

goth teams went through a rebuild- ented runners back competing for the 

ing year in 1989. Their outlook for Bears next season. 
1990 is a bright one with some tal- 




1990 CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 

Front (1-r): Diane Chase, Julie Guilmette, Suzanne Grechette, Beth Mosher, Leeanne Travelo. Back: Ed 
Delgado, Jeff Catania, Paul Bulman, Corey Denham, James Lawrence, Norm Atchue, Peter Boucher, Bill 
MacKinnon. 



Men's Tennis 



Dridgewater State's Men's Tennis 
Team ended the year with a .500 
record. Lone senior and four year 
star, Ho Jun Park ended the season 



with a nine and one record. The team 
expects to excel next year with the 
entire team gaining a year's expe- 
rience on the court. 





MEN'S TENNIS ROSTER 



Robert Astropoveh, David Benvissuto, Brian Clapp, Mark Fairbanks, Kevin Garufi, Steven George, Edward 
Logan, Ho-Jun Park, Jeff Rothberg, German Sepulveda, Kary Shumway, Minh-hoang Vu, Peter Waters. 



Women's Tennis 



"phe Bridgewater State Women's 
Tennis Team completed its best 
season ever with a perfect eleven and 
zero record. The team's previous best 
was a thirteen and one mark back in 
1986. 

BSC Coach Dr. Charles Robinson, 



who also doubles as the men's coach, 
had a good blend of veteran and new 
talent to work with this year. Heading 
that list were co-captains Pat Carling 
and Pam Wheeler, who played solid 
tennis all year long. 




1990 WOMEN'S TENNIS TEAM 

Front (1-r): Andrea Boucher, Pam Wheeler, Michelle Duffy, Allison Swezey, Stacey Dakai, Dr. Charles 
Robinson. Back: (Trainer) Gina DiCarlo, Laura Sullivan, Lynn Titario, Pat Carling, Michelle Comeau, Debbie 
Whipple, Kristy Freedman, Natalie Cook. 



Volleyball 



Oven though the Bridge water State 
College Women's Volleyball Team 
finished with a record below .500, the 
Lady Bears still managed to go un- 
defeated against their fellow state col- 
leges and win the MASCAC title with 



a five wins zero loss record. 

First year coach John Pina had an 
up and down year this season, but is 
very optimistic about the team's 
chances next year. 





1990 VOLLEYBALL TEAM 

Sitting (1-r): Jane Tolan, Jennifer Mosca, Cathie Karl, Maura Collopy, Kathleen Tedeschi, Stephanie Ponte. 
Standing: (Trainer) Shawn Rickan, Paula Karalekas, Charlene Casey, Tina Plourde, Laurie Collyer, Jamie 
Murray, (Trainer) Tara Dolan, John Pina. 



221 



Men's Basketball 



^fter a slow first semester start seniors from this squad, one of those 
(two-six), the Bears came back being Sean Carey, who ended his BSC 
strong at the end of the season to career with 1146 points, ranking him 
capture third place in the MASCAC eighth on the all-time scoring list, 
conference. They lost in the semifinals Sophmore center John Hickey (15.6) 
of the MASCAC tournament to Salem led the team in scoring, while fresh- 
State College. The team this year was man guard Joe O'Connor (11.8) really 
made up of primarily underclassmen, came on at the end of the season, 
with the Bears graduating only two 




Front (1-r): Chris Meane, Joe O'Connor, Mike Saporito, Mark Champagne, Sean Carey, Dhris Dion, Scott 
Ashworth. Back: Don Whitman, Todd Steiman, Sean Toomey, Jeff Nelson, Bob Aho, John Hickey, Scott 
Knief, Alex Arpas, Steve Maguire. Jorge Neves. 




I 




■ 



s 



Women's Basketball 



"phe Lady Bears advanced to the 
finals of the MASCAC tournament 
only to lose to Salem State. In that 
game, Katrina Antonellis (1.003) be- 
came only the fifth BSC player to 
reach 1,000 career points. Kathy 



Malkasian also joined her sister Lynn 
(1989 graduate) on the MASCAC 
all-conference first starting lineup. 
This leaves quite a void for expe- 
rienced players in the Lady Bears 
roster for next season. 




1990 WOMEN'S BASKETBALL TEAM 

Front (1-r): Lisa Weinberg, Lisa Orlandello, Kathy Malkasian, Katrina Antonellis, Winnie McGarry, Lian 
Bachant. Second: Ann Malinowski, Buffy Comeau, Charlene Casey, Sandi Schmirier, Connie DeVries, 
Stacey Dakai, Robin Youn, Judy Foster. 



227 



w — 

rv. 



Gymnastics 

T ady Bears of Bridgewater had a through at the end of the season with 

^ tough season due to team injuries three gymnasts qualifying for EC AC 

which included top gymnast Heather Championships at Ithaca College. For- 

Swedis who was out for the entire tunately, returning for next year's 

year. Quality performers came squad will be a good nucleus of talent. 




1990 WOMEN'S GYMNASTICS TEAM 

Front row (l-r):Brenda Glover, Melissa Branco, Back row (l-r):Shawn Rickan, Kim Berardi, Gina DiCarlo, 
Heather Swedis, Keri-Lyn Gleason, Sharon Hughes, Amy Poirier, Andrea Kelleher. 



230 



Men's Swimming 

Jt was a rebuilding year for the Men's planned for next year's swim team, 

Swim Team. The team set new the Bridge water Bears should get 

records in the 200 free style and the back on the winning track soon, 
medley relays. With more depth 




1990 MEN'S SWIM TEAM 

Men's Swim Team Roster: Paul Bonin, Marc Brassard, Jonathan LeMaire, Joseph Parlon, Kevin Purcell, 
Erick Roderick, Edward VanZandt, Michael Washburn, Erik Wells, Jeff Wheeler 




Women's SWIMMING 



"phe Women's Swim Team had one Championships at the end of the year. 

of its best seasons ever. Overall, First-year coach Kristin Legere did a 

five Bridgewater records were broken fine job with her squad and is looking 

this year. The team did quite well at forward to even better results next 

both the New Englands (173 pts, year, since she is losing only two 

17th) and EC AC (170 pts., 5th ) seniors to graduation. 




1990 WOMEN'S SWIM TEAM ROSTER 

Joanne Anderson, Brooke Burgess, Nicole Collette, Alison Cook, Tara Dolan, Maura Fitzgerald, Lynne 
Haberstroh, Kathy Johnson, Stephanie Kozowyk, Heather Lambert, Erin Lane, Michelle McMackin, Maggie 
Morse, Denise Murphy, Valerie O'Connor, Michelle Peterson, Mary Reidy, Leah Riddle, Nicole Rozanski, 
Karen Saliba, Kathleen Sugrue, Kerry Toler, Laura Tucker. 



234 



L 

i 



Wrestling 

Orst-year coach Gary Rabinovitz and showed on the mat, even though it 

A his troops struggled throughout didn't result in more wins. Rabinovitz 

this year, but still improved in the has done an outstanding recruiting job 

number of wrestlers competing for this year and looks to improve dra- 

Bridgewater. Improvement also matically in the win column next year. 




1990 WRESTLING TEAM 

Front row (l-r):Peter Barron, Eric Caldwell, Mike Crawford, Chris Mazeika, Mike Kenney, Mike Connery, 
Dan Coady, Mike Lamphere. Back Row : Christine Martin, Deborah DiFruscio, Kady Plante, Chris Jooyce, 
Bill Chapman, Mike Dunn, Bob Shinn, Joe Murphy, Jamie Marshall, Jim Cunningham, Allen Scott, John 
Heath, Tom Bartosek, Gary Rabinovitz. 



237 




Baseball 

"phe Bridgewater State College Ithaca in double elimination format. 

Baseball Team set a school record Both catcher Mike O'Donnell and 

for wins in a season with 28. Coach pitcher Mike Bruemmel were selected 

Glenn Tufts also recorded his 100th to All New England First Team, 

win in less than five years at Bridge- O'Donnell was also named to the All 

water. The Bears qualified for NCAA American team for the second year in 

Division III tourney for the second a row. Next year's squad will have a 

straight season losing to S. Maine and strong core of returning players. 




1990 BASEBALL TEAM 

Front row (l-r):Tom Zaya, Bill Gassett, Mike Tranfaglia, Jeff Chretien, John O'Leary, Mike Bruemmel, Mike 
O'Donnell, John Balutis, Steve Happas, Andy Araujo, Joe Duggan, Brad Bustin. Back row: Barney Earle, 
Mike Lookner, Ed Grueter, Jay Doherty, Darren Brandon, Doug Vadnais, Mike Marini, Tim Plante, Rich 
Grant, Mike Marshall, Joe Larson, Tim Clark, David Sheehan, Kyle Kupiec, jim Howard, Dave Malloy, Glenn 







Tufts. 






238 

. 1 











Softball 



Dridgewater's Lady Bears were se- 
lected to NCAA Regional Tour- 
nament for the third straight season. 
Coach Enabenter also picked up her 
150th win during the season. Veteran 
Cathie Karl had her best season ever 



at BSC (.470) while freshman sen- 
sation Rachel Routhier was not far 
behind at .447. The team, however, 
will lose some key personnel, but the 
team's depth should fill in any holes 
for next year. 




1990 SOFTBALL TEAM 

Front row (l-r):Deb Carreiro, Cindy Mello, Stephanie Ponte, Kim Newcomb, Cathie Karl, Judy Reid, Winnie 
McGarry, Dee Dee Enabenter, Second row:Jennifer Holmes, Rachel Routhier, Stephanie Manny, Deb 
Whipple, Elisa Stokowski, Dawn Harrington, Margot Johnson, Back row:Jodi Collins, Marie Farrar, Laurie 
Lacerte, Betty Brown, Tammy Silveira, Laurie Beaulieu, Dave Allen 



241 



Lacrosse 

^fter dropping the first four games Andrea Erickson, and Danielle Web- 
of the season, the Lady Bears ber. The team, losing only five seniors 
came back strong winning four of their to graduation, should still be strong 
next six games. The team got solid and competitive for next year's sea- 
seasons from veterans Karen Nash, son. 




1990 WOMEN'S LACROSSE TEAM 

Front row (l-r):Kelly Dixon, Elaine DesRoches, Martha Wall, Karen Nash, Melinda Moleon, Kristin Damore, 
Andrea Erickson, Megan O'Connell, Danielle Webber, Marilyn Gomes, Christine Cleary. Back row:Kathy 
McSweeney, Joanne Smith, Leann Leonardo, Heather Parsons, Kimberly Conrad, Maureen Saliba, Cindy 
McDonnell, Lisa Samarjian, Lori Settele, Roberta Taglieri, Meg Doherty, Cynthia Costa. 



244 

— , — , — 



Track and Field 



Records fell this year with three new 
ones in the individual events of 
long jump, hammer, and javelin. The 
4 X 100 meter relay also set a new 
record this year. Bridge water hosted 



two invitationals this year on the 
brand new track that was just built 
two years ago. Also, Bridgewater 
hosted Mass State H.S. Track and 
Field Championships this summer. 




1990 TRACK AND FIELD TEAM ROSTER 

John Bisazza, Gerald Bouchard, Peter Boucher, Geoff Catania, Todd Davis, Don Fitzgerald, Christopher 
Foster, Paul Gaines, Mel Gonsalves, Shane Holland, Tom Hoye, Paul Lanzillotta, Tim Mann, Bill Moniz, 
Michael Murray, Robert Regan, Daniel Simmons, John Stevens, Jesse Stots, Colin Weeks, Erik Wells, 
James Wells, Sean Whelahan, Diane Barry, Diane Chase, Buffy Comeau, Dina Dimondis, Suzanne 
Frechette, Julie Guilmette, Sharon Hamilton, Jeanne Jarrett, Courtney Jones, Kimberly Kaiser, Mary 
Kelley, Brenda Lamond, Alison Lobo, Kristen McCaffrey, Renata Medeiros, Jennifer Me Ho, Chris Munier, 
Amy Poirer, Kimberly Raynor, Kathryn Rivet, Arleen Shield, Jennifer Willett, Brenda Zellen. 



249 



RIDGEWATER j 



FIELD HOCKEY 




FOOTBALL 



GAME RESULTS(9-1) 





BSC 


OPP 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


8 


7 


UMASS-BOSTON 


35 





WORCESTER STATE 


26 


14 


FITCHBURG STATE 


30 





SMU 


35 


6 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


42 


20 


WESTFIELD STATE 


27 


7 


MASS MARITIME 


34 


14 


NEFC CHAMPIONSHIP GAME 


UNIVERSITY OF LOWELL 


14 


10 


ECAC NORTH CHAMPIONSHIP GAME 


ALFRED 


27 


30 




TEAM TOTALS 






BSC 


OPP 


SCORING 


278(27.8) 


108(10.8) 


FIRST DOWNS 


155 


117 


RUSHING (ATT- YDS) 


535-1778 


376-516 


PASSING YDS 


1312 


1312 


PASSING (ATT-C-I) 


157-73-15 


253-100-23 


TOTAL YDS 


3090(309.0) 


1828(182.8) 


PLAYS 


692 


692 


PENALTIES (NO- YDS) 


67-612 


67-504 


FUMBLES (OWN- LOST) 


49-25 


40-14 


RETURN YARDS 


645 


694 



INDIVIDUAL SCORING 



NAME 




TD 


PATS 


FG 


SAFETY 


TOTAL 


RIPP CHARTERS 




7 


29 


4 









83 


MARK SARKISIAN 




9 















54 


SEAN TIERNAN 




5 


2 












32 


TOM EGAN 




4 















24 


CLINT CABRAL 




4 















24 


JACK DILLON 




4 















24 


PAUL PICCIOLI 




3 















18 


NEIL CROWLEY 




1 















6 


LEO STEPHERSON 




1 















6 


JACK QUINLAN 










1 









3 


JORGE ORTA 















1 




2 


MARK GOLDMAN 















1 




2 


TOTAL 




38 


31 


5 




2 




278 






KICK SCORING 












NAME 




G 


PAT-PATAFG-FGA 


LG 




TOTAL 


RIPP CHARTERS 




10 


29-38 


4-6 




37 




41 


JACK QUINLAN 




1 


0-0 


1-2 




31 




3 


TOTAL 




11 


29-38 


5-8 




38 




44 








PASSING 












NAME 


G 


ATT 


C 


% 


YDS 


INT 


TD 


RIPP CHARTERS 


10 


147 


68 


.46 


1262 


14 


13 


TRENT BARTLETT 


4 


9 


4 


.44 


29 




1 





SEAN FRAZIER 


1 


1 


1 


1.00 


21 







1 


tOTALS 


15 


157 


73 


.46 


1312 


15 


14 



GAME RESULTS 

BSC OPP RECORD 



W.PJ 





1 


0-1 


S.MAINE 





1 


0-2 


CLARK 


1 


1 


0-2-1 


WHEATON 


3 


2 


1-2-1 


BENTLEY 


2 


1 


2-2-1 


PINE MANOR 


7 





3-2-1 


SMU 


2 


1 


4-2-1 


KEENE STATE 


1 


1 


4-2-2 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


3 


1 


5-2-2 


FITCHBURG STATE 


7 


2 


6-2-2 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


3 


1 


7-2-2 


WESTFIELD STATE 


1 


3 


7-3-2 


SALEM STATE 


2 


3 


7-4-2 


ASSUMPTION 


1 


1 20T 7-4-3 


ST. MICHAEL'S 


2 


1 


8-4-3 


WORCESTER STATE 


4 


1 


9-4-3 



ECAC CHAMPIONSHIP TOURNEY 



BOWDOIN 


2 


1 


10-4-3 


WILLIAMS 


2 


1 


11-4-3 


TUFTS(FINALS) 


1 


4 


11-5-3 




INDIVIDUAL SCORING 




PLAYER 


GOALS 


ASSISTS 


POINTS 


KATHY MCGOUGH 


10 


6 


16 


ANDREA ERICKSON 


4 


8 


12 


KATE CARNEY 


9 


2 


11 


KRISTIN DOUTHWRIGHT 


5 


4 


9 


DAWN MASSEY 


5 


1 


6 


MARTHA WALL 


4 


2 


6 


JOANNE SMITH 


3 


1 


4 


MELINDA MOLEON 





2 


2 


HEATHER CARRERIRO 


2 





2 


MEG DOHERTY 


1 





1 


KAREN DOYLE 


1 





1 


TOTALS 


44 


26 


70 



GOALKEEPING 



PLAYER 


G 


GA 


GAA 


SV 


SV% 


SO 


W LT 


WINNIE MCGARRY 


18 


26 


1.44 


124 


.827 


.5 


11 4 3 


RANDI COTE 


.5 


1 


2.0 


2 


.666 





10 


LEANN LEONARDO 


19 


27 


1.42 


126 


.824 


1 


11 5 3 


TOTALS 


19 


27 


1.42 


126 


.842 


1 


11 5 3 



250 



SCOREBOARD 



MEN'S SOCCER 



WOMEN'S SOCCER 



GAME RESULTS 





BSC 


OPP 


RECORD 


HOLY CROSS 


2 





1-0 


BRANDEIS 


1 


1 20T 


1-0-1 


S. MAINE 


1 


2 


1-1-1 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


4 





2-1-1 


MASS MARITIME 


4 


1 


3-1-1 


SMU 


1 


20T 


4-1-1 


UMASS-BOSTON 


2 


1 


5-1-1 


STONEHILL 





1 


5-2-1 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


1 


3 20T 


5-3-1 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


1 


2 


5-4-1 


FITCHBURG STATE 


4 


1 


6-4-1 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


5 


2 


7-4-1 


SUFFOLK 


7 





8-4-1 


WORCESTER STATE 


4 


1 


9-4-1 


SALEM STATE 


1 


1 20T 


9-4-2 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


4 





10-4-2 


WESTFIELD STATE 


2 


1 


11-4-2 


ECAC DIV. Ill 


CHAMPIONSHIPS 





GAME RESULTS (11-2-2) 






BSC 


OPP 


RECORD 


SOUTHEASTERN MASS. UNIV. 


2 


1 


1-0 


SIMMONS 


8 





2-0 


WESTFIELD STATE 


2 


1 20T 


3-0 


W. NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE 


5 





4-0 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


4 





5-0 


COLBY 


1 


1 20T 


5-0-1 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


1 


2 


5-1-1 


WPI 


2 





6-1-1 


S.MAINE 


2 


1 20T 


7-1-1 


CURRY 


3 





8-1-1 


REGIS 


3 


1 


9-1-1 


SALEM STATE 


1 


2 


9-2-1 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


3 


1 


10-2-1 


NEW HAMPSHIRE COLLEGE 





2OT 


10-2-2 


SALVE REGINA 


8 





11-2-2 



MASCAC RECORD (2-2) 
INDIVIDUAL SCORING 



WILLIAMS 



PLAYER 

DAVID SON 
JOE BONANNO 
DOMINGOS LEAL 
DAVE FLOECK 
CLAUDIUS THOMAS 
ERIC THEROUX 
NUNO MELO 
KURT SCHUHWERK 
DAN KAWASH 
DAVID OLSON 
SCOTT KIERNAN 
CHRIS JOYCE 

TOTALS 



11-5-2 









PLAYER 


GOALS 


ASSISTS 


POII 


INDIVIDUAL SCORING 




KARA KENNEDY 


18 


5 


41 








BUFFY COMEAU 


7 


3 


17 


GOALS 


ASSISTS 


POINTS 


TANJA PETRONI 


5 


6 


16 








LAURIE GOVONI 


3 


2 


8 


14 


8 


36 


MELISSA GODING 


2 


1 


5 


10 





20 


MARLO MONTESSI 


2 


1 


5 


3 


9 


15 


JULIE BLANCHARD 


2 





4 


6 


1 


13 


KAREN CALBRESE 


2 





4 


4 


2 


10 


MICHELLE MCCAULEY 





3 


3 


4 





8 


MARIE FARRAR 


1 





2 


1 


2 


4 


LISA WILSON 


2 





2 





2 


2 


KERRI O'ROURKE 





1 


1 


1 





2 


COLLEEN CONLEY 





1 


1 


1 





2 


HEATHER EGAN 


1 





1 





1 


1 













1 


1 


TOTALS 


45 


23 


113 



44 



GOALKEEPING 



26 



114 



GOALKEEPING 



PLAYER 


G 


GA 


SV 


SV% 


GAA 


SO 


W LT 


JEFFREY FORBES 


15.5 


18 


114 


.863 


1.16 


5 


10 4 2 


JOE BONANNO 


1 


1 


3 


.750 


1.00 





11 


CARLO URCIUOLI 


1.5 


3 


7 


.700 


2.00 





1 00 


TOTALS 


18 


22 


124 


.849 


1.22 


5 


11 5 2 








TEAM 










G SH 


GOALS 


GPG 


COR 


SCORING % 








BSC 18 264 


44 


2.4 


103 


.167 









PLAYER 


G 


GA 


SV 


sv% 


GAA 


SO 


W LT 


MARIE FARRAR 


15 


10 


106 


.914 


.666 


6 


11 2 2 


DEB HIDENFELTER 


1 





2 


1.00 


0.0 


1 





TOTALS 


16 


10 


108 


.915 


.625 


7 


11 2 2 








TEAM 










G SH 


GO 


GPG 


CORN 


SCORING % 






BSC 15 410 


45 


3.0 


61 


.110 









251 



BRIDGEWATER 



WOMEN'S TENNIS 



MEN'S TENNIS 



GAME RESULTS (11-0) 



GAME RESULTS(5-5) 





BSC 


OPP 


RECORD 


SALEM STATE 


BSC 
2 


OPP 
7 


RECORD 
0-1 


WORCESTER STATE 


9 





1-0 


WORCESTER STATE 


5 


4 


1-1 


SIMMONS 


5 


4 


2-0 


CURRY COLLEGE 


4 


5 


1-2 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


6 


2 


3-0 


SUFFOLK UNIVERSITY 


6 


3 


2-2 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


8 


1 


4-0 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


2 


7 


2-3 


PINE MANOR 


7 


2 


5-0 


EASTERN NAZARENE 


9 





3-3 


SALVE REGINA 


5 


4 


6-0 


SE.MASS.UNIVERSITY 


4 


5 


3-4 


SALEM STATE 


8 


1 


7-0 


UMASS-BOSTON 


1 


8 


3-5 


SMU 


8 


1 


8-0 


SALVE REGINA 


5 


4 


4-5 


ASSUMPTION 


6 


2 


9-0 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


5 


4 


5-5 


CURRY 


8 


1 


10-0 










STONEHILL 


5 


4 


11-0 











SINGLES: 



STACEY DAKAI 
LYNN TIATORIO 
PAT CARLING 
MIMI COMEAU 
DEB WHIPPLE 
PAM WHEELER 
KRISTY FREEDMAN 
ALLISON SWEZEY 



9- 2 

8- 2 
7-2 

1- 

10- 1 
5-5 

9- 2 

2- 1 



VOLLEYBALL 



DOUBLES: 

DAKAI-SWEZEY 

FREEDMAN-DAKAI 

COOK-SWEZEY 

DUFFY-BOUCHER 

COMEAU-COOK 

FREEDMAN-WHIPPLE 

WHEELER-TIATORIO 

COMEAU-SULLIVAN 

WHEELER-CARLING 

COMEAU-TIATORIO 

COOK-SULLIVAN 



5-1 
1-0 
1-0 
1-1 
1-0 
4-0 
3-2 

0- 2 

1- 
1-0 
1-0 



GAME RESULTS (11-13) 
MATCH RECORD 



ROGER WILLIAMS 
SMU 

WHEATON 
CLARK 

NORTH ADAMS STATE 

TUFTS 

WELLESLEY 

WESLEYAN 

RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 
UMASS-BOSTON 
ROGER WILLIAMS 
BABSON 

FITCHBURG STATE 
EASTERN NAZARENE 
WORCESTER STATE 
STONEHILL 
BRYANT 

SMU 
SMITH 

MT. HOLYOKE 



2- 1 

0- 2 

3- 1 

1- 3 
3-0 
0-2 
0-2 



1-0 

1- 1 

2- 1 

2- 2 

3- 2 
3-3 
3-4 



RIC INVITATIONAL 



0-2 
0-2 

2- 
0-2 

3- 2 
3-0 

0- 3 
3-0 

1- 2 
0-2 



3-5 

3- 6 

4- 6 

4- 7 

5- 7 

6- 7 

6- 8 

7- 8 
7-9 
7-10 



SMITH INVITATIONAL 

1- 2 7-11 
0-2 7-12 

2- 1 8-12 



ASSUMPTION 
REGIS 

SALEM STATE 
FRAMINGHAM STATE 



1- 2 

2- 

3- 1 



8- 13 

9- 13 

10- 13 

11- 13 



MASCAC CHAMPIONS (5-0) 



252 



SCOREBOARD 



•BASKETBALL 



WOMEN'S 



BASKETBALL 



GAME RESULTS (13-12) 






GAME RESULTS (16-12) 




SCORE 


RECORD 




SCORE 


RECORD 


TRENTON STATE TOURNAMENT 


SE. MASSACHUSETTS 


62-66 


0-1 


MUSKINGUM 


47-70 


0-1 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


79-73 


1-1 


CITY COLLEGE of NEW YORK 


96-75 


1-1 


SOUTHERN MAINE 


60-56 


2-1 








EASTERN NAZARENE 


64-56 


3-1 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


97-104 


1-2 


ROGER WILLIAMS 


85-44 


4-1 


SOUTHERN MAINE 


66-78 


1-3 


ST. JOSEPH'S 


63-68 


4-2 


SUFFOLK 


85-94 


1-4 


WPI 


60-71 


4-3 


BABSON 


82-93 


1-5 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


67-58 


5-3 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


72-82 


1-6 


EMMANUEL 


74-87 


5-4 


CURRY 


106-67 


2-6 


WESTFIELD STATE 


56-61 


5-5 


WESTFIELD STATE 


91-85 


3-6 30T 


UMASS-BOSTON 


82-59 


6-5 


UMASS-BOSTON 


69-70 


3-7 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


90-33 


7-5 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


89-73 


4-7 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


72-43 


8-5 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


50-72 


4-8 


BABSON 


57-49 


9-5 


WORCESTER STATE 


104-86 


5-8 


WORCESTER STATE 


60-73 


9-6 


NICHOLS 


97-80 


6-8 


SALEM STATE 


64-71 


9-7 


SALEM STATE 


96-90 


7-8 


FITCHBURG STATE 


63-61 


10-7 


FITCHBURG STATE 


68-60 


8-8 


CLARK 


48-76 


10-8 


WESTFIELD STATE 


89-80 


9-8 


WESTFIELD STATE 


62-60 


11-8 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


75-70 


10-8 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


85-39 


12-8 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


87-100 


10-9 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


79-38 


13-8 


EASTERN NAZARENE 


77-60 


11-9 


W.CONNECTICUT STATE 


50-69 


13-9 


WORCESTER STATE 


70-77 


11-10 


WORCESTER STATE 


63-79 


13-10 


SALEM STATE 


68-94 


11-11 


SALEM STATE 


59-76 


13-11 


FITCHBURG STATE 


89-79 


12-11 


FITCHBURG STATE 


72-63 


14-11 



MASCAC RECORD: 8-4(3rd place) 

MASCAC BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FRAMINGHAM STATE 67-59 13-11 

SALEM STATE 87-94 13-12 



MASCAC RECORD 7-5(3rd place) 

MASCAC BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FRAMINGHAM STATE 104-33 15-11 

WORCESTER STATE 73-63 16-11 

SALEM STATE 75-56 16-12 



GYMNASTICS I SWIMMING (M/W) 





GAME RESULTS 






GAME RESULTS 




SCORE 


RECORD 




SCORE 


RECORD 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


125.45-112.6 


1-0 


SMU 


156-161(M) 


0-1 


MIT 


136.75-154.55 


1-1 


SMU 


99-135(W) 


0-1 


SALEM STATE 


137.75-158.95 


1-2 


BRANDEIS 


134-96(W) 


1-1 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


137.75-144.55 


1-3 


BRANDEIS 


114 105(M) 


0-2 


BROWN 


137.75-168.90 


1-4 


REGIS 


118-166(W) 


1-2 


URSINUS 


137.8-139.1 


1-5 


CONNECTICUT COLLEGE 


48-46(M) 


0-3 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


139.25-146.20 


1-6 


WESTFIELD STATE 


170-121(W) 


2-2 


MIT 


143.4-157.7 


1-7 


SALEM STATE 


108-104(M) 


1-3 








SALEM STATE 


127-9KW) 


3-2 








HOLY CROSS 


81-1 16(M) 


1-4 








UMASS-BOSTON 


110-73(M) 


2-4 








UMASS-BOSTON 


94-70(W) 


4-2 








WPI 


154-121(W) 


5-2 








WPI 


95-170(M) 


2-5 








BABSON 


92-61 (W) 


6-2 








BABSON 


84-120(M) 


2-6 








PLYMOUTH STATE 


(W) 


7-2 




SOFTBALL 



BRIDGE 
SCORE1 



WRESTLING 



MATCH RESULTS 



GAME RESULTS(23-6) 



SCORE 



RECORD 



UNIV. of LOWELL 

UMASS-BOSTON 
PLYMOUTH STATE 
WILLIAMS 

MIT 

USCG(A) 
USCG(B) 
U.LOWELL 



38-12 

SPRINGFIELD INVITATIONAL 
27-31 0-2 
16-33 0-3 
10-41 0-4 

18-41 0-5 
S. CONN. TOURNAMENT 
6-48 0-6 
6-35 0-7 
12-25 0-8 



WNEC 3-45 0-9 

PLYMOUTH STATE TOURNAMENT (10th place) 
UMASS-BOSTON 19-18 1-9 

NORWICH 10-35 1-10 

RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 1-11 
WPI 1-12 



BASEBALL 



GAME RESULTS(28-8) 





SCORE 


RECORD 


SWARTHMORE 


11-3 


1-0 


FLORIDA INSTITUTE of TECH 


3-0/5-4 


3-0 


TUFTS 


10-2 


4-0 


SMU 


7-0/8-4 


6-0 


RHODE ISLAND COLLEGE 


11-0/7-0 


8-0 


FITCHBURG STATE 


16-3/10-6 


10-0 


WORCESTER STATE 


4-8/7-1 


11-1 


EASTERN CONN. STATE 


2-4/3-10 


11-3 


NORTH ADAMS STATE 


12-1/10-1 


13-3 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


12-3/16-1 


15-3 


SOUTHERN MAINE 


10-1/9-2 


17-3 


SALEM STATE 


5-4/12-2 


19-3 


WESTFIELD STATE 


7-1/6-2 


21-3 


STONEHILL 


4-2/3-6 


22-4 




NCAA'S 




SE MASS UNIVERSITY 


3-1 


23-4 


E. CONNECTICUT ST. U. 


1-7 


23-5 


E. CONNECTICUT ST. U. 


3-4 


23-6 



MASCAC CHAMPIONS: (11-1) 



LACROSSE 





SCORE 


RECORD 




GAME RESULTS 


FRAMINGHAM STATE 


7-6 


1-0 








A .I.C. 


7-3 


2-0 




BSC 


OPP 


HUSSON 


23-9 


3-0 




R.P.I. 


2-1 


4-0 








R.P.I. 


4-6 


4-1 


SMITH 


5 


15 


AMHERST 

DEFIANCE COLLEGE 


2-0 
9-8 


5- 1 

6- 1 


MT. HOLYOKE 


9 


18 


SALVE REGINA 


4-3 


7-1 


WELLESLEY 


9 


12 


WILLIAMS COLLEGE 


10-12 


7-2 


SPRINGFIELD 


3 


14 


SALVE REGINA 
BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


11-1 
8-2 


8- 2 

9- 2 


WHEATON 


13 


5 


BOSTON UNIVERSITY 


2-1 


10-2 


TUFTS 


3 


21 


SE MASSACHUSETTS 


3-2 


11-2 


PLYMOUTH STATE 


14 


4 


E CONNECTICUT STATE 


1-12 


11-3 


BABSON 


19 


8 


ROGER WILLIAMS 
FITCHBURG STATE 


14-1 
10-0 


12- 3 

13- 3 


HOLY CROSS 


17 


13 


FITCHBURG STATE 


7-6 


14-3 


COLBY 


3 


19 


WORCESTER STATE 


24-5 


15-3 








WORCESTER STATE 


5-3 


16-3 








MERRIMACK 


13-0 


17-3 








STONEHILL COLLEGE 


13-9 


18-3 








FRAMINGHAM STATE 


1-3 


18-4 








FRAMINGHAM STATE 


9-6 


19-4 








SALEM STATE 


2-3 


19-5 








SALEM STATE 


6-1 


20-5 








BABSON 


8-4 


21-5 








WESTFIELD STATE 


16-6 


22-5 








WESTFIELD STATE 


5-1 


23-5 








MASS MARITIME 


7-0 


24-5 








MASS MARITIME 


15-1 


25-5 








NICHOLS 


14-0 


26-5 








UMASS-BOSTON 


11-3 


27-5 








NORTH ADAMS STATE 


4-5 


27-6 








NORTH ADAMS STATE 


3-0 


28-6 








MASCAC: ll-3(tied for 1st place) 












NCAA NORTHEAST REGIONAL CHAMPIONSHIPS 








U. of SOUTHERN MAINE 


8-17 


28-7 








ITHACA 


6-8 


28-8 









254 



BRIDGEWATER 
ATHLETIC HONORS 



PETER MAZZAFERRO 
DAVID ADAMS 
NEIL CROWLEY 



PETER MAROON 
SEAN FRAZIER 

NARK SARKISIAN 

RIPP CHARTERS 

MARK GOLDMAN 



JEFF LANE 



KATHY MCGOUGH 



TRICIA CULLEN 
WINNIE MCGARRY 
ANDREA ERICKSON 



DAVID SON 



NUNO MELO 



KARA KENNEDY 
KAREN CALABRESE 



CATHIE KARL 
JENNIFER MOSCA 
JAMIE MURPHY 



MARTHA WALL 



FOOTBALL 

NEFC Coach of the Year 

NEFC ALL STAR (1st Team) 

NEFC ALL STAR (1st Team) 

ECAC DEFENSIVE PLAYER of the Week 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 

NEFC ALL STAR (1st Team) 

NEFC ALL STAR (2nd Team) 

ECAC ALL STAR (2nd Team) 

NEFC ALL STAR (2nd Team) 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 

NE WRITER'S GOLD HELMET AWARD 

ECAC HONOR ROLL (3 times) 

ECAC ALL STAR (1st Team) 

NE WRITER'S GOLD HELMET AWARD 

NEFC ALL STAR (2nd Team) 

ECAC DEFENSIVE PLAYER of the Week 

ECAC HONOR ROLL (2 times) 

ECAC DEFENSIVE PLAYER of the Week 

CRANBERRY BOWL MVP 

FIELD HOCKEY 

Sauk Valley NE Regional ALL 
AMERICAN 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (hon.mention) 

MEN'S SOCCER 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC PLAYER of the Week 
ALL New England (3rd Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
ALL New England (3rd Team) 

WOMEN'S SOCCER 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

VOLLEYBALL 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (hon.mention) 

WOMEN'S LACROSSE 

1990 BSC "Unsung Hero" AWARD 



MEN'S BASKETBALL 

SEAN CAREY MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 

BROCKTON ENTERPRISE PLAYER of the Week 
JOHN HICKEY MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 
JOE O'CONNOR MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL 

KATHY MALKASIAN MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 
KATRINA ANTONELLIS MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

ECAC HONOR ROLL 



GINA DICARLO 
MELISSA BRANCO 
BRENDA GLOVER 



GYMNASTICS 

ECAC Qualifier (All Around) 
ECAC Qualifier (Floor) 
ECAC Qualifier (Beam) 

SWIMMING 



STEPHANIE KOZOWYK BSC SCHOOL RECOED (50 Fly) 

BASEBALL 



MIKE ODONNELL 



MIKE BRUEMMEL 

ED GRUETER 

MIKE MARSHALL 

MIKE MARINI 
DARREN BRANDON 

CATHIE KARL 



RACHEL ROUTHIER 



WINNIE MCGARRY 



CINDY MELLO 

STEPHANIE MANNY 
MARIE FARRAR 
JUDY REDD 
KIM NEWCOMB 



TIM MANN 

DIANE BARRY 
COLIN WEEKS 



ABCA Northeast Regional ALL AMERICAN 
ALL New England (1st Team) 
N. E. Coaches' All STAR TEAM 
BSC ATHLETE of the Year 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
ALL New England (1st Team) 
N. E. Coaches' ALL STAR TEAM 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
ALL New England (2nd Team) 
MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 
ALL New England (2nd Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 
MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 
MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

SOFTBALL 

NSCA ALL AMERICAN (2nd Team) 

NSCA Northeast Regional ALL AMERICAN 

1990 BSC ATHLETE of the Year 

NEISSC Coaches' ALL STAR TEAM 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

NSCA ALL AMERICAN (2nd Team) 

NSCA Northeast Regional ALL AMERICAN 

1990 BSC Freshman ATHLETE of the Year 

NEISCA Coaches' ALL STAR TEAM 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

1990 BSC SCHOLAR ATHLETE of the Year 

1990 GTE Academic ALL AMERICAN TEAM 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

NSCA NE Regional ALL AMERICAN (2nd Team) 

NEISCA Coaches' ALL STAR (hon.mention) 

MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

MASCAC all conference (1st Team) 

MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

MASCAC all conference (2nd Team) 

TRACK and FIELD 

NCAA Div.HI Championship Qualifier (LJ) 
Set School Record in Long Jump 
Set School Record in Hammer 
Set School Record in Javelin 



^5° 



255 




The class of 1913 seen at its best as graduates process to receive their 
diplomas. 



Though the faces may 

change and are of 
different generations , 
the spirit lives on 



260 






Erin Adams 

Mathematics 

Susan Aguiar 

Elementary Education 

Melissa Ainslie 

Social Work 



Deirdre Akins 

Management Science 

Christian Albee 

Management Science 

Karen Alfonso 

Management Science 



Ramona Almeida 

Elementary Education 

Michael Aloupis 

Management Science 

Theresa Anastasia 

Communication Arts & Sciences 









Brian Allen 

Elementary Education 

Kerry Allen 

Management Science 

Lisa Almeida 

Early Childhood Education 







Laurie Andruk 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Deborah Arduino 

Management Science 

Karen Arena 

Communication Arts & Sciences 







Gregory Anderson 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Joanne Anderson 

Physical Education 

Thomas Anderson 

Social Work 







Kimberly Arruda 

Early Childhood Education 

Laurie Ashley 

Elementary Education 

Scott Astor 

Management Science 



Robyn Baker 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Sarah Baker 

Management Science 

Cheryl Ballow 

Elementary Education 






fa / 




,,{ 262 



Ann Barry 

Management Science 

Diane Barry 

Physical Education 

Tina Barry 

Biology 









Sheryl Bartley 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Michael Bates 

Computer Science 

William Beach 

Management Science 



Karen Beaston 

Management Science 

Kimberly Beatrice 

Psychology 

Cassandra Bell 

Management Science 









Arlene Benevides 

Elementary Education 

Marybeth Benevides 

Elementary Education 

Noelle Benoit 

Early Childhood Education 






Eileen Benson 

Elementary Education 

Jeffrey Beresford 

Elementary Education 

Tracy Berg 

Elementary Education 



Ronli Berlinger 

Management Science 

Ellisa Bernabei 

Management Science 

Andrew Bernard 

Social Work 









Christine Berthiaume 

Early Childhood Education 

Kelly Bettencourt 

Elementary Education 

Tina Bilotta 

Management Science 



Cindy Birtz 

Special Education 

Deborah Blanchard 

Elementary Education 

Herbert Blanchard 

Communication Arts & Sciences 







u m awwata— i 

264 



I 

Christopher Bogdan 

Aviation Science 

Brian Bonney 

Management Science 

Monique Boudreau 

Elementary Education 







Elizabeth Brennan 

Management Science 

Tina Bronkhorst 

Psychology 

Carol Brookman 

Social Work 







Pamela Brown 

Special Education 

Theodore Brown 

Elementary Education 

Michael Bruemmel 

Physical Education 



Steve Brunstrom 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Robert Bry 

Management Science 

Glenn Bryant 

Physical Education 









Pamela Bujnis 

Elementary Education 

Nancy Burgio 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Brian Burke 

Management Science 



Marie Burke 

Management Science 

Kelly Byrne 

Elementary Education 

Dorinda Bryon 

Elementary Education 






266 




Anthony Caramando 

Aviation Science 

Scott Carey 

History 

Sean Carey 

Physical Education 






i 





Melissa Caron 

Social Work 

Sandra Carraggi 

Management Science 

Nancy Carson 

Management Science 



267 




Eileen Cavanaugh 

Early Childhood Education 

Russell Cazeault 

Management Science 

Robert Cecil 

Management Science 





Christopher Carswell 

Psychology 

Manuel Carvalho 

Management Science 

Pamela Carvalho 

Social Work 







Thomas Chamberlin 

Chemistry-Geology 

Elizabeth Chaney 

Elementary Education 

April Chiero 

Management Science 



Kevin Chrisom 

History 

Emma Christiansen 

Spanish 

Donna Christopherson 

Psychology 




i 4 




V 




268 



Gina Ciccolo 

Special Education 

Sharon Cignetti 

History 

Beth Clark 

Management Science 









Emily Clark 

English 

Julie Clark 

Computer Science 

Ellen Clarke 

Special Education 



Steven Clemente 

Elementary Education 

Catherine Cloutier 

Early Childhood Education 

Daniel Coady 

Management Science 







A 





Jennifer Coates 

Elementary Education 

Michael Cobb 

Aviation Science 

Antonio Coelho 

Political Science 



269 



Donna Colecchia 

Political Science 

Maura Collopy 

Physical Education 

William Conard 

English 



Karyn Coffey 

Management Science 

Debra Cogliano 

Social Work 

David Colarusso 

Management Science 







Christopher Concheri 

Management Science 

Kevin Condon 

Management Science 

Steve Connaughton 

Management Science 



Eric Conrad 

English 

Anna Conte 

Psychology 

Sean Conway 

Physical Education 






270 



fe 




271 







Patricia Cullen 

Elementary Education 

Kristin Cummings 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Frank Cunha 

Physical Education 



Michelle Currie 

Psychology 

Dianne Curtin 

Elementary Education 

Janet Cusack 

Management Science 









Elizabeth Daley 

Mathematics 

Kathleen Daley 

Management Science 

Nonie Damon 

Elementary Education 



Kristen Damore 

Management Science 

Paulette Dangelo 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Christine Dares 

Management Science 







■i yy-mmaammmmm 

fi 272 




John Dolan 

Management Science 

James Domitrz 

Political Science 

Beth Donahue 

Management Science 






Donna Driscoll 

Art 

Jean Driscoll 

Physical Education 

Kristine Drobot 

Management Science 



Miriam Dumas 

Special Education 

Ronald Dumont 

Sociology 

Elaine Dundon 

Special Education 



Daniel Dube 

Management Science 

Donna Dubreuil 

Special Education 

Maria Duganiero 

Early Childhood Education 







Laurie Dunham 

Early Childhood Education 

Dale Durfee 

Elementary Education 

Linda Dutra 

Elementary Education 



Thomas Egan 

Management Science 

William Egan 

Political Science 

Paul Egersheim 

Communication Arts & Sciences 





276 



Heather Eggert 

English 

Beth Empey 

English 

Mary Engstrom 

Special Education 





Brian Farley 

History 

Keith Farley 

Physical Education 

Elizabeth Farricy 

Elementary Education 










r 



Andrea Erickson 

Elementary Education 

Wendi Fair 

Early Childhood Education 

Dianne Fanning 

Early Childhood Education 




Geraldine Farwell 

Physical Education 

Margherita Fay 

Elementary Education 

Susan Fennell 

Early Childhood Education 



277 




Cheryle Finn 

Early Childhood Education 

Stacey Fiore 

Management Science 

Mary Fisco 

Elementary Education 




Joanne Ferguson 

Sociology 

William Ferioli 

Sociology 

Eric Fernandez 

Management Science 





[OH 



Dianna Fiske 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Michelle Fitzsimmons 

Early Childhood Education 

Christine Flaherty 

Management Science 



Paula Flaherty 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Julie Flynn 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Patricia Flynn 

Elementary Education 






278 



Carolyn Foley 

Elementary Education 

Susan Foley 

Elementary Education 

Richard Fontaine 

Management Science 





1 



V 






Paula Fredriksen 

Early Childhood Education 

Lisa Furfaro 

Computer Science 

Matthew Gage 

Aviation Science 



Jacqueline Gagnon 

Special Education 

Susan Gagnon 

Mathematics 

Dennis Gallagher 

Aviation Science 








Diane Gallo 

Physical Education 

Andrew Ganley 

Management Science 

Robert Gardner 

Geography 



Paula Gibbons 

Psychology 

Andrew Gibson 

Mathematics 

Pamela Giles 

Elementary Education 



Amy Garland 

Management Science 

Christine Gates 

Physical Education 

Elfrieda Gershman 

Social Work 







V 



f 



Geoffrey Gill 

Management Science 

Kristine Gillespie 

Early Childhood Education 

David Gillis 

Management Science 



Lisa Giniewicz 

Early Childhood Education 

Dorothy Girten 

Chemistry 

Brenda Glover 

Physical Education 






280 



Sarah Glover 

English 

Michele Glynn 

Management Science 

Jeffrey Godin 

Physical Education 









Michelle Gonsalves 

Elementary Education 

Amanda Goodwin 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Ellen Goodwin 

Early Childhood Education 



Steven Goodyear 

Management Science 

Cheryl Gorgone 

Physical Education 

Maryellen Gorham 

Physical Education 









Beth Gould 

Early Childhood Education 

Paul Graceffa 

Aviation Science 

Catherine Grady 

Elementary Education 



281 



Jeffrey Graveline 

Management Science 

Charmaine Gravelle 

Management Science 

Bonnie Greenberg 

Political Science 



Peggy Grady 

Elementary Education 

Alfred Grande 

Management Science 

Carmela Grasso 

Management Science 







Deirdre Greene 

Early Childhood Education 
William Greene 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Matthew Griffin 

Management Science 



Tayna Gross 

Spanish 

Michelle Guerette 

Early Childhood Education 

Kristen Handricken 

English 



m ml 

I 




1 



r 





282 



Ronald Harris 

Psychology 

Bryon Hayes 

English 

Joyce Hayes 

Mathematics 





Tammy Hebert 

Physical Education 

James Henneman 

Management Science 

Tina Hennigan 

Elementary Education 



Joanne Higgins 

Early Childhood Education 

Mary Higgins 

Physical Education 

Kelly Hoar 

Mathematics 



Lisa Hicks 

Elementary Education 







Lynn Hobin 

Management Science 

Victoria Hodgson 

Elementary Education 

Kristen Hoffman 

Elementary Education 



James Hollister 

Aviation Science 

Pamela Holm 

Management Science 

Cynthia Holt 

Management Science 






284 



Charles Homer 

Management Science 

Priscilla Hotz 

Psychology 

Michele Houdlette 

Early Childhood Education 




I I 








Kerry Hovey 

Early Childhood Education 

Christine Howard 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Patricia Huebner 

Anthropology 



Donna Hughes 

Management Science 

Daniel Hurley 

History 

Philip Iacobacci 

Management Science 









Jere Ingargiola 

Computer Science 

Susan Jakub 

Special Education 

Matthew Jardin 

History 



285 




Sherie Johansen 

Psychology 

Alan Johnson 

Social Work 

Angela Johnson 

Psychology 



Lisa Johnson 

Elementary Education 

Patricia Johnson 

Mathematics 

Wendy Johnson 

Psychology 







Carrie Jokinen 

Management Science 

Pamela Jordan 

Elementary Education 

Veronica Jordan 

Management Science 



Christopher Joyce 

Physical Education 

Jan Marie Kane 

Elementary Education 

Anastasis Kapothanasis 

History 






286 



Michael Kenney 

Physical Education 

Elizabeth Kenyon 

Elementary Education 

Dana Khouri 

Management Science 



Kathleen Kelley 

Management Science 

Joann Kelly 

Early Childhood Education 

Stephanie Kennedy 

English 







Tracey Kielty 

Elementary Education 

Deborah King 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Suzanne Kinman 

Communication Arts & Sciences 



Cindy Kinney 

Psychology 

Lail Kinsey 

Art 

Edward Klimas 

Management Science 










K ' 288 . ' ■ ■ ■ , ' ' ; ; * « ' %#4 











Emily Lavalley 

Early Childhood Education 

Brenda Lawton 

Management Science 

Linda Lawton 

Management Science 



Brian Lee 

Auiation Science 

Margaret Lenehan 

Mathematics 

Darren Lennon 

Physical Education 






290 



Barbara Lima 

Management Science 

Susan Limone 

Elementary Education 

Diane Lind 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






Charlene Machnik 

Social Work 

Claudia Maciel 

Art 

Lisa Mackay 

Physical Education 



Jennifer Lyons 

Early Childhood Education 

Jean MacCormick 

Mathematics 

Deborah MacDonald 

Elementary Education 






Maureen Magennis 

Physical Education 

Lauren Mahan 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Susan Mahoney 

Elementary Education 



Darlene Malecki 

Management Science 

Kathy Malkasian 

Physical Education 

Melanie Maloney 

English 






292 



Cynthia Manning 

Management Science 

Kevin Manning 

English 

Susan Marble 

Physical Education 






Charlotte Marean 

Early Childhood Education 

Jeanette Marmen 

Elementary Education 

Peter Maroon 

Management Science 









Clorinda Mastromarino 

Psychology 

Lynn Mathtas 

Management Science 

lean Mattila 

'iology 



Lynne Maurer 

Elementary Education 

Victoria Mazza 

Management Science 

Donna Mbuthi 

Psychology 









Cathleen McCabe 

Special Education 

Kathleen McCarthy 

Management Science 

Robin McCarthy 

Early Childhood Education 



Victoria McCarthy 

Elementary Education 

Richard McCormack 

Management Science 

Corinthia McCray 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






294 



Debra McCrensky 

Psychology 

Leonard McCue 

Political Science 

Kristin McCuin 

Management Science 









Kathleen McGough 

Physical Education 

Deborah McGowan 

Management Science 

Tricia McKeon 

Management Science 








Michael McCutcheon 

Physical Education 

Janine McDonald 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Ian McGonnigal 

Communication Arts & Sciences 




Diane McLaughlin 

Social Work 

Jennifer McLaughlin 

Psychology 

John McLean 

Psychology 



295 




Andrew McLellan 

Management Science 

Dan McNeil 

Management Science 

James McPhee 

Communication Arts & Sciences 



Ana Medeiros 

Elementary Education 

Marcia Medeiros 

Elementary Education 

Sheila Medeiros 

Special Education 









Anne Medeirus 

Elementary Education 

Michael Meers 

Management Science 

Karen Melanson 

Computer Science 



Cindy Mello 

Physical Education 

Jennifer Mello 

Management Science 

Wendy Merrikin 

Social Work 






296 



Douglas Michaud 

Aviation Science 

Mark Miller 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Melissa Mills 

Psychology 








I p 





Ann Morrill 

Chemistry 

Allison Morse 

Management Science 

Sheryl Moss 

Management Science 



Theresa Moura 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Michelle Mowatt 

Management Science 

Dennis Moyniham 

Elementary Education 






HP 






Maureice Mulcahy 

Management Science 

Julie Muldoon 

Management Science 

Jeannine Munsey 

Elementary Education 



Christine Murphy 

Elementary Education 

Eileen Murphy 

Elementary Education 

Lisa Murphy 

Management Science 






298 



ft 



i 




299 







Patrick Norton 

Management Science 

Timothy Norton 

Management Science 

Kathleen O'Neil 

Philosophy 



Leigh O'Berton 

Elementary Education 

Amy O'Brien 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Terri O'Brien 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






300 



William ODonnell 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Christopher O'Halloran 

Management Science 

Paul Olson 

Political Science 




Sherri Ouellette 

Elementary Education 

Sandra Pacheco 

Elementary Education 

Melinda Packard 

Elementary Education 



Lisa Pascal 

Management Science 

Pamela Patenaude 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Claudine Patneaude 

Elementary Education 




Jennifer Palmer 

Elementary Education 

Diane Pankiewicz 

Geography 

Donna Parenteau 

Communication Arts & Sciences 







■ ■ - 



Wayne Pavao 

Computer Science 

Virginia Pearce 

Sociology 

Nancy Peckham 

Physical Education 



Kimberly Pelletier 

Elementary Education 

Suzanne Pepin 

Social Work 

Jim Pereira 

Management Science 




302 







Heather Pike 

Physical Education 

Robert Pimental 

Physical Education 

William Pimentel 

Management Science 





303 




Susan Pollard 

Physical Education 

Stephanie Ponte 

Physical Education 

Tracey Porter 

Management Science 







Paul Pironti 

Anthropology 

Susann Plett 

Elementary Education 

Kim Poirier 

Elementary Education 







Kelly Powers 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Maura Powers 

Physical Education 

Donna Preskenis 

Elementary Education 



Jodi Promisel 

Physical Education 

Lisa Prouty 

Management Science 

Dawn Prussman 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






304 





Colleen Raftery 

Special Education 

Cynthia Randall 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Michele Ranese 

Psychology 




Doreen Reed 

Management Science 

Judy Reid 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Lynne Reinhalter 

Communication Arts & Sciences 




Thea Richardson 

Elementary Education 

Vardis Riel 

Management Science 

Theodore Ringold 

Communication Arts & Sciences 









Kathleen Ripley 

Special Education 

Sandra Rivet 

English 

Amy Beth Roach 

Early Childhood Education 



Scott Robbins 

Management Science 

Sheryl Rokus 

Early Childhood Education 

Kelly Rooney 

Management Science 






306 



Rhonda Ross 

English 

Brent Rossi 

English 

Michael Rothberg 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






Lisa Rowe 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Matthew Rucando 

Auiation Science 

Jeanne-Marie Rusk 

Elementary Education 







Kristina Sakeilis 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Daniel Salas 

Biology 

Maureen Saliba 

Physical Education 



Felicia Salser 

Political Science 

Deanna Sammons 

Management Science 

Cynthia Sanguedolce 

Elementary Education 









Maura Santa Maria 

Social Work 

Michael Saporito 

Psychology 

Cheri Saraiva 

Elementary Education 



Elizabeth Saunders 

Physical Education 

Kathleen Saunders 

Early Childhood Education 

David Savaria 

Physical Education 






308 



Maureen Scanlon 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Pamela Schneider 

Elementary Education 

Catherine Scholfield 

Auiation Science 









Stephen Schwartz 

Aviation Science 

Wendy Schwartz 

Sociology 

Michelle Sedani 

Elementary Education 



Erin Senier 

Management Science 

Shon Servis 

Computer Science 

Sandra Shadoff 

Physical Education 









James Shaffer 

Management Science 

Cynthia Shaw 

Physical Education 

Stephanie Shaw 

Elementary Education 



309 






Donna Shea 

Early Childhood Education 

David Sheehan 

Physical Education 

John Sherman 

Management Science 



Joseph Silveira 

Aviation Science 

Donna Simmons 

Social Work 

Christopher Sissons 

History 









Colleen Slowey 

Psychology 

Allison Smith 

Psychology 

Ambrose Smith 

Aviation Science 



James Smith 

Management Science 

Shannon Smith 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Donna Solari 

Elementary Education 





310 




311 






Ueen Stone 

Elementary Education 

Christopher Storer 

Elementary Education 

Denise Stout 

Elementary Education 




Coryann Strout 

Psychology 

Lisa Studholme 

Early Childhood Education 

Kathleen Sugrue 

Elementary Education 



Amy Sullivan 

Physical Education 

Diana Sullivan 

Early Childhood Education 

Maria Sullivan 

Management Science 




Lisa Sutton 

Management Science 

Dana Svendsen 

Management Science 

Kathleen Swansey 

Elementary Education 





Pamela Sweeney 

Psychology 

Christine Sylvester 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Cari Sylvia 

Special Education 





Catherine Sylvia 

Political Science 

Deletes Tambascia 

Psychology 

Julie Tankis 

Early Childhood Education 



Jane Taris 

Management Science 

Matthew Tavares 

Psychology 

Carolyn Tetreault 

Elementary Education 






1 






Lee-Anne Thorns 

Social Work 

Laurie Thomson 

Management Science 

Jennifer Thome 

Early Childhood Education 



Jennie Tigano 

Management Science 

Jane Tolan 

Physical Education 

Jean Tolan 

Early Childhood Education 









Pamela Toland 

Elementary Education 

Cheryl Topping 

Elementary Education 

Peter Tourigny 

Management Science 



Leeanne Travelo 

Physical Education 

Lisa Tripoli 

Management Science 

Helen Tripp 

Elementary Education 






314 



Kimberly Trotter 

Psychology 

Huong Truong 

Art 

Charles Tsouprake 

Elementary Education 









Lauren Turke 

Psychology 

Kathleen Unwin 

Elementary Education 

Shariah Valcourt 

Physical Education 



Sheila Valicenti 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Karen Valis 

Management Science 

Michelle Vallancourt 

Elementary Education 









Anja VanHagens 

Physical Education 

Rita Varrasso 

Elementary Education 

Annmarie Verville 

Physical Education 



315 




Lisa Wagener 

Management Science 

Mark Wagner 

Sociology 

Dianne Walenius 

Management Science 









Janet Walker 

Early Childhood Education 

Scott Wallace 

Art 

Elizabeth Walsh 

English 



Thomas Walsh 

History 

Stephen Wands 

Art 

Pauline Ward 

Psychology 






316 



Jacqueline Ware 

Management Science 

Cathleen Warren 

Management Science 

Derek Wassel 

Management Science 







James Waters 

Management Science 

Elisabeth Wayda 

Communication Arts & Sciences 

Joseph Weathers 

Communication Arts & Sciences 




Cynthia Webber 

Early Childhood Education 

Karen Weiner 




Annmarie Weir 

Communication Arts & Sciences 






Joseph Welch 

Aviation Science 

Melinda Westerlind 

Psychology 

Jo-Anne Westgate 

Elementary Education 



317 





Pamela Wheeler 

Elementary Education 

Wendy Wheeler 

Early Childhood Education 

Paloma Wheetley 

Psychology 



Brian Whidden 

Physical Education 

Stephen Whitcomb 

English 

Virginia White 

Social Work 






319 





Rabab Abourjaily 

18 North Ash Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Stephen P. Abreu 

53 Hillsdale St. 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Nonnand L. Achin 

733 Pleasant St. 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Mary Achtellk 

269 Baylies Street 
N. Dighton, MA 02764 

Denlae D. Adamian 

23 Melvin Road 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Christine A. Adams 

P.O. Box 644 
Orleans, MA 02653 

Erin E. Adams 

11 Montello Ext. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Kimberly J. Adams 

61 Great Republic Ave. 
S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Robert J. Adams 

83 Lakeview Rd. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

James C. Aftosmes 

84 Mandalay Rd. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Susan A. Aguiar 

62 Canonicus Street 
Tiverton, RI 02878 

April G. Aiello 

106 Prospect St. 
Reading, MA 01867 

Melissa L. Ainslie 

66 Kensington Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Deirdre M. Akins 

27 Gault Rd. 

W. Wareham, MA 02576 

Mark R. Alban 

140 Oak St. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Christian S. Albee 

55 Standish Rd. 
Bellingham, MA 02019 

Margaret A. Albert ini 

1147 East St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Linda M. Alexander 

47 Ardsley Circle 



Brockton, MA 02402 

Margaret A. Alexander 

209 Algonquin St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Karen J. Alfonso 

207 Bee St. 
Meriden, CT 06450 

Roger P. Alix, Jr. 

83 Fisher St. 

N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

Brian R. Allen 

33 Anderson Ave. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Kerry A. Allen 

104 Beal St. Ext. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Angela M . Almeida 

110 Moss St. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Craig A. Almeida 

416 Highland Avenue 
N. Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Fatima M. Almeida 

466 Forest Street 

N. Dighton, MA 02764 

Ramona L. Almeida 

Pob 1955 14 16 Bay Rd. 
Duxbury, MA 02331 

Michael J. Aloupis 

138 Winslow Dr. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

David S. Ambrose 

263 Bowdoin St. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Lisa M. Analoro 

24 Empire Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Barbara L. Anderson 

95 Colonial Ter. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Dennis J. Anderson 

79 Washington St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

George A. Anderson 

P O. Box 171 95 Stillman Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Glenn P. Anderson 

12 Mitchell St. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Gregory S. Anderson 

12 Mitchell St. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Joanne G. Anderson 



242 New Ipswich Rd. 
Ashby, MA 01431 

Julie A. Anderson 

6 Cedar Dr. 

South Easton, MA 02375 

Thomas G. Anderson 

28 Longwood Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Victor L. Anderson 

4 Linden St. 

S. Hamilton, MA 01982 

Laurie J. Andruk 

300 North St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Victor J. Araujo 

49 Brook St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Deborah M. Arduino 

67 Reservoir Street 
Needham, MA 02194 

Karen L. Arena 

16 Hickory Ln. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Lisa M. Arria 

4 Brown St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Kimberly A. Arruda 

71 Pageotte St. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Michael G. Arsenault 

865 Warren Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Robert S. Arsenault 

P.O. Box 358 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Scott D. Arthur 

11 Chestnut Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Scott E. Astor 

31 Jones Terr Unit 26 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Peter F. Atherton 

S. Water St. 

S. Natick, MA 01760 

Sharon M. Ay 1 ward 

49 Elm Street 
Hopkinton, MA 01748 

Scott J. Azulay 

105 Main Street 
Kingston, MA 02364 

David A. Baker 

B2 Franklin Square Condo 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Garrett D. Baker 

104 Spring Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Robyn M. Baker 

28 Hampshire Ave. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Sarah E. Baker 

38 Vernon Street 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Cheryl L. Ballow 

20 Prospect Street 



Taunton, MA 02780 

Timothy J. Barbieri 

62 Horace Darling Dr. 
North Attlebo, MA 02760 

Basilio Barochis 

104 Norton Ave. #16 
S. Easton, MA 02375 

Lori A. Barrett 

7 Margaret Road 
Dedham, MA 02026 

R. Edward Barrett 

3 Play stead Ave. 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Ann M. Barry 

370 North Ave. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Diane M. Barry 

10 Foam Rd. 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Yves M. Barthelemy 

72 Brett St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Sheryl A. Bartley 

349 Pleasant St. 
Framingham, MA 01701 

Michael G. Bassett, Jr. 

15 Litchfield Terrace 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Michael B. Bates 

3925 Acushnet Avenue 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Erin M. Batson 

62 Milne Rd. 
Osterville, MA 02655 

Sean P. Battles 

31 Carolyn Dr. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Michael H. Baumann 

243 Lakeview Ave. 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

William E. Beach 

64 Union St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Karen J. Beast on 

25 Rebecca Rd. 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Kimberly A. Beatrice 

35 Longworth Ave. #25 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Paul C. Bebis 

675 Union Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

John T. Beggan 

9 Hillsdale Rd. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Steven R. Belcher 

110 Brandies Circle 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Cassandra N. Bell 

409 Battles Farm Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Marilyn C. Bell 

74 Dillingham Road 
Brewster, MA 02645 



Sandra L. Bell 

155 Center Street 
Carver, MA 02330 

Sharon L. Bellao 

15 Willow Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Janet M. Belief euille 

61 Maple Street 
Plympton, MA 02367 

Deborah A. Belle vue 

90 Howard St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Mark C. Be mis 

7 Lantern Ln. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Marybeth Benevides 

164 Denver St. 

Fall River, MA 02721 

Kathleen D. Benjamin 

142 Woodsbury Road 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Scott W. Bennett 

119 Pleasant St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Colleen L. Benoit 

213 Chicago St. 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Douglas J. Benoit 

357 Old Fall River Rd. 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Noelle 1. Benoit 

401 Forest St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Eileen F. Benson 

23 Heath St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Kimberley Bentley 

1002 Mohawk Trail 
North Adams, MA 01247 

Jeffrey S. Beresford 

55 Boston Rd. 
Groton, MA 01450 

Tracy S. Berg 

P.O. Box 580 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Ronli S. Berlinger 

173 Hollingstdn PI. 
E. Windsow, NJ 08520 

Ellisa D. Bernabei 

56 Coweeset Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Andrew P. Bernard 

35 Ash St. 

Waltham, MA 02154 

Christine M. Berthiaume 

21 Robin Ln. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Kelly A. Bettencourt 

69 Sandy Beach Road 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Tina M. Bilotta 

33 Carolina Trail 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Cindy A. Birtz 



320 



214 Auburn St. 

Cherry Valley, MA 01611 

Robert M. Bisienere 

P.O. Box 3356 
Pocasset, MA 02559 

Lynne S. Blaisdell 

23 Priscilla Way 
Brewster, MA 02631 

Deborah L. Blanchard 

71 Vine St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Herbert R. Blanchard 

33 Willard St. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Laureen A. Blanchard 

22 Grove St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Scott D. Blanchette 

57 Maple St. 

Attleboro Fal, MA 02763 

Paul J. Blazejowski 

554 N. Main St. 
Palmer, MA 01069 

Maurice S. Blier 

P.O. Box 773 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Janet M. Block 

4 Hillcrest Rd. 3 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Christopher B. Bogdan 

6 Jefferson Dr. 
Paxton, MA 01612 

Jennifer H. Bond 

265 Old Oaken Bucket 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Jeannine M. Bonnayer 

1 Benefit St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Brian R. Bonney 

2 Upland Road 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Krista E. Borkman 

2202 Wellington St. 
N. Dighton, MA 02764 

Christen M. Bortolussi 

3 Norfolk Lane 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Lisa A. Bouchard 

213 Belmont St. 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Monique B. Boudreau 

32 Ode St. 
Waltham, MA 02154 

James A. Boulter 

13 Pondview Ave. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Daniel C. Bourgery 

296 Lincoln Street 
Blackstone, MA 01504 

Mary H. Bourque 

22 Algerine Street 
Berkley, MA 02780 

Karen A. Bousquet 

160 Holloway Street 
E. Taunton, MA 02718 

Shirley M. Bousquin 

P.O. Box 574 

Raynham Cente, MA 02768 

Janine M. Boutin 

7 Pleasant Street 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Jonathan W. Bowden 

80 Thompson St. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Dale S. Boyle 

P.O. Box 7128 
Cumberland, RI 02864 

Joseph M. Braganca 

169 Power St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Desmond A. Brathwaite 

67 Wildwood St. 



Mattapan, MA 02126 

Michael A. Brathwaite 

67 Wildwood St. 
Mattapan, MA 02126 

Joline M. Breault 

9 Point Of Pines 

E. Freetown, MA 02717 

Kristin M. Bremberg 

24 Beverly St. 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Elizabeth A. Brennan 

147 Debbie Dr. 
Leominster, MA 01453 

Christine A. Brezinski 

1 Highland St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Glenn M. Broadley 

432 Scraggy Neck Road 
Cataumet, MA 02534 

Tina M. Bronkhorst 

32 Rockwood St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Dawn M. Brough 

29 Center Apt. 3 
Dennisport, MA 02639 

Pamela C. Brown 

360 York St. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Steven G. Brown 

110 Bayberry Circle 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Theodore A. Brown 

P.O. Box 326 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Jon K. Bruckner 

106 Old Louisquisset 
Lincoln, RI 02865 

Michael C. Bruemmel 

48 Ridge Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Kenneth B. Brunetti 

120 Cleveland Street 
Wakefield, RI 02879 

Steven D. Brunstrom 

132 Child St. 

Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Kimberly A. Bryan 

212 Prince Ave. 
Marstons Mill, MA 02648 

Glenn R. Bryant 

200 Shane Dr. 
Chatham, MA 02633 

Leslie W. Buckland 

20 Riverview Drive 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Kathleen T. Budreski 

70 Heritage Way 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Pamela J. Bujnis 

17 Longmeadow Drive 
Canton, MA 02021 

Michael A. Bundas 

374 W. Elm Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Nancy A. Burgio 

514V2 E. Third St. 
S. Boston, MA 02127 

Brian W. Burke 

56 Hinston Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Henry P. Burke 

P.O. Box 118 
Eastham, MA 02642 

Marie E. Burke 

15 Batchelder Ave. 
Peabody, MA 01960 

John R. Burns III 

No Address Available 

Arthur J. Butters 

122 Standish Ave. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Kelly A. Byrne 



98 Maplewood Rd. 
Lynn, MA 01904 

Dorinda L. Byron 

137 Chestnut St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Daniel W. Cady 

7 Myrtle St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Karen A. Calabrese 

86 Tower St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Julie A. Caldarola 

77 Division St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Christopher E. Calos 

63 Thacher St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Timothy J. Campbell 

Skyline Trail 
Chester, MA 01011 

Tammy J. Canastra 

214 Mapie St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Marie J. Canavan 

8 Altair Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Kathleen Candeias 

3610 N. Main St. 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Paul M. Cangiano 

373 Fisher Street 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Mark Cannella 

6 Liberty Lane 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Gina M. Cannoles 

43 Riverdale Rd. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Anthony N. Caramando 

5085 Washington St. 
West Roxbury, MA 02132 

Andrea L. Carbone 

35 Digby Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Scott C. Carey 

1129 Court St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Sean M. Carey 

1185 South S. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Patricia J. Carifio 

479 West St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Patricia M. Carling 

39 Knox St. 
Palmer, MA 01069 

Anthony P. Carneiro 

188 West St. 
Milford, MA 01757 

Kathleen P. Carney 

6 Holly Gate Circle 
Middleton, MA 01949 

Melissa M. Caron 

60 Rockland St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Sandra L. Carraggi 

10 Maguire Ave. 
Avon, MA 02322 

Manuel M. Carvalho 

40 Meadow Ln. Apt. 10 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Carol E. Carver 

12 West St. 

Middleboro, MA 02346 

Kathleen F. Castagnozzi 

134 Bayberry Rd. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Donna J. Castelone 

12 Algonquin Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Deborah A. Cauley 

165 Carl Ave. Apt 42C 



Brockton, MA 02402 

Jill Cavallaro 

P.O. Box 2963 

30 Woodbine Con #3 

Fall River, MA 02720 

Kristin M. Cavanagh 

P.O. Box 1335 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

L. Eileen Cavanaugh 

18A Ocean View Ave. 
Mattapoisett, MA 02739 

Robert A. Cayer, Jr. 

323 Lowell Street 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Russell S. Cazeault 

1580 Main St. 
Osterville, MA 02655 

Robert C. Cecil 

84 Alma Rd. 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

Rebecca A. Cerutti 

215 Dailey Dr. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Gregory P. Cesarini 

232 Standish St. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Elena M. Ceurvels 

86 Maplewood Drive 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Keith E. Chagaris 

36 Allan Rd. 
Westwood, MA 02090 

Jacqueline M. Chagnot 

222 Baker St. 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Thomas M. Chamberlin 

177 3rd Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Elizabeth J. Chaney 

18 Pilgrim Rd. 

North Weymout, MA 02191 

Deborah R. Charland 

34 Cape Cod Drive 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Lisa J. Chiavaroli 

29 Elm Ave. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

April R. Chiero 

P.O. Box 203 
Teaticket, MA 02536 

Nicholas T. Chivers 

447 Main Street 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Jeannine M. Choquette 

122 Nyes Lane 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Kevin B. Chrisom 

20 Kevin Rd. 
Milton, MA 02186 



Beth Christensen 

31 Wyoming Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Donna M. Christopherson 

53 Russell St. 

N. Quincy, MA 02171 

Sandra L. Christoun 

100a Middleboro Rd. 
E. Freetown, MA 02717 

Matthew Ciaramella Jr. 

30 College Road 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Gina M. Ciccolo 

84 Copeland St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Sharon M. Cignetti 

22 Massachusetts Ave. 
Danvers, MA 01923 

Italia Cimino 

190 Summer St. 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Beth E. Clark 

21 Randall Rd. 
Reading, MA 01867 

Emily B. Clark 

2 Bradford Rd. 
Plympton, MA 02367 

Ellen J. Clarke 

42 Franklin Avenue 
Quincy, MA 02170 

Steven J. Clemente 

72 Calvin Avenue 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Lee S. Clerke 

464 King Street 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Lisa M. Clisbee 

17 Elderberry Dr. 
N. Easton, MA 02356 

Anne-marie Cloutier 

761 Cilley Rd. 
Manchester, NH 03103 

Catherine A. Cloutier 

134 Peckham Rd. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Daniel E. Coady 

86 Westview 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Jennifer A. Coates 

563 Weld St. 

West Roxbury, MA 02132 

Michael D. Cobb 

120 Elm St. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Kathleen A. Cockshaw 

466 Essex Street 
Weymouth, MA 02188 





V 




Antonio M. Coelho 

914 Plymouth Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Karyn E. Coffey 

34 Ames Court 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Jerome Coffman 

210 Hemlock St. 
Lakeville, MA 02347 

Debra J. Cogliano 

1 Brantwood Ln. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Susan E. Colacchio 

284 West Hill Road 
Marlboro, MA 01752 

David A. Colarusso 

42 Windsor Drive 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Catherine M. Cole 

58 Myrtle St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Cynthia E. Cole 

205 Blackthorne Rd. 
Marstons Mill, MA 02648 

Donna M. Colecchia 

33 Holmes St. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Caroline L. Collentro 

P.O. Box 1141 

N. Falmouth, MA 02556 

Michael A. Colter 

28 Talbot St. 
Saugus, MA 01906 

Claudine M. Colleran 

57 Fremont St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

John J. Collins 

84 Birch St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Maura C. Collopy 

'65 Ayer St. 
Methuen, MA 01844 

William T. Conard 

12 Sawyer Ave. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Christopher W. Condon 

175 Quincy Shore Dr. 
Quincy, MA 02171 

Kevin J. Condon 

89 Albemarle Rd. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Margaret M. Conian 

14 Magnolia Ave. 



Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Kristina F. Conley 

8 Shore Dr. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Mark E. Conlon 

199 Plymouth St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Stephen J. Connaughton 

12 Mcdonough Ct. 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Elizabeth A. Connelly 

70 Borden Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Paul F. Connelly 

42 Brewster Rd. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Michael G. Connolly 

42 Lonsdale St. 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Jeanne L. Conover 

23 Jaye Street 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Eric Conrad 

232 Evans St. 
Weymouth, MA 02191 

Anna Conte 

350 High St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Dennis R. Conway 

108 Russell St. 
Everett, MA 02149 

Sean E. Conway 

7 Brewster Rd. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Jennifer Coombs 

5 Edwards Ave. 
Wakefield, MA 01880 

Tracy L. Cooper 

432 Wilson Rd. 

Fall River, MA 02720 

Catherine J. Corkery 

14 Cuba St. 
Andover, MA 01810 

Jeffrey J. Cormier 

63 Belmont Ct. 9 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Angela L. Cornacchioli 

35 Pinehurst Ave. 
Auburn, MA 01501 

Daniel H. Correia 

228 Hillberg Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Judy S. Cosme 



70 Haffands St. 

Fall River, MA 02723 

Darlene F. Costa 

667 Brock Ave. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Mark A. Costa 

43 Sherbrooke Rd. 

N. Dartmouth, MA 02747 

James T. Costello 

59 Lonsdale St. 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Richard K. Costello 

292 Homeland Drive 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Kathleen J. Counter 

. 22 Harriss Ct. 
Abington, MA 02351 

Paul C. Cournoyer 

203 Hayden Rowe 
Hopkinton, MA 01748 

Frank D. Coutinho 

958 Center St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Richard A. Coveney 

206 Central St. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Donna L. Cram 

176 Moulton St. 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

Thomas A. Cremonini 

P.O. Box 271 
Sagamore, MA 02561 

Miguel J. Criado 

1111 Main Street 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Christine Crowley 

81 Chestnut St. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Michael L. Crowley 

151 Holden St. 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Thomas S. Crowley 

57 Belcher Dr. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Lisa A. Cruz 

685 Oak St. Bldg. 9 Apt. 7 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Patricia A. Cullen 

41 Walter St. 
Salem, MA 01970 

Paula A. Cullen 

1275 Ocean St. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Bruce B. Cumming 

Katama Rd. RFD 219 
Edgartown, MA 02539 

Karen A. Cummings 

16 Cedar Ter St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Frank Cunha 

745 Coggeshall St. 
New Bedford, MA 02746 

Marnie A. Cunniff 

784 County St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Daniel J. Cunningham 

37 Dartmouth Rd. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

David M. Curran 

20 Bonney Ln. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Deborah M. Curran 

22 Genevieve Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Michelle D. Curran 

107 Russet Rd. 

W. Roxbury, MA 02132 

Michelle A. Currie 

24 Thorn Ave. 

Buzzards Bay, MA 02532 

Carolyn M. Curry 

11 Englewood Rd. 



Winchester, MA 01890 

Dianne M. Curtin 

26 Linda St. 
Foxborough, MA 02035 

Gary G. Cyr 

600 Hill St. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Kelly A. Cyr 

3 Pheasant Hill Rd. 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Michelle C. Cyr 

34 Last St. 

Fall River, MA 02724 

Robert P. D'Amelio 

184 Russell Ln. 
Abington, MA 02351 

Elizabeth M. Daley 

126 Brattle St. 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Kathleen A. Daley 

3 Grove St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Paul J. Dalfonso 

204 N. Main St. 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Nonie F. Damon 

12 Merrill St. 
Newbury, MA 01950 

Kristin A. Damore 

285 Gifford St. 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

Paulette C. Dangelo 

8 Spencer Drive 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Christine C. Dares 

53 Himoor Cir. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Michelle A. Davey 

32 Marie Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Mary K. Davis 

39 W. Division St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Joanne M. Days 

Deer Path P.O. Box 998 
Truro, MA 02666 

Susan Patricia Deloughrey 

45 Day St. 

North Easton, 02356 

Amy E. Deabreu 

Box 74 Paradise Lane 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Sandra L. Deal 

5 Berwick Rd. 

S. Easton, MA 02375 

Margaret M. Deangelis 

46 Henshaw Drive 
Chatham, MA 02633 

Melissa A. Decosta 

22 Cottage St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

David Decoste 

R 1693 Meridian St. 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Scott D. Deeter 

21 Brandeis Cir. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Lisa M. Delande 

6 Hanson Rd. 
Danvers, MA 01923 

Christine Delaney 

1 Revere Drive 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Michael J. Delia Penna 

60 Prince St. 
Boston, MA 02113 

Jodi L. Deluty 

80 Warwick Rd. 

West Newton, MA 02165 

James M. Demaggio 

509 West Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 



Leah J. Demers 

59 S. Main St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Renee Demers 

412 Wareham St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Donna J. Dennen 

22 Scadding St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

John P. Derocha 

148 Keith Avenue Ext. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Linda P. Derro 

10 Stewart St. 

West Newbury, MA 01985 

Julie M. Deschenes 

28 Donnellan Cir. 
Weymouth, MA 02191 

Mark E. Deschenes 

1110 Dwelly St. 

Fall River, MA 02724 

Edmond N. Desciscio 

564 Center St. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Lourdes R. Deserpa 

315 Summer St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Diane Desousa 

21 Acushnet Ave. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Tammy A. Desrosiers 

9 Joan St. 

Pepperell, MA 01463 

David B. Devincentis 

253 Elm St. 

Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Elizabeth M. Devine 

64 Coweeset Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Shelley A. Devine 

34 Buzzards Bay Ave. 
Buzzards Bay, MA 02532 

Lisa M. Dewing 

168 West St. 
Weymouth, MA 02190 

Guy M. Dewolf 

144 Plymouth Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Diane S. DiGianvittorio 

136 Bittersweet Lane 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Philip J. Dias 

20 Highland Street 

So. Dartmouth, MA 02748 

Paula A. Dibenedetto 

96 Watson St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Barbara J. Dicorpo 

137 Bryant Street 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Lori A. Didonato 

45 Barnboard Lane 

West Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Alice P.Diener 

93 South St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Dinneen M. Diette 

183 Pine St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Janet Digirolamo 

7a Pocket Landing 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Paula J. Dillis 

86 Manners Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Diane M. Dimarco 

93 Bayrd St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Barbara J. Dimartino 

38 Haskell Rd. 
Pepperell, MA 01437 

Susan Dinocco 



322 



10 Norman Rd. 
Saugus, MA 01906 

Michael D. Dion 

291 High St. 

Fall River, MA 02720 

Stephen A. Dion 

869 Orchard St. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Karen M. Disciullo 

92 Tileston Street 
Everett, MA 02149 

Steven R. Ditria 

55 Case Dr. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Debra J. Dobbyn 

1366 Washington St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Elaine T. Doherty 

10 Maple Grove St. 
Melrose, MA 02176 

James C. Doherty 

P.O. Box 2035 

Ocean Bluff, MA 02065 

Maureen Doherty' 

10 Grant Avenue 
Walpole, MA 02032 

Maureen E. Doherty 

28 Blueberry Terrace 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Maureen P. Doherty 

43 Knollin St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Kerrianne S. Dolaher 

32 Biscayne Ave. 
Saugus, MA 01906 

John P. Dolan 

9 Cypress Ter. 

W. Roxbury, MA 02132 

James M. Domitrz 

18 Cypress St. 
Greenfield, MA 01301 

Beth A. Donahue 

353 Prospect St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Michael W. Donahue 

595 Plymouth St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Paula A. Donahue 

85 Old St. 

Randolph, MA 02368 

Michele A. Donnelly 

6 Carmine Ave. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Paul H. Donnelly 

6 Carmine Ave. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Janice M. Donovan 

167 Sherman St. 
Quincy, MA 02170 

Lorraine M. Donovan 

14 Guernsey St. 
Roslindale, MA 02131 

Sandra M. Donovan 

63 Whitmore St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Timothy M. Donovan 

12 Crestwood Cir. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Kathleen M. Doren 

259 Highland St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Theresa Dorsey 

19 Moulton St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Janette A. Doucette 

49 South Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Patricia A. Doucette 

17 Elliot Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Lois E. Doughty 

334 High Street 



Hanson, MA 02341 

Glenn E. Doulette 

95 Knollwood Cir. 
Holyoke, MA 01040 

Kathleen M. Doyle 

134 Curtis Ave. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Virginia L. Doyle 

21 Veronica Lane 

E. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Christine Dragon 

447 North Central St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Michael T. Draicchio 

146 Independence Ave. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Patrick W. Drew 

14 Martin Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Donna M. Driscoll 

88 Hillside Ave. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Jean Driscoll 

71 Vernon St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Kristine L. Drobot 

28 Green St. 
Dudley, MA 01570 

Daniel B. Dube 

256 Cedar Dr. P.O. Box 623 
Carver, MA 02330 

Donna L. Dubreuil 

188 Feno Ct. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Sharon A. Ducey 

244 South St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Judith A. Duffy 

46 Rickard St. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Maria E. Duganiero 

62 Kings Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Dorothy A. Duggan 

55 Short St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Miriam B. Dumas 

67 Seekonk St. 
Norfolk, MA 02056 

Ronald R. Dumont 

81 Burrill Avenue 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Susan L. Dumont 

310 Bakerville Road 

S. Dartmouth, MA 02748 

Elaine Dundon 

111 Crane St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Laurie A. Dunham 

1 1 Farragut Way 
Holden, MA 01520 

Linda L. Dunnam 

P.O. Box 4 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Barbara K. Duquette 

41 Overlook Dr. 
Centerville, MA 02632 

Dale A. Durfee 

71 Howard St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Linda A. Dutra 

54 Ipswich St. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Brian P. Dwyer 

576 Ea. 8th Street 
South Boston, MA 02127 

Hugh L. Dwyer 

1053 Tremont St. 

N. Dighton, MA 02764 

Kristin A. Eaton 

75 Stagecoach Rd. 
Duxbury, MA 02332 



Timothy J. Edwards 

14 Fairmont St. 
Chicopee, MA 01013 

Stephen G. Egan 

16 Appollo Road 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Thomas P. Egan 

7 Worthington Ave. 
Danvers, MA 01923 

William J. Egan 

16 Appollo Rd. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Heather A. Eggert 

44 Beaver Dam 
Natick, MA 01760 

Christine K. Elliott 

82 Eileen Street 
Yarmouthport, MA 02675 

Jean Elston 

800 Bearses Way Apt. 6ee 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

David T. Emmons 

115 Union St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Beth A. Empey 

739 Center St. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Mark D. England 

74 Vaughan St. 
Lakeville, MA 02346 

Mary B. Engstrom 

84 South St. Rm 25 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Christine Eppich 

32 Rock Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Andrea Erickson 

53 Lindsey Ln. 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Mary G. Fahy 

117 Edwin St. 
Quincy, MA 02171 

Dianne M. Fanning 

13 Hemlock Rd. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Kathaleen N. Fanning 

179 Oak Street 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Brian R. Farley 

P.O. Box 55 
Dalton, MA 01226 

Keith P. Farley 

20 Coolidge Rd. 
Ayer, MA 01432 

Leo F. Farrell, Jr. 

21 Harvest Ln. 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Elizabeth A. Farricy 

61 Alicia Rd. 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Maureen Faulkner-Skinner 

49 Pierce Avenue 
Lakeville, MA 02347 

Margherita L. Fay 

P.O. Box 45 
Easton, MA 02334 

Patricia A. Feeley 

43 Grassy Plain Rd. 
Riverside, RI 02915 

Sean T. Feeney 

10 Robin Hill Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 

Daniel J. Fellows 

72 Blackberry Ln. 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Susan E. Fennel! 

47 N. Bayfield Rd. 
Quincy, MA 02171 

Gerald J. Fenton 

17 Wilber Street 
Springfield, MA 01104 

Kimberly D. Ferance 



202 Plymouth St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Scott J. Ferbert 

1499 High St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

William P. Ferioli 

24 Colonial Post Dr. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Vincent J. Fernald 

40 Meadow Ln. 
Bridgewater, MA 
02324 

John P. Fernandes 

183 David St. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Eric E. Fernandez 

675 School St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Bruce D. Fernberg 

335 East Washington Street 
N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

Melissa M. Ferrari 

68 Spring Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Polly A. Field 

100 Neck Rd. 
Mattapoisett, MA 02739 

Kristyne Finlayson 

P.O. Box 87 
Brockton, MA 02403 

Cheryle A. Finn 

19 Nevada St. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Stacey L. Fiore 

34 Sewall St. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Mary E. Fisco 

50 Cato Ln. 
Nantucket, MA 02554 

Kerry J. Fitzgerald 

4 Tippy Cart Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Michelle Fitzsimmons 

119 Shaw St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Anne H. Flaherty 

291 Pitchers Way 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Christine L. Flaherty 

166 Southworth St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Karen I. Flaherty 

131 Billings Street 
No. Quincy, MA 02171 

Paula S. Flaherty 

115 Stonybrook Rd. 
Framingham, MA 01701 

Stephen A. Flemmi 

50 Marshall 



Braintree, MA 02184 

Donna M. Fleury 

P.O. Box 857 
Randolph, MA 02368 

David M. Floeck 

94 Thatcher St. 
E. Bridgewater, MA 
02333 

Gina M. Florio 

52 Charles St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 
02379 

Julie A. Flynn 

87 Valentine Street 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Kathleen L. Flynn 

470 Towne Street 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

Patricia M. Flynn 

15 Harlow St. 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Christopher H. Foglietta 

56 Orchard Street 
Lynn, MA 01905 

Carolyn Foley 

53 Court Road 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Karen Foley 

25 Foye Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Michelle M. Foley 

62 Woodsbury Road 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Susan C. Foley 

78 Lincoln Ave. 
Quincy, MA 02170 

Marianne Fontes 

62 Wayland Rd. 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Susan A. Forant 

151 Billings Street 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Ronald J. Ford 

44 Pine St. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Richard Fountaine, Jr. 

386 Plain St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Brian T. Fraga 

133 Tremont St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Dennis P. Frankio 

82 Upland Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Paula B. Fredriksen 

16 Columbus Ave. 
Beverly, MA 01915 





Brian M. Freeman 

340 Center St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Steven J. Freitas 

163 Washington St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Lynn A. Frias 

166 Clara St. 

New Bedford, MA 02744 

Kimberly A. Fuda 

62 Sagamore Rd. 

N. Weymouth, MA 02191 

Thomas C. Furcht 

RFD 3 Box 71 

Mt. Washington, MA 01258 

Lisa A. Furfaro 

306 N. Montello St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Lorraine K. Gabrielle 

41 Birch St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Marilyn L. Gadbois 

229 Pleasant St. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Kevin Gaffny 

20 Library St. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Matthew Gage 

49 Putnam St. 

E. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Jacqueline R. Gagnon 

1163 Old Fall River Road 
No. Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Scott R. Gagnon 

49 Van Buren 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Susan M. Gagnon 

484 Prospect HI St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Sharon I. Gailius 

130 South St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Paulajo Gaines 

227 Eustis Ave. 
Newport, RI 02840 

Daniel M. Gallagher 

512 Pleasant St. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Dennis L. Gallagher 

33 Clarence Ave. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Karen B. Gallerani 

83 Chapman Rd. 



Stoughton, MA 02072 

Diane M. Gallo 

193 River Rd. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Laurie J. Galvin 

54 Wedgewood St. 
North Quincy, MA 02171 

Tammy J. Gampel 

49 Phillips Drive 
Newburyport, MA 01950 

Andrew P. Ganley, Jr. 

105 Pleasant St. 
Plympton, MA 02367 

Patricia C. Gannon 

44 Bradley Rd. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Robert T. Gardner 

37 Birchwood Rd. 
Holliston, MA 01746 

Amy K. Garland 

37 W. Chestnut St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Dana M. Garlick 

6 Powderhorn Way 
Sandwich, MA 02563 

Todd B. Garrison 

26 Green St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Christine M. Gates 

43 King Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Anne Marie Generazzo 

414 N. Main St. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Scott A. Gentile 

7 Mystic Ave. 
Gloucester, MA 01930 

Thomas George 

93 Oak Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Nicholas M. Gerrior 

152 Plympton St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Elfrieda M. Gershman 

93 Plymouth St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Andrew Gibson 

11 Garfield Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Bryan E. Giddings 

37 Harrison Avenue 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Pamela A. Giles 



5 Walnut St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Christopher E. Gill 

203 Bishop St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Geoffrey T. Gill 

25 Chipman Rd. 
Sandwich, MA 02563 

Cheryl A. Gillan 

23 Clapp Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Linda L. Gillan 

23 Clapp Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Kristine L. Gillespie 

27 Blakely Cir. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Andrew P. Gillis 

302 Prospect St. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

David A. Gillis 

21 Bloomfield St. 
Dorchester, MA 02124 

Matthew J. Gillis 

302 Prospect St. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

John M. Gilson 

422 E. Wakefield Blvd. 
Winsted, CT 06098 

Lisa A. Giniewicz 

36 Ellis Ave. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Sean T. Ginley 

46 Cross St. 
Topsfield, MA 01983 

Janet E. Giorgetti 

62 North River Road 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Dorothy L. Girten 

P.O. Box 218 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Brenda E. Glover 

28 Ann Lane 

N. Kingstown, RI 02852 

Sarah M. Glover 

11 Hampshire Ave. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

William C. Glover 

34 Morningside Path 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Michele T. Glynn 

8 Town Line Rd. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Charles H. Goddard 

P.O. Box 367 
Minot, MA 02055 

Jeffrey T. Godin 

6 Juniper Rd. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Michael G. Goldstein 

51 Taft Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Fredric M. Golembewski 

86 High Street 

N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

Melvin J. Gonsalves 

193 Brick Kiln Rd. 

E. Falmouth, MA 02536 

Michelle Gonsalves 

177 Dogwood St. 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Brady Goodell 

288 N. Main Street 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Amanda J. Goodwin 

7 Park Lane 
Norton, MA 02766 

Ellen M. Goodwin 

134 Scott Cir. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Steven R. Goodyear 

15 Vautrinot Pob 967 



Hull, MA 02045 

Earlene M. Gordon 

P.O. Box 829 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Cheryl Gorgone 

12 Milo Street 

W. Newton, MA 02316 

Maryellen Gorham 

211 KSt. 

S. Boston, MA 02127 

Bonnie S. Gorman 

40 Allen St. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Pamela A. Gorman 

20 Cameo Rd. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Beth A. Gould 

84 S. Meadow Rd. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Eileen M. Gould 

35 Amvet Blvd. 

N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

David T. Goulder 

47 Avery St. 

N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

Bethany J. Goulet 

12 Brewster St. 

South Dartmouth, MA 02748 

Joannekirst Grace 

8b Dionne St. 
Westport, MA 02790 

Patricia A. Grace 

P.O. Box 1324 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Paul A. Grace 

7 Jarvis Ave. 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Paul J. Graceffa 

12 Conestoga Rd. 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Catherine F. Grady 

237 St. Nicholas Ave. 
Worcester, MA 01606 

Peggy A. Grady 

910 Hood St. 

Fall River, MA 02720 

Bernard P. Graham 

495 Washington St. #1 
Abington, MA 02351 

Carmela Grasso 

21 Wadaga Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02191 

Jeffrey R. Graveline 

12 Fletcher St. 
Plainville, MA 02762 

Lisa Dawne Gray-Jackson 

P.O. Box 883 
Cambridge, MA 02238 

Gina L. Graziano 

149 Center Street 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Jeffrey F. Greelish 

Box 509 Durgin Bsc. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Bonnie L. Greenberg 

168 Wilshire Dr. 
Sharon, MA 02064 

Deirdre R. Greene 

15 Monique Dr. 
Westport, MA 02790 

William T. Greene 

98 Breer Cir. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Katherine M. Gregory 

16 Pacheco Path P.O. Box 123-t 
E. Falmouth, MA 02536 

Suzanne M. Grenier 

771 Plymouth St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Jeffrey L. Grever 

937 Main St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 



Matthew F. Griffin, III 

101 Williams St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Kristin M. Gronberg 

94 East St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Glen A. Gronroos 

1 Cottage Ct. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Ulysses Gausch 

5 Albany St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Michelle L. Guerette 

45 Hood St. Apt. 103 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Cathy M. Guerriero 

14 Meetinghouse Ln. 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Dawn-Marie Guevremont 

45 Grove St. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Diane C. Haase 

73 Commonwealth Ave. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Kathleen A. Habart 

1159 West St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

George E. Haddad 

124 Myrtle St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Craig C. Hall 

438 Pleasant St. 
Weymouth, MA 02190 

Brendan W. Hallisey 

17 Lucy Ln. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Vincent T. Hallisey 

17 Lucy Ln. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Joanna C. Hand 

637 S. Franklin St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Kristen L. Handricken 

108 Union St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

William A. Hanlon 

15 Park Ave. Apt. 13 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Christine A. Harhen 

105 Whitman St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Donna Jean Harman 

45 Maple Avenue 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Arnold Harper 

32 Priscille St. 
Falmouth, MA 02536 

Catherine M. Harrington 

2 Haystack Ln. 
Sandwich, MA 02563 

James P. Harrington 

165 New Hampshire Ave. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Timothy P. Harrington 

59 South St. 
Easton, MA 02334 

Ronald K. Harris 

P.O. Box 917 
Brockton, MA 02403 

Stephen E. Harrison 

78 Squanto Rd. 

N. Weymouth, MA 02191 

Peter E. Hart 

155 Conant St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Christine M. Hartman 

66 Gary Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Rae R. Harvey 

57 Belmont Ct. Apt. 9 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Wendy A. Haskell 



324 



33 Parker St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Amy Hayes 

759 E. Broadway 

South Boston, MA 02127 

Bryon K. Hayes 

Box 186 Nauset Rd. 
North Eastham, MA 02651 

Jocye C. Hayes 

58 N. Leyden St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Kristin A. Healy 

11 Porter St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Carolyn M. Hearn 

25 Fair Oaks Pk. 
Needham, MA 02192 

Jeanne E. Heaton 

290 Ware St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Mary E. Hendricks 

745 Ledge Rd. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

James T. Hennemann 

81 Burrill Ave. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Tina L. Hennigan 

75 Jefferson Ave. 

West Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Kenneth Hentschel 

9 West St. 

Kingston, MA 02364 

Tong Her 

62 Tremont St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Ya Her 

P.O. Box 3243 
Brockton, MA 02403 

Jeffrey W. Hewett 

27 Quarry Rd. 
Randolph, MA 02343 

Susan J. Hibbett 

9 Caitlyn Circle 
Marstons Mill, MA 02648 

Tammy M. Hickey 

P.O. Box 375 
Conway, NH 03818 

Joanne Higgins 

46 Braeburn Rd. 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Nanci Hilditch 

P.O. Box 206 
Hopkinton, MA 01748 

Catherine E. Hill 

63 Concord Street 
Holliston, MA 01746 

Kelly Ann Hoar 

7 Carmel Dr. 
Billerica, MA 01862 

Alan Hobb 

65 Rockefeller St. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Lynn M. Hobin 

4 Sushala Way 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Michael J. Hocking 

47 Concord Street 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Robert F. Hoefer 

12 Vincent Rd. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Brian D. Hogan 

29 W. Meadow Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Deborah L. Holland 

P.O. Box 482 

445 West Center St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

James B. Hollister 

44 Davis Ave. 
Brookline, MA 02146 

Pamela J. Holm 



9 Newman Dr. 
Rutland, MA 01543 

Moira Ann Holmes 

24 Longwood Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Thomas Holmes, Jr. 

19 Devine Rd. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Traci E. Holmes 

143 Hortonville Rd. 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Cynthia M. Holt 

29 Rock St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Charles H. Homer 

611 Pond Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02383 

Ruth E. Hooker 

139 Whitman St. 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Ericka M. Hoss 

6 Paddington Way 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Priscilla Hotz 

136 North Spencer Road 
Spencer, MA 01562 

Michele M. Houdlette 

104 Mayflower Ridge 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Kerry A. Hovey 

18921 Capense St. 
Fountain Vail, CA 92708 

Christine Howard 

32 Whiting St. 
Plymouth, 02360 

Christine Hubert 

370 Valley Road 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Christopher A. Hudson 

157 Lane Drive 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Patricia G. Huebner 

100 Keene St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Christine L. Huggins 

39 Squirrel Run 
Yarmouthport, MA 02675 

Donna M. Hughes 

88 Regent Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Charles R. Hunter 

4 Gault Rd. 

W. Wareham, MA 02576 

Linda J. Hurder 

30 Payson Ln. 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

Daniel J. Hurley 

44 Butler Rd. 

E. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Philip J. Iacobacci 

510 Summer St. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Jere L. Ingargiola 

184 Perkins Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Christine Ingemi 

34 Turner Rd. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Michael J. Ingersoll 

39 4th St. 

Norwood, MA 02062 

Daryl M. Isles 

481 Lovell St. 
Peabody, MA 01960 

Matthew L. Jackson 

725 Washington St. #8 
S. Easton, MA 02375 

Susan E. Jakub 

23 Friend St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Peter D. James 

279 Willis Rd. 



Sudbury, MA 01776 

Walter H. Jameson 

147 Stanton St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Matthew E. Jardin 

230 Bay Rd. 

North Easton, MA 02356 

Sherie M. Johansen 

24 Aldea Avenue 
Dudley, MA 01570 

Alan J. Johnson 

31 Meadow Ln. 8 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Angela Y. Johnson 

48 New Whitney St. 
Boston, MA 02115 

Kenneth L. Johnson, Jr. 

112 Lynn Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Lisa M. Johnson 

147 Hayward Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Nanci J. Johnson 

84 Quincy St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Patricia A. Johnson 

329 Lakewood Dr. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Wendy K. Johnson 

15 Sahlin Cir. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Carrie L. Jokinen 

P.O. Box 121 

N. Scituate, MA 02060 

Pamela M. Jordan 

34 Berkeley St. 
Somerville, MA 02143 

Christopher L. Joseph 

147 North Pearl St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Scott G. Joseph 

156 Windswept Rd. 

W. Wareham, MA 02576 

Christopher J. Joyce 

10 Alexander Rd. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Christine M. Kane 

6 Old Stone Way #6 

E. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Jan Marie Kane 

8 Worcester Drive 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Anastasis Kapothanasis 

60 Mott St. 

New Bedford, MA 02700 

Paula A. Karalekas 

8 Anthony Ter. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Efthimios Karanikola 

299 Pleasant St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Catherine C. Karl 

355 Neptune St. 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Ivo Karmely 

20 Muriel Rd. 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

Messlech Kassaye 

65 Ellen Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

David A. Kaunelis 

489 Turnpike St. Unit 2-3 
South Easton, MA 02375 

Joan M. Keane 

168 Babcock St. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Patricia M. Kearnan 

20 Hazel St. 
Uxbridge, MA 01569 

Joan G. Kearney 

23 Piedmont St. 
Quincy, MA 02170 



Gregory A. Kearsley 

24 Stuart St. 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Jessica I. Keay 

294 Main Street 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Kerrilee Keith 

55 Stonegate Ln. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Corinne L. Kelleher 

75 Janebar Circle 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Maryellen Kelleher 

90 Trefton Dr. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Tia M. Kelleher 

40 Johnson St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Felicia A. Kelley 

15 Morgan Rd. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Janet E. Kelley 

212 Monroe St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

John F. Kelley 

76 Main St. Pob 404 
Norfolk, MA 02056 

Karen L. Kelley 

67 Tryan Ave. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Kathleen M. Kelley 

34 Browning Street 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Kathleen P. Kelley 

128 Winnifred Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Thomas F. Kelley, Jr. 

73 Davis Road 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Brendan C. Kelliher 

56 Eastern Ave. 
Lynn, MA 01902 

Joanne Kelly 

11 Sunrise Rd. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Stephen J. Kelly 

53 Tyler St. 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

Michelle J. Kelty 

91 Broad St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Debra J. Kenney 

39 Abels Way 
Marion, MA 02738 

Michael W. Kenney 

135 Glen Meadow Rd. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Elizabeth Kenyon 

1117 Washington St. 



Canton, MA 02021 

Steven M. Kerman 

170 Charles Cir. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Dana E. Khouri 

223 Robert Rd. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Tracey A. Kielty 

12 Pridemark Ln. 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

James M. Kieran 

295 Mayfair Rd. 
Yarmouthport, MA 02675 

Deborah L. King 

146 Plymouth Street 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Suzanne L. Kinman 

75 Damon Rd. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Mary K. Kinsella 

1 Edgehill Rd. 
Milton, MA 
02186 

Lail L. Kinsey 

830 Maguire Rd. 
Kennebunk, ME 04043 

Jeffrey M. Kinsherf 

73 Jerome St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Sandra D. Kleiner 

19 Parker Dr. 

East Freetown, MA 02717 

Edward M. Klimas 

12 Stratford Ave. 
Avon, MA 02322 

Patricia A. Kloster 

662 Warren Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Claire E. Knowles 

P.O. Box 292 

South Orleans, MA 02662 

Lance R. Kolb 

15 Summit Ave. 
Tappan, NY 10983 

Krysta M. Koppenal 

630 Farm Rd. 
Marlboro, MA 01752 

Alan D. Kowalski 

82 Cape Cod Ln. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Scott A. Kramer 

50 Traders Ln. 

W. Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Tobi E. Krasnow 

82 French St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

David M. Kraunelis 





28 Hampstead Street 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Michael T. Kripke 

685 Oak St. Bldg. 9 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Susan C. Krippendorf 

11 Mapledale PI. 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

Steven M. Kriteman 

16 Annette Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Tami L. Krueger 

37 Liverpool Dr. 
Yarmouthport, MA 02675 

Meredith L. Kruse 

9 Maple Circle 
Westboro, MA 01581 

David M. Kruskall 

29 Gaslight Lane 

North Easton, MA 02356 

Robert Krystofolski 

106 County Rd. 

West Wareham, MA 02576 

Peter A. Kuhn 

P.O. Box 156 

White Horse B, MA 02381 

Timothy S. Kurtz 

244 Cambell Ct. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Gerald J. LaCasse 

P.O. Box 4032 
Brockton, MA 02403 

Dawn C. Labounty 

34 Foch Avenue 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Susan A. Lacamera 

32 Old Powder Hse Rd. 
Lakeville, MA 02347 

Ailsa Lacoste 

1691 Commercial St. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02189 

Patricia A. Ladas 

198 Edgewater Drive 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Mary V. Lafond 

68 Nye Road 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

Elizabeth J. Lagasse 

2675 Riverside Ave. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Abdul-hamid Lakkis 

101 Austin St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 




Kathleen M. Lally 

6 Cananaough Rd. 
Braintree, MA 02467 

Antoinette Lambiase 

P.O. Box 130 109 East St. 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Curtis J. Landsberger 

276 Plymouth Ave. 

E. Wareham, MA 02538 

Alice M. Lang 

180 Main St. #b44 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Joseph J. Lange 

7 Oldwood Rd. 
Wilbraham, MA 01095 

Denise M. Lank 

92 Wenham St. 

Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

Marialaina A. Lannin 

9 Sandy Ln. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Kellie A. Lantz 

94 Crane Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Christina A. Lapierre 

40 George Rd. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Claire M. Lapointe 

196 E. Main St. 
Avon, MA 02322 

Teresa A. Larosa 

95 Common St. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Joyce A. Lattin 

42 Lantz Ave. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Pamela J. Laubenstein 

5 Myopia Rd. 

Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Edward Lauria 

174 Ash St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Normand Laurianno 

129 Stevens Street Apt. 1 
Fall River, MA 02721 

Ann F. Lauzon 

Box 1087 

Duxbury, MA 02331 

Emily L. Lavalley 

49 Elmwood St. 

N. Attleboro, MA 02760 

Julie A. Lavigne 

20 Smith's Ln. 



Kingston, MA 02364 

Linda T. Lawton 

203 Milton St. 
Wollaston, MA 02170 

Kevin M. Leahy 

139 Howland Rd. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Christopher J. Leblanc 

220 Moncrief Rd. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Ramona R. Leclair 

890 Main St. 
Agawam, MA 01001 

William H. Lecuyer 

108 Maple Ave. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Brian D. Lee 

103 Centre St. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Christopher R. Lee 

14 Warren Ave. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Michael A. Legere 

308 Somerset Ave. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Herbert J. Lemon 

1004 High St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Margaret M. Lenehan 

19 Cherry St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Darren L. Lennon 

51 Lynde St. 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Douglas A. Lent 

Park St. Apt. 3 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Laurie-Anne Lepage 

70 Progressive Ave. 

West Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Elisa M. Leston 

576 Elm St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Crispin S. Leverone 

357 Liberty St. 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Susan Levine 

26 Burt Street 
Norton, MA 02766 

Regina T. Lewis 

100 George Street 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Karen L. Lieb 

23 Rocky Gutter St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Barbara A. Lima 

26 Greenbrier Ct. 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Robert B. Lima 

27 Saucier Street 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Susan L. Limone 

266 Main St. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Arthur F. Lincoln 

11 Westland St. 
Worcester, MA 01602 

Diane M. Lind 

96 Bruce Rd. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Kristin L. Lindquist 

134 Old Pine Drive 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Maurine A. Lindquist 

134 Old Pine Drive 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Debra A. Linton 

43 Rutland Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Matthew P. Lizotte 

110 Seekell St. 

E. Taunton, MA 02718 



Nils O. Ljungberg 

7 Skyline Drive 
Rutland, MA 01543 

Donna Lloyd 

42 Amherst Road 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Monica A. Logue 

8 Sky view Rd. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Anthony V. Lombre 

20 Thirteenth Avenue 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Kenneth W. Long 

5 Lantern Ln. 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Susan Lopes 

70 Locust St. 
Berkley, MA 02780 

Stephanie J. Loranger 

3 Gray Oaks Dr. 

E. Freetown, MA 02717 

Janet M. Lord 

3 Ashby Rd. 
Bedford, MA 01730 

Laura M. Loring 

260 Cross St. 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Linda B. Loto 

33 Center St. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Douglas A. Lowe 

85 Summer Street 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Jacqueline L. Lowell 

194 Salt Rock Rd. 
Barnstable, MA 02630 

Suzanne C. Lowell 

Popes Point Rd. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Robert W. Low man 

182 Pitchers Way 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Gary A. Lucier 

147 Forest Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Lisa J. Ludwig 

84 Main St. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Suzanne L. Luinis 

52 Brookfield Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Lynn M. Lumsden 

8 Croydon Rd. 
Framingham, MA 01701 

Amy E. Lydon 

7 Orchard St. 
Quincy, MA 02171 

Mary Ellen Lynch 

57 Nicholas Road 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Jennifer M. Lyons 

235 Snow Owl Dr. 
Southington, CT 06489 

Jean M. MacCormick 

132 Whidden Ave. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Maureen A. MacCurtain 

23 Roberts Rd. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Ann M. MacDonald 

42 Dana St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Deborah L. MacDonald 

451 Liberty St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Jane G. Macintosh 

37 Lincoln Ave. 

W. Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Lisa A. MacKay 

62 Chestnut St. 
Andover, MA 01810 

Kathleen J. MacLean 



118 Warren Avenue 
Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Jane A. MacLeod 

15 Bloomfield St. 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

William A. MacLeod 

P.O. Box 547 

West Springfield, MA 01090 

Charlene D. Machnik 

P.O. Box 603 Mill St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Claudia C. Maciel 

45 Norfolk Rd. 
Cohasset, MA 02025 

Kathleen M. Mackiewicz 

23 Fairview St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Thomas L. Magee 

82 Lawrence St. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Maureen P. Magennis 

61 Chute Rd. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Lauren K. Mahan 

170 Arlington Street 
Wollaston, MA 02170 

Melissa W. Maher 

P.O. Box 1667 
244 Washington St. 
Duxbury, MA 02331 

Rita M. Maher 

442 Plain Street 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Dana C. Mahoney 

38 Sanderson Ave. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Susan J. Mahoney 

39 George St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Valerie A. Mailloux 

06 Seaview Rd. Box 89 
Sagamore Beach, MA 02562 

Nancy A. Malcolm 

65 Wareham St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Kathy J. Malkasian 

8 Sigourney St. 
Oxford, MA 01540 

Lynn A. Malkasian 

8 Sigourney St. 
Oxford, MA 01540 

Melanie A. Maloney 

161 Central Ave. 
Needham, MA 02194 

Christine N. Manley 

150 Lakeshore Dr. 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Cynthia A. Manning 

8 Thayer Hts. Rd. 
Hopkinton, MA 01748 

Kevin E. Manning 

7 Bradford Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Susan J. Marble 

132 South Ave. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Dina M. Marchetti 

53 Applejack Ln. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Roxanne V. Marco 

190 Clare Ave. 

Hyde Park, MA 02136 

Charlotte R. Marean 

25 Locust St. 
Medford, MA 02155 

William T. Marinelli 

6 Vera St. 

Dorchester, MA 02124 

Jeannette Marmen 

101 Parker St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Peter P. Maroon 



326 



932 Riverside Dr. 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Jill A. Marsden 

1158 Burt St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Deborah A. Marshall 

217 Deane Street 

New Bedford, MA 02746 

Mary E. Marshall 

5736 Johnson Street 
Otis Angb, MA 02542 

Laura A. Martin 

42 Donald Rd. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Nicole Martin 

P.O. Box 3631 

Fall River, MA 02722 

Sherry A. Martin 

II Park Rd. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Sheryl A. Martin 

179 Summer Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Joanne Martins 

76 Hunter St. 

Fall River, MA 02721 

David A. Mason 

50 Southland Ter. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Linda S. Mason 

5 Duncan Drive 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Michael J. Mason 

31 Winslow Rd. 
West wood, MA 02090 

Theresa R. Mason 

84 Brookfield Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Danielle L. Mastro 

82 Strawberry Ln. 
Duxbury, MA -02332 

Clorinda A. Mastromarino 

14 Danforth Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Lynn M. Mathias 

62 Tee Jay Dr. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

David S. Matloff 

6 Barbara Road 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Jean F. Mattila 

520 Franklin St. 
Wrentham, MA 02093 

Christine M. Mattos 

5 Arch Street 
Abington, MA 02351 

Christopher P. Mazeika 

153 Boylston St. 
Shrewsbury, MA 01545 

Victoria A. Mazza 

77 Tudor St. 
Chelsea, MA 02150 

Donna M. Mbuthi 

P.O. Box 804 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Linda A. McAllister 

2000 Bay St. Apt. 191k 
Fall River, MA 02724 

Janet M. McAndrew 

148 Varao Avenue 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Barbara A. McCabe 

III Surrey St. 
Medford, MA 02155 

Kathleen A. McCarthy 

47 Greensboro Rd. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Robin G. McCarthy 

3 Alden Rd. 
Beverly, MA 01915 

Teresa A. McCarthy 

1069 W. Elm St. Ext. 



Brockton, MA 02401 

Victoria L. McCarthy 

1 Burrill Ter. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Mary H. McCoole 

102 East Water St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Brian T. McCormack 

9 Lotus Path 
Natick, MA 01760 

Joan T. McCormack 

886 Judson St. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Richard W. McCormack 

214 Pine St. 
Holbrook, MA 02343 

Michael P. McCoy 

665 Hill St. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Corinthia V. McCray 

79 Waldo St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Debra A. McCrensky 

3 Meadow Ln. Apt. 8 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Leonard A. McCue, IV 

23 Lantern Ln. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Kristin A. McCuin 

118 Hacketts Pond Dr. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Michael J. McCutcheon 

15 Hillcrest Dr. 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Michelle McDermott 

9 Leroy Street 
Attleboro, MA 02703 

Charles J. McDonald 

P.O. Box 43 
Chartley, MA 02712 

John J. McDonough 

190 Bolas Rd. 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Kathleen A. McEachern 

58 Shore Avenue Apt. 1 
Falmouth, MA 02540 

William P. McEntee 

54 Winnifred Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Andrew P. McGarrett 

4 Belcher St. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Winifred J. McGarry 

12 Woodale Avenue 
W. Swanzey, NH 03469 

David M. McGlynn 

33 Williams St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Ian D. McGonnigal 

81 Tecumseh Dr. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Kathleen J. McGough 

15 Harcourt 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Deborah J. McGowan 

4 Staiti Cir. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Helen M. McGuire-Scott 

503 Grove Street 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Renee Mclnnes 

P.O. Box 1342 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Mary A. Mcintosh 

180 Ellisville Drive 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Patricia A. McKenna 

62 Hodges Ave. 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

Diane McLaughlin 

97 French Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 



Jean A. McLaughlin 

65 Ryder Rd. 

N. Harwich, MA 02645 

Jennifer M. McLaughlin 

30 Burroughs Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

John L. McLean 

33 Ithica 

Brockton, MA 02402 

Andrew McLellan 

81 Great Republic Ave. 
Weymouth, MA 02190 

Gillian A. McManus 

16 Sanger Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Rheta A. McNamara 

2140 State Rd. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Donald C. McNeil, Jr. 

36 Hudson Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Paula J. McNeil 

16 Hillington Dr. 

N. Easton, MA 02356 

James P. McPhee 

106 W. Lake Dr. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Ana M. Medeiros 

131 Winston St. 
Acushnet, MA 02745 

Anne M. Medeiros 

11 Harrison Ave. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Joanne M. Medeiros 

43 Foster Street Apt. IE 
New Bedford, MA 02740 

Marcia A. Medeiros 

78 Linden St. 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Maria F. Medeiros 

446 Ray Street 

Fall River, MA 02720 

Sheila A. Medeiros 

216 Warren Street 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Michael J. Meers 

4 Connecticut Ave. 
Blackstone, MA 01504 

Walter D. Mehl, Jr. 

131 Portland St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Karen Melanson 

Box 7279 Pope Hall 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Kathleen A. Melanson 

32 Mamie Rd. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Cynthia L. Mello 

185 London St. 

Fall River, MA 02723 

Jennifer B. Mello 

469 Queen Anne Rd. 
Harwich, MA 02645 

Barry J. Mernin 

2 Walnut Ct. 
Woburn, MA 01801 

Wendy J. Merrikin 

43 Rutland St. Apt. 1 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Arthur G. Messenger, III 

224 Nelson Rd. 
Scarsdale, NY 10583 

Lisa A. Messina 

4 Willow Street 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Michael J. Messina 

22 Barbara Ln. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Paula S. Metrano 

145 Burt St. #2 
Norton, MA 02766 

Douglas E. Michaud 



915 Stratford Ln. 
Warwick, Rl 02886 

Allison H. Miller 

27 Chessman Dr. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Barbara J. Miller 

48 Carroll Drive 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Mark J. Miller 

25 Rahway Rd. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Claudia L. Mills 

5 Torrington Road 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Karen A. Mills 

441 Beale St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Melissa J. Mills 

20 Blanding Rd. 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

Ann L. Milroy 

21 Vinton Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Regina A. Miniacci 

3 Shepard Street 
Fall River, MA 02724 

Mandy J. Miserandino 

770 South River St. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

William J. Mitchell 
16 Adams Dr. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Karen L. Modano 

5 Huron Dr. 
Hudson, MA 01749 

Stephen M. Mohan 

100 Nerdham St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Melinda H. Moleon 

49 Longmeadow Rd. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Kelly A. Monahan 

14 Lobao Dr. 
Danvers, MA 01923 

Darla J. Mondou 

11 Glen Ave. P.O. Box 204 
Upton, MA 01568 

Joseph V. Montagna 

745 Washington Street 
S. Easton, MA 02375 

Gilda Montrond 

1 1 Caserico Court 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Tracie A. Mooney 

60 Cynthia Rd. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Linda J. Moore 

85 June Street 
Marshfield, MA 02050 



Susan J. Moore 

807 N. Montello St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Teriellen Moore 

6 Friend Street 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Lori L. Morales 

114 Warren St. 

West Springfield, MA 01089 

Kathleen M. Moran 

99 Pearl Street 

N. Weymouth, MA 02191 

Michelle C. Morey 

P.O. Box 123 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Timothy C. Mori 

41 Winter St. 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Jean M. Moriarty 

308 Forest St. 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Carol M. Moro 

10 Wind Chime Dr. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Ann R. Morrill 

103 Hart St. Bldg. 3 Apt. 306 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Nancy J. Morrison 

424 Forest St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

David J. Morrissey 

24 Chapel St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Marybeth Morrissey 

127 Levin Rd. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Allison J. Morse 

Pleasant Valley Rd. 
Amesbury, MA 01913 

Jonathan Morse 

C/O Rentacruise Inc. 
Warren, RI 02885 

Melissa A. Morse 

840 R Middle Rd. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Sally E. Morse 

54 Mountain Ave. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

David A. Mosher 

16 Water St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Sheryl A. Moss 

66 Ferris Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Ronald J. Motta 

47 Windsor Rd. 
Norwood, MA 02062 




327 




Theresa Moura 

26 Clifford St. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Michelle A. Mo watt 

38 Seaver St. 

North Easton, MA 02356 

Dennis P. Moynihan 

203 Zcno Crocker Road 
Centerville, MA 02132 

Douglas J. Muise 

410 Center St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Mary-alice C. Muise 

19 Michele Ln. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Maurice P. Mulcahy 

44 Marmion St. 
Jamaica Plain, MA 02130 

Steven P. Muldoon 

212 Middleboro Ave. 
E. Taunton, MA 02718 

Linda A. Munise 

29 Sabbatia Drive 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Jeannine Munsey 

67 Fairmont St. 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Dianne E. Munson 

43c Memorial Dr. 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Christine L. Murphy 

251 Candlewood Ln. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Lisa J. Murphy 

129 Russell Rd. 

West Newton, MA 02165 

Matthew Murphy 

Box 62 1W 
Waquoit, MA 02536 

Scott W. Murphy 

22 Willow St. 
Reading, MA 01867 

Joanne M. Murray 

60 Oakdale Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Scott F. Murray 

698 Prospect St. 
Dighton, MA 02764 

Douglas J. Musto 

45 Cypress Street 
Medfield, MA 02052 

Leah A. Musto 

484 Williams St. 



Mansfield, MA 02048 

Richard T. Nahas 

43 Elm Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Megurni Naito 

153 Spring St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

John A. Nardullo 

23r Purchase St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Karen E. Nash 

2 Rimic Way 
Rehoboth, MA 02769 

Alan D. Nasuti 

89 Pond St. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Karen R. Natale 

136 Downing St. 
Fall River, MA 02723 

Leah M. Negrucci 

35 Hayes Ave. 

Feeding Hills, MA 01030 

Christine M. Neil 

35 Cumberland Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Mary I. Nelson 

40 Mockingbird Ln. 

W. Yarmouth, MA 02673 

Jorge L. Neves 

124 Beech St. 
Holyoke, MA 01040 

Kimberly W. Newcomb 

102 Arlington St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

James H. Newton, Jr. 

75 Regan Rd. 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Deborah M. Nichols 

117 S. Main St. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Cheryl D. Nickerson 

216 Birch St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Annmarie Noenickx 

226 Sea St. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Christine A. Nolan 

49 Meadow Lane Apt. 5 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Linda R. Nordin 

90 Blodgett Ave. 
Swampscott, MA 01907 

Suzanne E. Norris 



166 E. Main St. 
Norton, MA 02766 

Kerry A. Norton 

5 Glad St. 
Assonet, MA 02702 

Patricia F. Norton 

73 Beach St. 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

Patrick J. Norton 

25 Heather Dr. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Stephen D. Norton 

63 Charlemont St. 
Boston, MA 02122 

Timothy P. Norton 

144 Pine St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Lizo Ntshengulana 

77 South Street 
Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Amy B. O'Brien 

134 High St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Steven E. O'Brien 

27 Elm St. 

Plymouth, MA 02360 

Terri L. O'Brien 

100 Summer Street 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Virginia M. O'Brien 

34 Walnut Street 
Reading, MA 01867 

Robert K. O'Connell 

41 Wood St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Kathleen A. O'Connor 

11 Carlisle Street 
Andover, MA 01810 

Megan M. O'Connor 

7 Nipmuc Rd. 
Paxton, MA 01612 

Maureen A. O'Donnell 

26 Eaton St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Robert L. O'Donnell 

170 Mechanic Street 
Foxboro, MA 02035 

William C. O'Donnell 

19 Charlotte Rd. 

E. Walpole, MA 02032 

Christopher M. O'Halloran 

17 School St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Kerry A. O'Keefe 

16 Oliver Street 
Tewksbury, MA 01876 

Arthur J. O'Leary, Jr. 

22 Pin Oak Drive 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Barbara J. O'Neil 

25 Massachusetts Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Kathlene M. O'Neil 

4 Brook Drive 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Patrick M. O'Neil 

14 James Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02189 

Kathleen M. O'Rourke 

123 Oakland Ave. 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Maryellen O'Rourke 

18 North Street 

Newton Centre, MA 02159 

Leigh C. Oberton 

35 Hobart St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Christopher L. Oliveira 

12 Cottage Ct. 
Middleboro, MA 02346 

Paul K. Olson 

51 Driftwood Ln. 



S. Yarmouth, MA 02664 

Lori A. Oman 

78 Studley Rd. 

S. Yarmouth, MA 02664 

Lisa A. Orlandello 

22 Folsom St. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Miguel A. Ortega 

Box 1224 

Brockton, MA 02403 

Sherri J. Ouellette 

9 Sullivan Dr. 
Westport, MA 02790 

Marsha A. Ouimette 

6 Prince Path 
Sandwich, MA 02563 

Laura L. Oxford 

P.O. Box 55 

Buzzards Bay, MA 02532 

Donna M. Phillips 

21 Wilson St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Sandra L. Pacheco 

16 Hopkins Rd. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Melinda A. Packard 

22 Bellavista Drive 
Pocasset, MA 02559 

Karen L. Paiva 

5455 N. Main St. Unit 17e 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Kelly A. Paley 

83 Norfolk St. 
Walpole, MA 02081 

Jennifer A. Palmer 

171 Dayton St. 
Springfield, MA 01118 

Lynnann Palmieri 

25 Dartmouth St. 
Bristol, RI 02809 

Mark Panico 

191 Prospect Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Diane K. Pankiewicz 

134 Nyes Ln. 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Patrick D. Pannese, Jr. 

24 Purcell Dr. 
Billerica, MA 01821 

Angela M. Park 

4 Jefferson Ave. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Lisa M. Pascal 

43 Worcester St. 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Pamela S. Patenaude 

13 Concord St. 
Chicopee, MA 01020 

Claudine A. Patneaude 

355 W. Britannia St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Bonnie J. Patt 

2 Off Schoosett St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Wayne D. Pavao 

531 E. Main St. 

Fall River, MA 02724 

Patrick J. Pearce 

24 Blake St. 
Boston, MA 02126 

Virginia C. Pearce 

616 Washington Street 
South Easton, MA 02375 

Adam Pearl 

Bayberry Vlg. 
Orleans, MA 02653 

David I. Pearlstein 

10 Atlas Road 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Brian A. Pearson 

886 Cherry Apt. 1 
Fall River, MA 02720 



Nancy A. Peckham 

1938 Main Rd. 
Tiverton, MA 02878 

Kimberly M. Pellerin 

19 Sanders Ave. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Kimberly M. Pelletier 

173 Bayside Ave. 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Sharlene D. Pelletier 

56 St. Joseph St. Apt. 116F 
Fall River, MA 02723 

Susan B. Pelletier 

56 St. Joseph St. Apt. 118 E 
Fall River, MA 02723 

Suzanne R. Pepin 

14 Bardsley Street 
Acushnet, MA 02743 

Richard M. Pepoli 

74 Lowell St. 
Somerville, MA 02143 

John A. Peppe 

13 Sherman Dr. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Mary R. Percy 

405 Davisville Rd. 

E. Falmouth, MA 02536 

Alberto Pereira 

81 Winchester St. 6 
Brookline, MA 02146 

David J. Pereira 

27 Meadow Rd. 
Medway, MA 02053 

James M. Pereira 

121 Ashfield Dr. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Louis A. Pereira 

95 Healy St. 

Fall River, MA 02723 

Christopher M. Perra 

878 Bay St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Allison L. Perry 

45 Ralph Rd. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Cheryl L. Perry 

317 Belair St. 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Ginamarie Perry 

8 Killeen Rd. 

E. Walpole, MA 02032 

Susan M. Perry 

47 Pat-ree Dr. 

E. Taunton, MA 02718 

Richard J. Persia 

255 Bradstreet Avenue 
Revere, MA 02151 

Ellen M. Peterson 

12 Merrymount Rd. 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 

Helen F. Peterson 

99 Pratt Street 
Avon, MA 02322 

James R. Peterson 

9 Ettrick St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Vincent Petrillo 

2 Leonard Cir. 
Medford, MA 02155 

Michelle L. Petti 

9 Holly's Lane 

N. Easton, MA 02356 

Dorothy K. Petze 

293 Lincoln Street 
N. Easton, MA 02356 

Joanne M. Pezone 

12 Seymour Place 
White Plains, NY 10605 

Catherine B. Phillipson 

83 Locust St. 
Holliston, MA 01746 

Constance E. Picariello 



328 



140 Boxwood Ln. 


Holbrook, MA 02343 


Joseph P. Re illy 


Bridgewater, MA 02324 


Dawn E. Prussman 


P.O. Box 75 

1-1. .11 \A A nnn/ic 

null, MA UzU4o 


Heather E. Pike 


26 Conant St. 


147 Fair Oak Rd. 


N. Quincy, MA 02171 


Lynne A. Reinhalter 


opnngtield, MA Ullzo 
Robert M. Pimental 


Raymond J. Puglisi 

6 Sibley Ter. 


560 Summer St. 
Abington, MA 02351 


99 n*>»no Street 


Manrhpctor NH 0*31 0^ 


Jacquelyn L. Remillard 


Fairhaven, MA Uz719 
Mary C. Pimentel 


Jean E. Puricelli 

10 Shaw Place 


1 T7 1 £ J *T* 

177 Leyfred Ter. 
Springfield, MA 01108 




Foxboro MA 02035 


Michelle G. Reopell 


Bridgewater, MA 02324 


Barbara A. Putnam 


85 Tremont St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 


William M. Pimentel 


36 Boston Road 


98 Ruth Ellen Rd. 


N. Billerica, MA 01862 


Daniel Rezendes 


Kaynnam, MA Uz/o/ 


Melanie I. Quental 


66 Mayflower Ave Apt. 23 
Middleboro, MA 02346 


Maria E. Pina 


451 S. Beach St. 


vJ*t rviuycwuuu jl. 


Fall River MA 02724 


John A. Ricci 


p AC i An MA H91 99 

Boston, mm uzizz 
Patricia A. Pinnetti 


Christen M. Quigley 

76 Rose Land Ter. 


7 Kennedy Ln. 
Walpole, MA U^Uol 


1 1 Harrison Avenue 


Marqtnn? Hill MA 09648 


Kevin M. Richards 


buzzards bay, MA UZooZ 


Andrea M. Quinn 


18/ opark ot. 
Drockton, ma u^^uz 


Christopher J. Pinney 


110 Main St. 




Rockport, MA 01966 


Stephen H. Richards 


Kockland, MA vzo/v 


Jeanne C. Quist 


92 Pennybrook Rd. 

I . \A A A1 one 

Lynn, MA UlyUo 


Lubelia M. Pires 


139 Cherry Street 


398 Ferry St. 


Bridgewater, MA 02324 


Sherry A. Richmond 


rail Kiver, MA U^/^l 


Cynthia Randall 


Ill West btreet 


w. Bridgewater, ma uzo/y 


Paul M. Pironti 


147 Colonial Drive 


^9 NnrtVi A 1/0 
Jl llUlUl nve. 


Fairfiolrl CT 06430 


Vardis J. Riel 


Mendon, MA Ul/oo 


Colleen M. Raftery 

63 Clark St. 


45 Conant St. 


Harold A. Plant, Jr. 


D.:>4nm ■ mA>._ \lf A HOOO/I 

Bridgewater, ma UiCjZ4 


1050 Maple St. 


Dedham, MA 02026 


Kelly A. Riendeau 


Manstield, MA UZU48 


Gary G. Rahilly 


walnut ni. Kd. 


D„- A ma runnel 
Barre, ma uiuuo 


Susann M. Plett 


392 Ash Street 


P.O. Box 1951 


Brockton, MA 02401 


Theodore Ringold 


Uuxoury, MA U^ool 
Marlene H. Pluta 


Denise C. Ralston 

22 Mahoney Avenue 


io iNelson Ur. Apt. Z-c 
nandoipn, ma uzooo 


7R Pierre RnaH 


Stoughton, MA 02072 


Kathleen M. Ripley 


W. Brookiield, MA Olooo 
Kim A. Poirier 


Michele A. Ranese 

70 Myricks St. 


101 Duggan St. 

C*/... n k(A« MA AOH70 

otougnton, ma uzu/^ 


175 Trenton St. 


Berkley, MA 02779 


Kim J. Ripley 


hast boston, MA Uzlzo 


Debra Raposo 


307 Hancock Street 


Braintree, ma uziH't 


James K. Polk 


143 Feno Ct. 


1 "38 Dak St 


Snmoreot MA 0979f> 
OUi I lei at: L, l»in \JC I £.\J 


Sandra L. Rivet 


iNorton, MA uz/oo 


Wendy E. Rapson 


££*3 CAknn] Ci vnA l 

oDj ocnool otreet 


iNortn uignton, ma uz/o't 


Susan G. Pollard 


277 Centre Ave. 


712 Mystic Ave. 


Ahinntnn MA 093 c >1 


Amy-Beth Roach 


T n ...1.«.U.. .... . liJl A QH£L 

1 ewksDury, MA Ulo/o 


Jennifer E. Reagan 


r.u. Box yo^ yoo Main ot. 
Dennis, MA uzooo 


Stephanie L. Ponte 


Harvey Rd. 


57 Chavenson St. 


Wnrthinntnn MA 01098 


Kimberly A. Robbins 


Pall D;tio<- MA 

rail Kiver, MA \jclco 


Stephen R. Reardon 


1 1 Willard Avenue 


Brockton, MA UZ4UZ 


Tracey E. Porter 


151 Arnold St. 


K4 Alms Rrl 


Rraintrpp MA 091 84 


Scott A. Robbins 


ralmoutn, MA v*cdW 


Melissa C. Redfern 


4/ wneeier cir. 


otougnton, MA VcVit. 


Terrilyn Post 


111 Brigham St. Unit 12E 


1371 PloacAnt Stroot 


HnHcnn MA 01 74Q 


Marie E. Robicheau 


brockton, MA UZ4U1 


Eileen E. Redler 


lo Lastle Kock otreet 


nAr/.hnc+A» ma r\9i otk 
Dorchester, MA uzizo 


Heidi C. Potier 


15 Dwelley St. 


6 South Lillian Street 


Pomhrnlcp MA 09^ t iQ 


Ellyn M. Robinson 


Kandolpn, MA UZooo 


Cristine L. Reed 


or\ \A -> »I>;«a— _u c+ 

£\j Mackintosh ot. 
rrankiin, ma u^uoo 


Michelle Powell 


101 Fremont St. 


1^0 Rumfrtr/H Alio Ant 10^ 


Tanntnn MA 09780 


Tracy A. Rocha 


Manstield, MA Uz(J4-o 


Doreen E. Reed 


co£. unnneii ot. 


C-»ll D:*. A «. M A n9791 

rail Kiver, MA uz/zl 


Maura A. Powers 


50 Fremont St. Apt 2 


JO WcalWUUU rKy. 


Tanntnn MA 09780 


Kerin M. Roche 


boutnbridge, MA UlooU 


Marian H. Reed 


do I emple ot. 

M^t^n^n MA HO 1 O 

Matapan, ma u^izo 


Wendy J. Pratt 


621 S. Crane Ave. 


52a Massasoit Avenue 


TanntAn MA 09780 


Michael J. Rode He 


t_I..1t UA f\r*r\A C 

Mull, MA 02045 


Steven E. Rego 


1U [Nicholas Kd. 


Kaynham, MA o^/o/ 


Donna M. Preskenis 


4 Rocky Hill Road 


1 9 burrow RH 


Aeeonot MA 09709 


Shawn T. Rogan 


HI ] VIA f\C~l f\/~_ O 

Norwood, MA 02062 


Theresa M. Rego 


308 Somerset Ave. 


1 aunton, MA UZ/ou 


Kristin I. Prohaska 


1 New Water Street 


1 Ahhow St 
l\j nuwy 01. 


MirlHIohnrn MA 09^4fi 


Debra J. Rogers 


Pan/4/iUk MA ClO'Z&Q 

nandoipn, ma uzooo 


Robin L. Reichman 


1 A rtl/1 U'Afifl Rrl 

io \JiQ oou i\Q. 

M A^fl^U^r^ MA H97An 

in. Attieooro, ma uz/ou 


Jodi Promisel 


139 Pine Grove Dr. 


148 Pine Grove Drive 


&rr\r\iirin MA 09401 


Elizabeth Rogers 


Brockton, MA 0^401 


Judy L. Reid 


88 Bellevue Ave. 


Somerset, MA 02723 


Lisa J. Prouty 


69 Highland Ave. 


427 Water St. 


Arlington, MA 02174 


Sheryl A. Rokus 


Bridgewater, MA 02324 


15 Heath St. 


Patricia L. Reid 


Brockton, MA 02402 


Richard P. Provenzano 


33 Clearwater Drive 


12 Hillsdale Road 


Plymouth, MA 02360 


Kelly A. Rooney 



67 Barouche Dr. 


Kristina L. Sakellis 


Marshfield, MA 02050 


363 Ohio Ave. 


Robert P. Rose 


W. Springfield, MA 01089 


44 Ridge wood Dr. 


Daniel Salas 


Norwood, MA 02062 


27 Brigham St. 


Rhonda S. Ross 


Whitman, MA 02382 


9 Sherman St. 


Maureen J. Saliba 


roxboro, MA 02035 


15 Woodburn Dr. 


Robert A. Rossi 


Methuen, MA 01844 


63 Mcgarvey Rd. 


Felicia A. Salser 


Stoughton, MA 02072 


135 Forest Ave. 


Michael S. Rothberg 


Hudson, MA 01749 


12 Worrall Rd. 


Deanna C. Sammons 


Plymouth, MA 02360 


112 Day Blvd. 


Lisa M. Rowe 


Newport, RI 02840 


2 Palm Dr. 


Cynthia M. Sanguedolce 


Greenland, NH 03840 


23 Hidden Rd. 


Laurette M. Roy 


Methuen, MA 01844 


18 Clay Pond Road 


Helene Y. Sansoucy 


Monument Beach, MA 02553 


1 Main St. 


Matthew P. Rucando 


Wareham, MA 02571 


116 Immokolee Drive 


G. J. Santos 


Portsmouth, RI 02871 


103 East St. 


Jeanne-Marie Rusk 


E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 


11 Colbert St. 


Michael A. Saporito 


W. Roxbury, MA 02132 


P.O. 434 7 Crimson Ln. 


Michelle L. Russ 


Housatonic, MA 01236 


16 Euston St. #2 


Cheri E. Saraiva 


Brookline, MA 02146 


23 Hartley Ave. 


James C. Russell 


Brockton, MA 02402 


160 William Kelly Rd. 


Annette P. Sarty 


Stoughton, MA 02072 


2 East St. 


Diana M. Ryan 


Brockton, MA 02402 


P.O. Box 82 


Paula M. Satinoff 


Lincoln, MA 01773 


276 Plymouth Avenue 


John C. Ryan 


E. Wareham, MA 02538 


40 Thatcher St. 


Elizabeth J. Saunders 


Carver, MA 02330 


348 Emmett St. 


Robin M. Ryan 


Fall River, MA 02721 


60 Arlington St. 


James C. Saunders 


Rockland, MA 02370 


460 Page St. 


Michael S. Ryder 


Avon, MA 02322 


36 Tananger Rd. 


Kathleen J. Saunders 


Hyannis, MA 02601 


13 Locust Avenue 


Gerard J. Rymill 


Rehoboth, MA 02769 


61 Farragut Ave. 


David J. Savaria 


Somerville, MA 02144 


1366 Drift Rd. 


Renee M. Saba 


Westport, MA 02790 


8 Millbrook Ave. 


Maureen A. Scanlon 


Walpole, MA 02081 


24 Midvale Rd. 


Chris J. Sabato 


West Roxbury, MA 02132 


31 Haines Blvd. 


Brian R. Scannell 


Port Chester, NY 10573 


10 Alder Rd. 


Toni J. Sabella 


Holbrook, MA 02343 


31 Gledhill Ave. 


Joan Schlatz 


Everett, MA 02149 


25 Ball Ave. 


Rebecca K. Sage 


Bridgewater, MA 02324 


150 Samoset Ave. 




Quincy, MA 02169 






329 




Pamela R. Schneider 

3 County Street 
Lakeville, MA 02347 

Catherine F. Scholfield 

78 Church St. 
Guilford, CT 06437 

Paula J. Schonheinz 

43 Pleasant St. 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Barbara E. Schultz 

27 Tinkers Ledge Road 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Stephen F. Schwartz 

286 Main St. 

Cherry Vly., MA 01611 

Wendy E. Schwartz 

10 Curtis Street 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Jennifer M. Scott 

115 Pond St. P.O. Box 369 
E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Daniel J. Scribner 

35 Glen Mobil Pk. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Michelle A. Sedani 

372 Crescent Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Anju Seekri 

26 Boardman Ln. 

South Attleboro, MA 02703 

Lauretta I. Seggelin 

116 Palmer Mill Rd. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Thomas F. Sellers 

35 Fairview Ave. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Erin M. Senier 

3 Nixon St. 

Dorchester, MA 02124 

Crystal L. Senna 

RR2 4 Fearing HI. Rd. 
Wareham, MA 02571 

David M. Sergi 

17 Overlook Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Shon R. Servis 

5 Dog Lane P.O. Box 59 
Marshfield HI., MA 02051 

Paul J. Sessa 

31 Pine Street 
Duxbury, MA 02332 

Sandra B. Shadoff 

146 Greenbrook Dr. 



Stoughton, MA 02072 

James M. Shaffer, Jr. 

78 G St. 

Hull, MA 02045 

Stephanie R. Shaw 

25 Melanie Cir. 
Seekonk, MA 02771 

Donna M. Shea 

179 Milton St. 
Quincy, MA 02170 

David C. Sheehan 

49 Grove Street 
Stoughton, MA 02072 

Katie T. Sheehan 

10 Bateson Dr. 
Andover, MA 01810 

Darren R. Shepardson 

56 Lime Kiln Rd. 
Lenox, MA 01240 

John E. Sherman 

99 High St. 

North Attleboro, MA 02760 

Joseph H. Sherman 

47 Althea Rd. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Margaret M. Shields 

73 Bartlett St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Esmeralda C. Silva 

25 Steve Dr. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Lasalette M. Silva 

1082 Elsbree St. 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Joseph T. Silveira 

186 Madison St. 
Maiden, MA 02148 

Shari J. Simard 

68 Matignon Rd. 
Cambridge, MA 02140 

Donna E. Simmons 

18 Speaker St. 

North Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Donna L. Simmons 

17 Manchester Rd. 
Yarmouth, MA 02675 

Katherine E. Simpson 

87 East St., Box 57 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02337 

Christopher J. Sissons, Jr. 

75 Myers Ave. . 
Abington, MA 02351 

James M. Skehan 



4 Wildwood St. 
Burlington, MA 01803 

Cynthia L. Slamin 

26 Brook St. 
Franklin, MA 02038 

Colleen M. Slowey 

31 Junes Ln. 

E. Sandwich, MA 02537 

Allison M. Smith 

22 Gov. Andrew Rd. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Ambrose J. Smith 

559 Hixville Rd. 
Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Brian P. Smith 

63 Webb St. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Claire L. Smith 

68 Highland Street 
South Easton, MA 02375 

Dineen M. Smith 

453 Nahatan Street 
Norwood, MA 02062 

James F. Smith 

658 Winter St. 

East Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Nancy J. Smith 

760 Plain Street 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Shannon M. Smith 

4 Emerson Ave. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Jennifer A. Snelgrove 

167 Channing Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Leslie A. Snow 

RR 3 Box 770 
Wiscasset, ME 04578 

Donna E. Solari 

109 Pleasant St. 
Plympton, MA 02367 

Robert G. Solomons 

177 Garfield Ave. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Valerie A. Sorrenti 

590 Bedford St. 
Abington, MA 02351 

Cynthia M. Sousa 

13 Lincoln St. 
Lakeville, MA 02346 

George C. Sousa 

328 Oakland Street 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Ann M. Souza 

91 So. Main Street 
Raynham, MA 02767 

Christine M. Souza 

52 Pat-ree Dr. 

East Taunton, MA 02718 

Joseph P. Spencer 

24 Burrill Avenue 
Lynn, MA 01902 

Teresa A. Spencer 

37 Arch St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

James R. Sperzel 

Hacker Rd. Ext. 
Freeport, ME 04032 

Edward T. Spillane 

93 Edward Street 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Karen Spratt 

1400 Williams St. 
Dighton, MA 02715 

Jennier L. Spruce 

92 Leroi Dr. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Joanne K. Staff 

42 Loring Rd. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Mary K. Staff ier 

20 Hopedale St. 



Mendon, MA 01756 

Raymond R. Stagg 

14 Kennebec Street 
Mattapan, MA 02126 

Henry J. Staines 

56 Keystone St. 

West Roxbury, MA 02132 

James C. Stearns 

23 Live Oak Drive 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Nancy M. Stewart 

60 King St. 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Apryl M. Stith 

155 Auburn St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Carol A. Stjohn 

P.O. Box 54 
Cummaquid, MA 02637 

Kristine L. Stoddard 

182 Perkins Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Gary R. Stone 

24 Himoor Cir. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Ueen B. Stone 

7 Greenberg Circle 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Christopher J. Storer 

17 Mt. Vernon St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Denise L. Stout 

56 Clifford St. Apt. 3 
New Bedford, MA 02745 

Coryann Strout 

70 Thompson St. 
Ashland, NH 03217 

Lisa A. Studholme 

491 Sherman St. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Amy M. Sullivan 

227 Orchard St. 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Carrie E. Sullivan 

26 Allerton St. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Diana L. Sullivan 

82 Putnam St. 
Winthrop, MA 02152 

Elizabeth Sullivan 

318 Prospect St. 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Maria L. Sullivan 

132 Hillberg Avenue 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Paula A. Sullivan 

6 Roberts Road 
Canton, MA 02021 

Susan B. Sullivan 

48 Chabot St. 
Westport, MA 02790 

Shirley A. Sutherland 

595 Wood Street 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Lisa J. Sutton 

1118 Hanover Street 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Dana Svendsen 

60 Carlisle Rd. 
Bedford, MA 01730 

Kathleen E. Swansey 

55 Vine St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Kimberly A. Swanson 

1 Nottingham Dr. 
Raynham, MA 02767 

David J. Sweeney 

2 Alona Avenue 
Monument Beach, MA 02553 

Pamela R. Sweeney 

1 Chattanooga Rd. 
Ipswich, MA 01938 



Thomas C. Sweeney 

155 Leavitt St. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Mark D. Switzer 

25 Day St. 

N. Easton, MA 02356 

Christine M. Sylvester 

578 Torrey St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Cari A. Sylvia 

173 Rounds St. 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Catherine E. Sylvia 

13 Terrence Ave. 

East Falmouth, MA 02536 

Gina Sylvia 

85 Huttleston Avenue 
Fairhaven, MA 02719 

Richard E. Sylvia, Jr. 

215 Hodges St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Sheree A. Sylvia 

180 Frank Street 

New Bedford, MA 02740 

Thomas J. Synan 

P.O. Box 407 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Delores Tambascia 

17 Gaudette Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Mengfong Tan 

19 Shaw Rd. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Siu Ling Tang 

249 Massachusetts Avenue 
Providence, RI 02905 

Julie A. Tankis 

1 Elm Street 
Whitinsville, MA 01588 

Jane M. Taris 

53 Garden Pky. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Elizabeth J. Tassinari 

19 Bay Colony Dr. 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Melissa A. Tatro 

449 Churchill St. 
Pittsfield, MA 01201 

Matthew J. Tavares 

22 Acorn St. 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Tanya Tereshko 

72 Pond St. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Jeffrey P. Terrio 

110 Bakers Path 

South Yarmouth, MA 02664 

Natercia C. Teves 

201 Harrison St. 
Fall River, MA 02723 

Ann M. Therrien 

489 Berkley St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Elizabeth A. Therrien 

489 Berkley St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Deborah A. Thibeault 

34 Poplar Rd. 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Laurie A. Thomas 

53 Silver Rd. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Michael J. Thomas 

32 Madison Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Steven J. Thomas 

87 Brantwood St. 
Norwell, MA 02061 

Daniel L. Thompson 

37 Monroe Street 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Lisa M. Thompson 



330 



118 Colwell Drive 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Matthew K. Thompson 

49 South St. 

Westborough, MA 01581 

Lee- Ann M. Thorns 

179 Ash St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Carol J. Thomson 

154 Billings St. 
Sharon, MA 02067 

Laurie A. Thomson 

P.O. Box 242 
Groveland, MA 01834 

Jennifer A. Thome 

72 South St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Michael R. Thorpe 

88 Pacific St. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Tracey L. Thrasher 

75 Bryant St. 

W. Bridgewater, MA 02379 

Patricia A. Tierney 

290 Richmond Street 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Jennie S. Tigano 

207 B-2 Winthrop St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Kathleen P. Tinsley 

P.O. Box 2765 
Hyannis, MA 02601 

Jane C. Tolan 

27 Grenville Rd. 
Watertown, MA 02172 

Jean M. Tolan 

107 Damon Rd. 
Rockland, MA 02370 

Pamela A. Toland 

158 Forest St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Martin G. Tolson 

89 Narragansett Rd. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Joanne M. Toomey 

125 Summer St. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Cheryl A. Topping 

236 Plymouth St. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Janet M. Tortora 

17 Glover Rd. 
Needham, MA 02194 

William P. Toth 

23 Edward Cody Ln. 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 

Peter J. Tourigny 

51 Pineridge Rd. 
Buzzards Bay, MA 02532 

Leeanne Travelo 

629 Setucket Rd. 
East Dennis, MA 02641 

Christopher W. Travers 

26 Everett St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Lisa M. Tripoli 

332 Mountain Ave. 
Revere, MA 02151 

Helen E. Tripp 

44 Constellation Rd. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Kimberly L. Trotter 

24 Sunrise Dr. 
Hudson, MA 03051 

Huong T. Truong 

10 Casa Dr. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Charles P. Tsouprake 

25 Morelands Street 
New Bedford, MA 02740 

Jeff H. Tucker 

Scott Hall Room 326 



Bridgewater, MA 02325 

Lauren A. Turke 

21 Virginia St. 
Milton, MA 02186 

Marilyn J. Turner 

661 Main Street 
Cotuit, MA 02635 

Stephen A. Turner 

14 Winslow Road 
Chelmsford, MA 01824 

Kathleen M. Unwin 

5 Cedar St. 
Halifax, MA 02338 

Robin A. Urbati 

10 Kimball Beach Rd. 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Richard G. Vaillancourt Jr. 

P.O. Box 1165 
Newport, RI 02840 

Dena L. Valatkevicz 

1737 Washington St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Jeffrey T. Valin 

35 Benton Rd. 
Belmont, MA 02178 

Karen A. Valis 

12 Haskell St. 
Westboro, MA 01581 

Michelle L. Vallancourt 

559 Gorwin Dr. 
Hanson, MA 02341 

Kristen E. VanDyke 

P.O. Box 517 Old Hardwick Rd. 
Barre, MA 01005 

Anja Vanhagens 

2 Edes St. Apt. 1-c 
Plymouth, MA 02360 

Leslie A. Varnerin 

22 Talbot Rd. 
Canton, MA 02021 

Rita M. Varrasso 

144 St. Claire St. 
Braintree, MA 02184 

Annmarie Verville 

374 Belair St. 

New Bedford, MA 02745 

Paula J. Vespaziani 

8 Pine Tree Drive 
Middleborough, MA 02346 

Lorie L. Vieira 

267 Winthrop St. 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Patricia H. Viera 

15 Restful Lane 

E. Wareham, MA 02538 

Manjit Virdi 

172 Elliot St. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Joyce M. Viveiros 

299 Sprague Street 
Fall River, MA 02724 

Suzanne E. Vliet 

12 Riverview Ave. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Edward T. Voelker, Jr. 

11 Greenwood Road 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Phyllis A. Voit 

249 High St. 
Rochester, MA 02770 

Julie E. Wade 

17 Monica Street 
Taunton, MA 02780 

Nancy G. Wade 

36 Hewes Road 
Scituate, MA 02066 

Lisa M. Wagener 

P.O. Box 163 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Mark R. Wagner 

95 Walnut St. 
Abington, MA 02351 



Dianne R. Walenius 

15 Dana Rd. 
Weymouth, MA 02188 

Janet A. Walker 

90 Presidential 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Scott M. Wallace 

52 Sycamore St. 
Swansea, MA 02777 

Donna M. Walsh 

123 Morningside Path 
East Weymouth, MA 02189 

Elizabeth A. Walsh 

8 Baltimore St. 
Millis, MA 02054 

Joanne M. Walsh 

5 White Pine Ln. 
Carver, MA 02330 

Julie A. Walsh 

54 Middlesex St. 

North Quincy, MA 02171 

Thomas A. Walsh 

228 W. Elm St. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Stephen L. Wands 

136 Cambridge St. 
Feeding Hills, MA 01030 

Edmund F. Ward 

19 Lydon Ln. 
Kingston, MA 02364 

Pauline M. Ward 

4 Pine Way P.O. Box 565 
Carver, MA 02330 

Craig F. Wardle 

52 Oakside Ave. 
Lawrence, MA 01844 

Jacqueline A. Ware 

100 Ardsley Cir. 
Brockton, MA 02402 

Cathleen T. Warren 

354 Franklin St. 
Mansfield, MA 02048 

Derek C. Wassel 

24 Audubon Dr. 
Walpole, MA 02081 

James W. Waters 

35 Deacon St. 

South Yarmouth, MA 02664 

Elisabeth A. Wayda 

P.O. Box 233 

N. Eastham, MA 02651 

Joseph P. Weathers 

12 Hidden Valley Rd. 
Lynnfield, MA 01940 

Cynthia S. Webber 

184 Bay Rd. 

N. Easton, MA 02356 

Karen L. Weiner 

397 Bridge St. 

E. Bridgewater, MA 02333 

Annmarie C. Weir 

5 Brookfield Rd. 
Methuen, MA 01844 

Eric R. Weiss 

234 River Rd. 
Killingworth, CT 06417 

Bonnie J. Welch 

76 Glen St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Joseph M. Welch 

10 Barberry Ln. 
Norwood, MA 02062 

Robin M. Wells 

38 Bridge St. 
Lakeville, MA 02346 

Jo- Anne M. Westgate 

23a Downie St. P.O. Box 9108 
N. Dartmouth, MA 02747 

Catherine M. Wetherbee 

18 Carole Avenue 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Pamela J. Wheeler 



1 1 Volunteer Road 
Hingham, MA 02043 

Wendy A. Wheeler 

51 Forum Rd. 
Quincy, MA 02169 

Paloma L. Wheetley 

25 Palmer St. 
Arlington, MA 02174 

Brian S. Whidden 

418 Greenlodge St. 
Dedham, MA 02026 

Stephen C. Whitcomb 

158 Gr. Neck Rd. 
Wareham, MA 02571 

Virginia White 

65 Temple St. 
Whitman, MA 02382 

Michael R. Whitelaw 

26 Hillcrest Dr. 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Janice L. Wightman 

15 Warner St. 
Greenfield, MA 01301 

Donna M. Wilbur 

P.O. Box 1035 
Sandwich, MA 02563 

Deborah J. Wilcox 

172 Burgess Road 
Somerset, MA 02726 

Lori K. Wilensky 

48 Niles Rd. 
Randolph, MA 02368 

Valerie S. Wilkey 

206 Upper County Rd. 
S. Dennis, MA 02660 

Joseph H. Wilkins 

P.O. Box 572 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Jennifer A. Wilkinson 

518 Weetamoe Street 
Fall River, MA 02720 

Cheryl A. Williams 

8 Association Ave. lr 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Floyd M. Williams Jr. 

119 Bedford St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Thomas F. Williams 

179 Packard St. 
Avon, MA 02322 

Debra S. Willis 

4 Hillside Ave. 
Melrose, MA 02176 

Cheryl A. Wilson 

285 Summit Rd. 
Abington, MA 02351 

Cynthia W. Wilson 

24 White Street 

S. Weymouth, MA 02190 



Laura A. Winmill 

215 Birch Street 
Pembroke, MA 02359 

Linda J. Winship 

118 Randall Street 
North Easton, MA 02356 

John J. Wolongevicz 

172 Old Town Way 
Hanover, MA 02339 

Hollianne Wood 

292 Hillberg Ave. 
Brockton, MA 02401 
t 

Nancy B. Wood 

60 Forest Dr. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Donald M. Woodcock, Jr. 

10 Norton Glen Rd. 122 
Norton, MA 02766 

Kristine S. Wordell 

4 Perry Ave. 
Mattapoisett, MA 02739 

Jacquelyne Wyatt 

P.O. Box 700 

W. Falmouth, MA 02574 

Gretchen M. Yoder 

17 Temple Rd. 
Marshfield, MA 02050 

Daniel J. Young 

280 Old Oaken Bucket 
Scituate, MA 02066 

John W. Young 

23 Granite Street 
Abington, MA 02351 

Victoria Zahos 

368 Prospect St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Alyson J. Zammltti 

3 Sherburne Rd. 
Lexington, MA 02173 

Jeffrey Zaveloff 

279 Main St. 
Bridgewater, MA 02324 

Charles V. Zizzo 

82 Fuller St. 
Brockton, MA 02401 

Daniel B. Zonderman 

31 Susan Rd. 

South Weymouth, MA 02190 






fid 




337 




338 




339 




341 




343 



T 
H 
E 

H 
I 
L 
L 




351 




353 



s 
c 
o 

T 
T 

H 
A 
L 
L 




359 




363 




365 



^ 9 




The 150th year at Bridge water State 
College finds Greek life stronger than 
ever. And if this trend holds, it will con- 
tinue to grow stronger. There are ten 
fraternities and sororities at the college, 
and their numbers are growing. All of 
these groups strive for excellence in com- 
munity service, academics, education, in- 
dividuality, and personal growth and 
want what's best for the college. Greeks 
are experiencing much support from the 
college and are returning that same sup- 
port back to the college. The Greek sys- 
tem at BSC has adopted a motto which is 
"Don't let Greek Life pass you by." 

During the past year, fraternities and 
sororities have raised thousands of dol- 
lars for charities and public service 
groups. From the Gamma Phi Beta Rock- 
a-Thon to Sigma Tau Gamma's Softball 
Tournament and from Sigma Pi's sleep- 
out for the homeless to Sigma Chi's Der- 
by Days; all these reflect the very best 
these members and the college have to 
offer. 

The Greeks even take time out to have 
fun, as was evident in this year's Greek 
Week '90 festivities. The competition 
was as fierce as ever, and no one left a 
loser; they were all winners. 

As the Greek system looks toward the 
next several years, it appears that the 
current growth trend will hold and the 
groups will continue to become an in- 
tegral part of life at BSC. Greeks are on 
the move at BSC. And as they move, so 
does the college community. 



GREEKS 




and lots., lots more. 



368 



AHP 




Alpha Eta Rho 



rnB 




Gamma Phi Beta 



Front row: Joanne Anderson, Kathy Unwin, Pam McDonough, Robyn Baker, Elaine 
Doherty, Felicia Salser, Stephanie Kennedy, Camille Grasso. 
Second row: Kimi Cook, Kim Molle. 

Third row: Megan O'Donnell, Beth Vadala, Kathy Hughes, Gina DiCarlo, Mimi 
Comeau, Judy Grenier, Pam Rymanowski. 

Fourth row: Linda Lima, Suzanne Bouvier, Kristen Doane, Dee-ann Bettgenhauser, 

Laura Owens, Lynne Haberstroh, Carol Christofferson, Kristy Freedman. 

Back row: Amy Reynolds, Susan Little, Sharon Orso, Grace DeAbreu, Sue Whalen. 




370 



#22 




Phi Sigma Sigma 



Front row: Lisa Pascal, Cindy Stefanick, Annmarie Weir, Sandy Gentile, Brenda 
Zellen, Lauren Cunningham, Jennifer Tomaso, Erin Browne, Marilyn Richard. 
Second row: Melanie Maloney, Amy Law, Cathleen Warren, Pamela Holm, Christine 
Graham, Andrea Ayer, Kelly Chase, Roberta Tagluri. 

Back row: Cindy Holt, Julie Grey, Tracey Harrington, Renee Buckman, Jennifer 
Braman, Mary Ellen DeRoche, Susie Krippendorf. 





371 




Sigma Chi 

Front row: Stephen Hoffman, Anthony Boccuzzo, Jeff Gorton, Dave Rumrill. 
Back row: Stephen Ross, Jim Hennemann, Damon Bell, Johnny Gun. 




372 




373 



<s>X 




Theta Chi 




Front row: Tony LaCourse, Mark Viola, Paul Cangiano, George 
Douglas, Robert Bry. 

Second row: Kary Shumway, Tim O'Brien, Steve O'Neil, Chuck 
Hart, John Powers. 

Back row: Timothy Campbell, Jonathan Dyer, Joseph Lange, 
Adam Wolkan, Thomas Thacker. 



374 



Derby D D D D....Days 



rhe Brothers of Sigma Chi began 
their annual Derby Days events 
in Tuesday, April 24, and the fes- 
ivities ran through Saturday, April 
!8. In the process of having fun and 
earn rivalries, which involved over 
00 women from the college com- 
ieting in various field events with 
heir Sigma Chi captain, the mem- 
ers of Sigma Chi managed to raise 
ver $1000 for the Bridgewater 
itate College Children's Physical 
)evelopmental Clinic. 
Derby Daze was kicked off on 
uesday, April 24, with a banner 
ompetition. Each team made a 
anner, which had to include the 
aternity letters and a reference to 



the event's sponsor, Bud Light. 

Other Derby Days events during 
the week included: a Derby dec- 
orating contest; Capture the Derby, 
when each brother wore a derby 
and members of the other teams 
tried to capture as many as they 
could; Make Me Smile contest; and 
the annual lip-sync contest. 

The week was culminated with 
the finals of the lip-sync contest on 
Saturday, April 28. Songs such as 
Grandma Got Run Over by a Rein- 
deer, Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yel- 
low Polka-Dot Bikini, and Copa- 
cabana were some of the 'all time' 
favorites performed for the crowd 
which gathered to see the event. 



The winner of this event was Jim 
Waters' team which did the Barry 
Manilow favorite "Copacabana." 
The part of the showgirl, Lola, was 
played by Doug Eckelkamp. 

Next up for the teams was the 
dunking booth contest. Bud Light 
supplied the brothers with the 
booth and also supplied the team 
members with some form of re- 
venge. Each team got to choose 
any brother they wanted in order to 
try and dunk him. 

Moving on to field events, Derby 
Daddy Dave Rumrill had a variety 
of 'unusualities' lined up for the 
teams. Such races included a limbo 
contest; a six woman 'pole race' in 



which the members of the team had 
to run 50 yards with a pole be- 
tween their legs; and a chicken fight 
contest, in which the captains of the 
team wore nylons, which contained 
eggs on their heads and had a 
teammate piggyback them. The 
teammate would then try to break 
the other team's eggs. 

The events lasted well into the 
afternoon and after all was said and 
done, a winning team was finally 
determined. The winning team for 
the day was Jeff Gorton's "Jeff's 
Jingle Bells." But in the long run, 
the real winning team was the Chil- 
dren's Physical Developmental 
Clinic. 




A The banners which 
were made by the 
team members in the 
Annual Derby Days 
event were displayed 
and teams waited to 
see who would win the 
competition. 



▲ 'Di\ <?, Dive, Dive)' was what many competitors were yelling and 
trying to make their opponents do during the Derby Days Dunking 
Booth competition. 

■4 Derby Daddy Dave Rumrill displays the winning Derby in the 
Derby Decoration Contest. Seen in the background is the winner of 
the team banner competition. 




376 





A -4 Susie Krippendorf , who was not part of one of the relay race 
teams, struts her stuff in support of her friends during the Derby 
Days' events. 

A ► Tracey Harrington poses here with a friend while watching 
the annual Derby Days Contest. 

■ -4 She was afraid to come out of the locker. She was as nervous 
as she could be. Why? 

A Spectators sit on the grass, enjoying the warm sunny day and 
the friendly sport of competition as they watch their friends 
compete in Sigma Chi's annual Derby Days field events. 
< Because they were in competition trying to win points in the 
Lip-Sync contest, performing "Itsy Bitsy Teenie Weenie Yellow 
Polka-Dot Bikini." 



377 



< Moving down the field is yet another 
team trying to record the best time during 
the pole relay race. 




▲ But, once the word was 
given, both competitors 
got into the swing of 
things, trying to beat the 
egg in the contest. 

•4 The showgirls of the 
Copacabana dance to 
Barry Manilow's famous 
song during the Derby 
Days Lip-Sync competi- 
tion. 



379 



G G....Greek Week I 



Storms through the Bridgewater Campus 



Greek Week '90 ran four days 
this year, instead of its usual 
three — from Thursday, April 5, to 
Sunday, April 8. This may not 
seem like such a noteworthy point 
but it is, due to the fact that an 
unusually late winter storm 
dumped several inches of snow on 
Saturday, postponing the field 
events. It is the first time snow has 
ever cancelled the events. But, 
while the temperatures were chilly 
Saturday, the snow disappeared 
and the competition, not to mention 
the the temperatures, heated up 
considerably on Sunday. 

Greek Week '90 began with the 
swimming events. Combining a va- 
riety of swimming techniques in re- 
lay race form, the eight fraternities 
and sororities in competition bat- 
tled it out to determine who was 



tops in the pool and who were the 
early leaders. Sigma Chi, Phi Sigma 
Sigma, and Sigma Pi came away 
the early leaders. 

On Friday afternoon, the Greek 
Week '90 Softball Tournament was 
held. The eight teams played a se- 
ries of one pitch, six outs and then a 
series of three outs a piece, with 
the winners advancing on, while the 
losers received a set number of 
points. The battle for first place 
between Sigma Pi and Sigma Tau 
Gamma came late in the afternoon. 
Try as they might, Sigma Tau Gam- 
ma proved no match for Sigma Pi's 
defense on the field. They won the 
game 3-0. At the end of two days, 
Sigma Pi lead, followed by Sigma 
Chi and Phi Sigma Sigma. 

After Saturday's snow melted 
away, the sun arrived and provided 



a great day for the final day of 
Greek competition. The first event 
was the obstacle course relay race. 
Here, Greeks had to vault a saw 
horse, fancy footwork their way 
through the tires, turn around 10 
times at the 'Dizzy Bat' station, 
then run and dive through a card- 
board box. Once they reached the 
end, they had to turn around and 
head back the way they came, this 
time sack racing 100 yards to a 
balance beam, making sure to take 
exactly four steps on it, and then a 
sprint to the finish to tag the next 
member of the team. 

The final three races would de- 
cide the winners of the day: the 
amoeba race, musical ice, and the 
car stuff. The amoeba race, when a 
team of ten all locked arms and run 
over a course of 100 yards was 



won by Sigma Pi. Musical ice was 
won by Sigma Pi and the Car Stuff, 
where teams stuffed as many of 
their players as they could into one 
car, was won by Phi Sigma Sigma, 
who crammed 20 members into the 
car. 

As Sunday concluded, the points 
were totaled and the winners were 
found. Sigma Pi won the event, 
with Sigma Chi in second. Close 
behind in third was Phi Sigma Sig- 
ma, and Sigma Tau Gamma was 
fourth. Alpha Eta Rho rounded out 
the top five, followed by Theta Chi, 
Gamma Phi Beta, and Delta Psi 
Rho. Whether they were winners or 
losers, one thought was on the 
minds of everyone in attendance: 
'wait until next year.' 



i 





384 




387 



The Good Deeds . . . 



Sigma Tau Gamma Slug it out for Big Brothers 



In late February, the newly formed fra- 
ternity Sigma Tau Gamma held its first 
annual Winterfest Softball Tournament. 
The title was appropriate, for the two 
days the teams in competition played, 
Saturday, February 24 and Sunday the 
25, over nine inches of snow fell. 

The tournament consisted of ten 
teams and more than 100 participants, 
playing in double-elimination fashion. 
Teams represented other fraternities, so- 
rorities, athletic groups, and various stu- 
dent organizations from the college. As 
the weekend went on, the number of 
teams got smaller until the last day of 
play came around. The finals came 
down to three teams. Despite the snow, 
poor playing conditions, and cold tem- 
peratures, the Hilltop Boys would prove 
victorious. Money raised from the Sigma 
Tau Gamma Winterfest Softball Tour- 
nament went to the Big Brother As- 
sociation of Brockton. 




Theta Chi Sweeps for Servic 





"J" he brothers of Theta Chi were looking for a 
* community service project on campus, and 
in late April, they found one. The fountain 
behind the Campus Center, which was in des- 
perate need of a paint job, became the choice 
for them. The project was begun on April 18, 
after a thorough cleaning, and was worked on 
until the first week of May. Theta Chi's painting 
of the fountain got the fountain back in working 
order, just in time for commencement exercises 
in May. 



388 




....That Greeks Do 

amma Phi Beta's Rock Around The Clock 




On Wednesday, May 2, the sisters of Gamma 
Phi Beta sorority held their annual Rock-A- 
Thon to raise money for the Children's Physical 
Development Clinic and the girl scouts. The 
event, in which members of the sorority sat in 
front of the Campus Center in rocking chairs, 
lasted from noon on May 2, to noon on May 3. 
During the overnight session, members of fra- 
ternities came and stayed with the Gammas, 
keeping them active and awake. Brothers from 
Sigma Pi brought blankets and pillows while 
brothers from Sigma Tau Gamma and Theta 
Chi brought the Gammas hot chocolate and 
doughnuts. When all was said and done, the 
happy, but tired members of Gamma Phi Beta 
had raised over $1000 during the period. 



389 




Athletic Trainers 



FRONT ROW: Margret Sheilds, Ann Landry, Christopher Joyce, Kenneth Johnson, Gina DiCarlo, Maura Powers, Tara Dolan, 
Kady Plante, Heather SwedisJBACK ROW: Scott Azulay, Keith Chagaris, Matthew Gerken, David Allen, Shawn Rickan, 
Joseph Reilly, Sanna Vrlik, Michelle Banville, Christine Ortwein, MISSING: Amy Sullivan, Susan Pollard, Peter Gruca 




Chamber Singers 

FRONT ROW: Gideon Webster, Timothy Campell. Laura Colclough, Dennis Belanger, Laurie Ashley, Moe Rondeu .SECOND 
ROW: Jonathen Dyer, Corrine Paquin, Karen Modano.BACK ROW: Steve Tinglof, Jen Amaral, Shauna Havlin, Ian 
McGonnigal, Kerry Haulin, Jenn Duval. 



392 




College Republicans 



FRONT ROW: Joseph Foglietta, Joseph Lane, Charles Doherty, Dave Colby. 




Game Club 



FRONT ROW: Pamela Gallo, Charles Eaton, Neil Seymour, Steve Culp, Andrea Neal.BACK ROW: Jim Hardiman, Jeremy 
Henrichon, Matthew Renyar Horn, David Pereira, Derick Bodamer MISSING: Christine Santheson. Tim Edwards, Glen 
"Chowder" Chanter. 



393 




Student Alumni Relations Council 



FRONT ROW: Kim Grande, Jen Smith, Linda Dutra, Michele Donnelly, Dianne Carter.SECOND ROW: Jennifer Mello, Paul 
Cournoyer, Lynda Sarazen, Clare Coyne, Mary Ellen DeRoche.BACK ROW: Andrea Ayer, Donna Fogel, Lauren Lauria. 




Program Committee 

FRONT ROW: Marie Travers, Jakie Caparella, Peggy Lenehan, Cathleen Warren, Pamela Holm, Caitlin Andrews, Scott 
Enos, SECOND ROW: Grace DeAbreu, Jane Le, Deirdre Tinlin, Tobi Krasnow, Heather Watson, Linda Dutra, Cara Petrie, 
Larry Marchese, BACK ROW: Karen Courtney, Christina Aylward, Cindy Holt, Peter Hart, Kathy Devine, Kelly Herman, 
Douglas Eckelkamp, Pam Arrighi. 



• • I v., m 

394 



Forensics 



FRONT ROW: Maurine Lindquist, Karen Foley, Alison Lobo, Jane Eddleston .FRONT ROW: Dana Cutter, Dave Fenton 
Jacqueline Lobos, Kristin Linquist.BACK ROW: Kristin Bakutis, Francois Barbeau, Susan Miskelly. 



4 




Amnesty International 



FRONT ROW: Tammi Hough, Bruce Conelly, Dianna Fiske, Dauphne Trcnholm.BACK ROW: Paulo Vincente, Christine 
Cleary, Monica Henderson, Denise Bolduc, Mary Fahy, Kerrilee Keith, Dr. Vernon Domingo. 




Future Teachers Association 



FRONT ROW: Tanya Raper, Kristen Darling, Amy Farrar, Lori Morales, Kristine Ziniti.BACK ROW: Lisa Marcheterre, 
Kimberly Conrad, Malisa Morais, Sonja Allen. 




Political Science 

FRONT ROW: Christopher Perra, Edward Tighe. 



- ■ • - 

396 




Circle K 



FRONT ROW: Kristen Darling, Stacey O'Brien, Karen Alfonso, Lauren Grant, Tom LaGrasta .SECOND ROW: Susan 
VanDeventer, Tracy Verdetti, Nicole Gilbert, R.J. Gugliotti, Brenda Froid, Andrew Griffith.BACK ROW: Sonja Allen, Elena 
Murphy, Jeff Driscoll, David Pereira, Kristine Aristide, Patrick Marshall. 




English 

FRONT ROW: Elizabeth Walsh, Paul Lambert, Elsa Ascenso, John Bisazza. 



397 




FRONT ROW Michael Delia Penna, Jeffrey H Rothberg, Michael Rothberg, Gary Parziale, Dave Colby, Charles Doherty. 
SECOND ROW:Kristine Gallagher, Colleen Gleason, Lisa Clary, Jennifer Shaw, Edward Tighe, Sharon Cignetti, James 
Wells. BACK ROW:Jim McElhinney, Joseph Lange, Jeremy Henrichon, Joseph Foglietta, Paul Cangiano, Christopher Perra, 
Rick Damon. 




NSSLHA 

FRONT ROW: Sharon Orso, Kristina Sakellis, Beth Wayda, Stacey Pappus. BACK ROW: Kathy Wall, Gina Galego, Michelle 
Nogueira, Tiffany Jolie. 



398 




Communications Club 



FRONT ROW: Christopher Mather, Cathleen Clark, Robyn Gaynor, Annmarie Weir, Sheryl Bartley, Patricia Rubbico, 
Kirhberly Stoddard, Christine Canavan.BACK ROW: Heidi McHugh, Stephen Lyons, Karen Saliba, Tracey Hector, Jac- 
queline Lobos, Rebekan Sudikoff , Robin Jaeger, Gail Castell, Janet Lord, Julie Flynn, Susan Little, Maribeth Koczela, Jackie 
Capavella, Leeann Krikorian. 




Chemistry-Biology Club 

FRONT ROW: John Kowalski, Ann Morrill, Johm Mone, Wassim, Khoury, Andrea Neil, Dr. Vahc Marganian, Achmed HI, 
David Pereira. 



399 




Social Work 



FRONT ROW: David Kemplc, Michelle Cyr, Elfrieda Gershman.BACK ROW: Robert Cayer, Kathleen McEachern, Veanne 
Heaton. 




Earth Science & Geography Club 



FRONT ROW: Dan Thompson, Mary Lynch, Jonathan Morse, Kim Hazelton, Andrea Neal, Robin Clark, Laurent Liberge, Paul 
Pironti, SECOND ROW: Tom Chamberlin, Donna Cram, Kathy Counter, Diane Pankiewicz,BACK ROW: Dr. Richard Enright, 
Derick Bodamer, Dorrie Girten, Tom Lupien, Sharon Cignetti, Steve Culp, Paul Cournoyer, Chris Gill, Joe Mazenac. 



i 



400 




Residence Hall Council 



FRONT ROW: Thuy Cook, Kim, Elisa Simonian, Deb L 'Italian, Cindy Ciavattieri, Christine MacDonald, BACK ROW: Steve 
Richards, Larry Marchese Charles Eaton, Chris Messina, Mike Delia Penna, Jeff Bruno, Doug Sutherland, Tammi Henderson, 
Courtney Burke, Paula Buonomo, Janie Andrews. 




WBIM 



FRONT ROW: Elsa Ascenso, Katy Gallagher, Stephanie Yetner, Doreen Duarte, Terri McCarthy, Lindi,BACK ROW: Jeff 
Levesque, Matt Horn, Jeremy Henrichon, Bruce Connolly, Mike Mullaney, P.K., Neil Burns, Scott Arthur, Herb. 



401 



Comment 



FRONT ROW: Leisha Cipriano, Mike Ostrowski, Sue Little, Nicole Rozanski,BACK ROW: Tom Curran, Tom Magee, Apryl 
Stith, Bryon Hayes 




Chorale 



FRONT ROW: Roxanne Marco, Nancy Shultz, Gideon Webster, Laurie Ashley, Barbara Dimartino, SECOND ROW: Susan 
Belcher, Dauphne Jnemholm, Moe Rondeau, Laura Colelough, Dennis Belanger, Jenn Duval, Kim Fritts, THIRD ROW: 
Jonathon Dyer, Tim Campbell, Karen Hynes, Paula Conover, Corrine Paquin, Karen Modano, Janet Kelly, FOURTH ROW: 
Jen Amaral, Leighann McGovern, Ian McGonnigal, Kerry Havlin, Dr. Robert Ward, BACK ROW: Jen Condon, Shauna Haulin, 
Chris Handrickson, Steve Tinglof. 





Senior Class Officers 



FRONT ROW: Sharon Cignetti, Sheryl Bartley, Annmarie Weir, BACK ROW: Kevin 
Kindregan, Jorge Neves, Scott Murphy. 




Developmental Clinic 



^5° 



403 




^he 1990, 150th Anniver- 
sary Yearbook would not 
be complete without a small 
glimpse of all that is done on a 
day-to-day basis here at 
Bridgewater State College. 
Our goal was, not only for this 
special section but throughout 
the entire book, to promote 
Bridgewater as it is today and 
give meaning to that memory. 
To all those special photog- 
raphers who received nothing 
but headaches and difficulties 
in their task, thank you; be- 
cause Bridgewater will best be 
remembered through your 
eyes. 

Special notice of recogni- 
tion should be given to Debra 
Willis, Martha Thompson, and 
Paul Cournoyer for the ex- 
treme difficulty in accomplish- 
ing their goals. 

So here is today, tomorrow, 
and what yesterday was like 
when a student attended 
Bridgewater State College. 




4:37 pm 




419 




Assembly Hall of the Bridge- 
water Normal School "Before 
the fire." It was here that the 
whole school came together 
each morning for "Open Exer- 
cises." The faculty would sit on 
the chairs up on the front plat- 
form. 




The Closing Section is dedicated to all the 
seniors as we will miss the wisdom, energy, 
and excitement that they showed each and every 
day throughout the year. Thank you and good luck 
to you all. But always feel free to come back to 
your home away from home, your Alma Mater, 
Bridge water. 




CANDIDS 



CLOSING 





CANDIDS 



429 



CLOSING 



CANDIDS 



CLOSING 




432 






CANDIDS 



CLOSING 





CANDIDS 



435 



CLOSING 






CANDIDS 



437 



CLOSING 





CANDIDS 



439 



CLOSING 




— ■ .« 

440 





CANDIDS 



441 



CONGRATULATIONS PAUL 



CONGRATULATIONS 



To the first D'Alfomso young man to grad- 
uate from college. We are very proud of your 
accomplishment. We hope that your future is 
very successful. 

Love, 

MOM & DAD 



To all of the 1990 class members on their 
achievements. 

Sincerely, 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis Mason 



CONGRATULATIONS 
AND GOOD LUCK 

to Paula Ann Karalekas 

Love, 
MOM, 
DAD, 

CHUCK, and CHRISTOPHER 



Joe : "NEVER" let go of your dreams. We are 
so proud. FLY HIGH! 

LOVE 

DAD, 

MOM, 

CHERYL, 

JANEAN, 

and ROCKY 



CONGRATULATIONS 



To the class of 1990 and to MICHAEL 
ALOUPIS 

LOVE, 

MOM & DAD 



CONGRATULATIONS 
MELLIE 

LOVE, 

MOM, DAD, CHARLIE, and POPPY 



Dear John, /-> , i , . 

CONGRATULATIONS! We are very proud ^OngratUiatlOnS 

Allison! 

LOVE, 

DAD, MAMA, & MIKE 

We love you and we're proud of you. 
Love, 

MOM, DAD, and MELISSA 



Geoff Gill, 

We're all so proud of your accomplishment! 

Congratulations 

LOVE, 
Your Family 



Dear Joanne Higgins, 

Your parents, family and friends are extremely 
proud of your accomplishments. We all love you 
and wish the best in your future endeavors. 



Congratulations, 

May the road rise to meet you and the wind be 
always at your back. 

Love, 

Mom & Dad 



Congratulations! 

To our daughter, Sheryl, and the Class of 
1990. 

Love, 

Mom, Dad, Steven and Douglas. 



Ellisa Dawn, 

You are beautiful and warm like the morning 
sun. We pray that whatever you wish for in life; 
may it always be granted. Especially happiness. 

Love always, 

Your Mother and Sister 



Congratulations Lisa! 

We are very proud of you. 
Love, 

Mom & Dad 



To Our Daughter Maureen Saliba; 

A quick wit and sharp mind. 

A sweeter person you could never find. 

We will always be proud of you 

In whatever you choose to do. 

We wish you all the joy 

And happiness 

Which you have brought to us. 

Love, 
MOM, 

DAD, and KAREN 



Susan, 

We know you will be the absolute best at 
what you do because you're so special. 

Love, 

DAD, MUM & Jamie 



Congratulations & 
GOOD LUCK 

To Cindy Manning and the Class of 1990. 
Love, 

The Manning Clan 



To Cheryl Ann Wilson, 

We are all so proud of you, we could just burst. 
Love, 

DAD, MOM, Butch, 
Jeff, Traci, and 
Steve and Danny too. 



Donnie, 



Bridgewater State 



It's a long, long road. s-> 11 xr 1 1 

Congratulations and good luck! ^OliegC YearDOOK 

Love, says 

Dianne 
BSC '89 



BEST OF LUCK 



CLASS OF 1990 



BENEFACTORS 

The Staff of the 1990 Ursae Majoris Yearbook would like to extend its gratitude to the 
parents, friends, faculty members, and alumni who generously donated to the 1990 edition 
of the Ursae Majoris. 



GOLD CLUB SILVER CLUB BRONZE CLUB 



Dr. & Mrs. Francis Mason 
Bob and Bernice Pimental 
Mr. & Mrs. Charles Martin Jr. 
Stanely and Anne-Marie Lowell 
James and Helen Chaney 



Ronald & Dorthy Graveline 
Mr. & Mrs. Robert P. Diette 
Mr. & Mrs. Richard E. Mahoney 



Mr. & Mrs. Donald G Preskenis 

The Burgio Family 

Richard & Gloria Lind 

John & Mary Weir 

Mr. & Mrs. William R. Cullen 



When I first accepted the position of 
Yearbook Editor I didn't realize the ex- 
treme difficulty and resistance that I 
would face from our own administration 
and faculty. I felt it extremely important 
that this, being Bridgewater's 150th an 
niversary, should be a special yearbook 
to celebrate the occasion properly. 

My staff was one of the largest and 
probably one of the hardest to harness 
with all the raw talent that they had. To 
the staff: I am extremely grateful for your 
putting up with me and my vision oi 
hopefully, Bridgewater's finest yearbook 
ever. 

Yearbook production is very specif 
and hard work. It was not easy to cov 
every single event that the staff wanted 
to cover due to lack of space and me 
power, but those events covered are 
our view some of the most memorat 
moments. 

I hope that when you read through [Y 
yearbook now that you are a gradu 
you will get the sense that our staff w 
not about putting together just anoth 
yearbook but about putting togeth 
memories that you will be able to tat 
with you long after you leave Brid 
water. And it is that goal which motive 
my actions throughout the entire yea 
led to the addition of two new sect 
never before in our traditional yearb 
"Day in the Life" and the "Annivers? 
section which we didn't have to celebr 
but were fortunate to swing it. 

Though I and my staff receive 
honors or payment for the numer 
hours spent each day on the boo! 
our pleasure to give you this book 
sacrifice we made, we hope, is your g 







1 



Leighann 
McGovern 
Managing Editor 




im 




Debra Willis 
Photo Editor 



Martha Thomsoi 
Photo Editor 



Lisa Henshaw 
Anniversary 
Editor 




^^-var. Wt 



Tom Lupien 
Anniversary 
Assistant 




Katherine Jacobs 
Residence Editor 





Christopher Perra 
Year in Review 
Editor 



Steve Culp 
Steve McPhee 
Graphic Artists 




Bryon Hayes 
Greeks Editor 



Special Acknowledgements 




Phil Conroy 
Advisor 



The Yearbook would not have been 
complete without the help of a few 
very special people. Mabell Bates over 
in the Library Archives was a tre- 
mendous help in recovering the 
school's history in both photographs 
and written material. Our sports were 
directed by Mike Storey in the Public 
Affairs Office in Harrington, and the 
Arts of Student Life were due to the 
hard efforts of Ashley McCumber in 
the Alumni Office. Of all the help we 
were given, Phil Conroy, our advisor, 
was a wealth of information and an 
extreme help when administration be- 
gan to hinder our progress and a bat- 
tle would result. 

It was difficult to produce a 464 
Dage book at a total working budget 
Df 48,478 dollars raised from SGA 



Mike Storey 
Sports 



Ashley 
McCumber 
Press 



and our own fundraisers. It is im- 
portant to note that no one received 
any special credits nor payment for 
their services. All members did their 
work as contributions to Bridge water. 
It was not easy to ask people to sac- 
rifice their time, energy, and hard 
work all for a book which would re- 
ceive no thanks or appreciation as has 
been customary in the past. 

To my staff, you are the BEST! No 
one can take away all the hard work 
you put into the book because it 
shows. And should anyone say it's 
easy to produce a yearbook, which we 
know isn't the case, tell them to give it 
a try and see how many days they 
last. 

The following pages to come are 
the hard and individual work as pho- 



tographers are shown. Though not 
many will look to see who took what 
picture, it is important because it was 
a glimpse of Bridgewater through 
your eyes and that is what makes this 
an important part of our insight. For 
each page throughout the book, from 
top to bottom and left to right, the 
photos have been labeled by page 
number first with a letter (a-z) as your 
eyes go (t-b and 1-r). It is never easy 
giving credit where credit is due, but 
all photographers, whether many 
photos or few were used, all were 
priceless in the importance and help. 

Lastly, I say thank you one and all, 
for without your determination and 
consistent voice the book would never 
have gotten off the ground. Thank 
you staff. 




451 




69d, 70c, 71abe, 73c, 74f, lOOabcdef, lOlabcd, UOabcdef, lllabcd, 112b, 
113bd, 164b, 170b, 179b, 180b, 181b, 236a, 320a, 321ab, 323a, 324a, 326b, 
328ab, 330a, 369a, 384a, 385e, 389abe, 406h, 408k, 409be, 410fi, 411aj, 412bd, 
413j, 416bd, 417ae, 418dfh, 419bdghi, 420bcf, 421c, 422bcfj, 423af, 428i, 
429afhi, 432g, 433hi, 437de, 441f By Debra Willis 



52bcdefg, 53abcd, 54abcdefghi, 55abcde, 68cf, 70adegh, 71d, 104abcdef, 
105abcd, 169ab, 177a, 178b, 197a, 206a, 208abc, 209abcd, 433b, 407b, 409i, 
410c, 412h, 415h, 416k, 420eg, 422d, 423ghj by Paul Pironti 




56abcdef, 57abcd, 58abcdefghi, 59abcde, 60abcdefghi, 61abcde, 68abde, 69a, 72abcdefghi, 
73abcd, 74abcdegh, 75abcde, 76bcefghi, 77abde, 78abcfg, 79abcde, 86abcdef, 87abcd, 
88abcdefghi, 89ade, 92c, 93ac, 94a, 106abcde, 107bcd, 108abcde, 109abcd, 112acdef, 113ac, 
114abcdefghi, 115abcde, 116abcdef, 117abcd, 118abcdefghi, 119abcde, 120abcdefghi, 
121abcde, 122abcdefghi, 123abcde, 124abcdefghi, 125abcde, 134abcdef, 135abcd, 136 
abcdefghi, 137abcde, 138abcdefghi, 139abcde, 140abcdefghi, 141abcde, 165ab, 167ab, 172bc, 
191a, 193c, 195c, 198a, 182abcd, 183abcd, 184abcdef, 185abcd, 186ab, 167a, 188abc, 189abc, 
203a, 204abcdef, 205abcdef, 223a, 224abcde, 225abcd, 226a, 228abcde, 229abcde, 242abe, 
243d, 245a, 246abcdhi, 247aefg, 406ce, 408bdfi, 409c, 410abd, 411k, 412fgi, 413bef, 414c, 
415ce, 416f , 417c, 418a, 419ck, 421i, 427af , 428efghi, 430abcdfghi, 431abcdefghi, 432abcdefh, 
433acdef , 434bcdfhi, 435abcdefghi, 436bcdgh, 437abcghi, 438abcefghi, 439abcdfhi, 440abcegh, 
441 ghi by Paul Cournoyer 



62c, 63ad, 64h, 65af, 66dfgi, 67bcd, 69c, 70f, 76d, 94bcdef, 95abcd, 102abf, 
166bc, 171ab, 173ab, 174bc, 175ab, 176bc, 194a, 196abc, 197b, 199bc, 219a, 
231a, 368c, 371b, 383abc, 339c, 432i, 433g, 434aeg, 436f , 440i, 441a, 407c, 408ah, 
414bdeg, 416ah, 417d, 421ae by Martha Thomson 



164c, 170c, 181a, 194b, 74i, 76a, 77c, 78dh, 410k, 411hi, 414jk, 421f, 
423i by Michelle Gooding 



8a, 92abd, 93d, 102cde, i03abcd, 168bc, 177b, 178c, 180c, 193a, 197c, 216a, 
370a, 403b, 436i, 407di, 409fj, 410ej, 411b, 413c, 415i, 417g, 419f, 420k, 421b, 
423d by Debbi Isles 



453 



63b, 64b, 66bcg, 70bi, 89bc, 421g 



.by Steve McPhee 



211a, 414af, 415j by Jennifer Smolinski 



421f by Michelle Wall 



71c, 421hj by Monique Richard 



9a, 10b, 11a, 12a, 62a, 64adei, 65c, 66c 



.by James Hollister 



407f, 408e, 411def, 414h, 415abdf, 416eij, 417fh, 418h, 420a, 
422h by Priscilla Hotz 

406d, 407h, 408g, 409k, 412cj, 414i, 415g, 416g, 422c by Susan Di- 

Nocco 



J 

455 




6a, 7a, 10a, 12b, 13a, 80abcdef, 81abcd, 82abcdefghi, 83abcde, 84abcdefghi, 
85abcde By Ted Ringold 



369b, 368b, 370b, 372b, 374b, 382b, 383de, 384bcefh, 385c, 386fh, 387cd, 410h, 
412a, 413dik, plus some residence submissions By Gretchen Yoder 



240a, 242cd, 243abce, 246efg, 247bcd, 368d, 98abcdef, 99abcd. 
Dave Newman 



.Bi 




Dorm Halls were a Combination of submissions and organizatio 
by Kathrine Jacobs 



456 



375abc, 376abc, 377abcde, 378abcd, 379abc, 380abc, 381abcde, 382acdfgh, 
384dg, 385abd, 386abcdeg, 387abe, 388abc, 389cd By Bryon Hayes 



406b, 407g, 409ag, 422ag, 423c By Antonio Goulart 



457 




463 



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